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Contents for January 17, 2017

1. Raquel Rabinovich, FF Alumn, at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, opening Jan. 31

I hope you will join me for the opening of "Raquel Rabinovich: Excerpts", an exhibition that brings together drawings from my ongoing "River Library" series in the context of the Pratt Library. Co-sponsored by the Pratt Institute Libraries and Franklin Furnace Archive, the exhibition is curated by Alex Bacon, a scholar, writer and curator based in New York City.

I look forward to seeing you at the opening reception - details below.

All best wishes,
Raquel
www.raquelrabinovich.com

Raquel Rabinovich: Excerpts
January 31 - April 3, 2017
OPENING RECEPTION: Tuesday, January 31, 2017, 5 - 7 PM
Pratt Institute Libraries-Brooklyn Campus
200 Willoughby Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11205
T 718-399-4356
Enter the Brooklyn Campus at the Hall Street and Dekalb Avenue corner campus gate

Panel Discussion: Wednesday March 1st 6-8pm
at Pratt Institute Libraries-Brooklyn Campus, Alumni Reading Room
with
Raquel Rabinovich
Alex Bacon
Robert C. Morgan
Moderator: Martha Wilson

LIVE AT THE LIBRARY is a new collaborative exhibition program for professional artists in Pratt's Brooklyn campus Library between Franklin Furnace and Pratt Institute. The purpose of this program is to more closely integrate the Pratt student and faculty community with the art world and the community that surrounds it. As the diaspora of cultural organizations continues, we believe that working together, Pratt Library and Franklin Furnace can attract a wide audience to Clinton Hill, Brooklyn.

In 2015, art critic and Pratt adjunct professor Robert C. Morgan proposed a solo exhibition by Raquel Rabinovich that brings together drawings from her ongoing River Library series with a video documentary of her Emergences sculpture installations.

Rabinovich was born in Argentina in 1929, and educated at the Universities of Cordoba, Edinburgh and the Sorbonne in Paris. After residing for some years in Europe, she returned to Argentina in 1960, but due to Argentina's unstable political climate during the 1960s she emigrated with her family to the United States in 1967, settling in New York.

Rivers have fascinated Rabinovich since the early 2000s. She has said they resemble the fluidity of life; they come and go as they please, borders or governments do not bind them. Observing how rivers flow freely across the countries of the world and how their waters constantly flow while their sediments accumulate layer upon layer, she has been using stones from rivers to make sculptures and mud from rivers to make drawings. In 2001-02 she began two series of experimental works: Emergences and River Library. Emergences is a series of stone sculpture installations the artist created in site-specific locations along the shores of the Hudson River. They exist in a continual state of flux, being gradually concealed and revealed with the daily rising and falling of the river tides. River Library is a series of drawings in which the artist uses mud from rivers from all over the world as her medium, thus capturing the history of the earth and humankind. They introduce the viewer to an abstract language that speaks of our global connection. The language of these drawings does not recognize separation, boundaries or the artificial borders between countries. Through these works, the viewer may experience a vision of one world and one people like the rivers that flow freely across the countries of the world. As Marjorie Agosin writes in World Literature Today, "I believe Raquel is a poet of the visual world."

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2. Nora York, FF Alumn, memorial at Cooper Union Great Hall, Manhattan, Feb. 5

Dean Allyson Green, Tisch School of the Arts
and
The Department of Drama
join with
The Family of Nora York
to
Invite you to share in a
celebration commemorating the
life and legacy of Nora York.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2017
2:00pm - 4:30pm
The Great Hall
Cooper Union
41 Cooper Union Square
7 East 7th Street
between 3rd & 4th Avenues
New York, NY 10003

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3. Cave Dogs, FF Alumn, at The Academy for Moderne Circus and The Academy for Untamed Creativity, Copenhagen, Denmark, Jan. 24-25, and more

Cave Dogs new performance, Liquid States: a watery journey through shadows, will be performed at the following venues in Scandinavia.

On 1/25/17 at 7pm., Cave Dogs will perform at The Academy for Moderne Circus (AMoC) & The Academy for Untamed Creativity (AFUK), Copenhagen, Denmark. They will also hold workshops there on 1/24-25/17, where they will be collaborating with circus performers. For more information, please visit www.afukamoc.dk/

On 1/28/17 at 5pm Cave Dogs will perform for the Grand Opening of the Skissernas Museum in Lund, Sweden. They will also do a sneak preview at the VIP event on Friday 1/27/17 at 8:00 pm. For more information, please visit: www.skissernasmuseum.se

AMoC/AFUK address--- Enghavevej 82B - 2450 Kbh SV - Denmark

Skissernas Museum Grand Opening, Lund, Sweden,
Finn 2, SE-223
62 Lund
460-462-2272 x83
info@skissernasmuseum.lu.se
5:00 pm
(sneak preview at the VIP event on Friday 1/27/17 @ 8:00 pm)

Cave Dogs presents a startling original way of telling a story. Fluid shadows and images dance in wild imagination across the screen. Each performance promises a healthy dose of the sublime, the exciting, the absurd and the downright fun that will result in something infinitely compelling.

Our new performance, Liquid States: a watery journey through shadows, is a compilation of short stories, which explore water as substance, metaphoric allusion, and engages debates relating to the geographies and socio-politics of water. The performance further focuses on water in its many physical states and cultural circumstances, narratives, histories, memories and journeys. From baptismal fonts to oceanic waves, the work forms a collective narrative that addresses mankind's complicated relationship to this essential natural resource.

Innovative, large-scale shadow projections cast onto a screen from a variety of props, costumes and performers move in concert with projected video, spoken narrative, and an original soundtrack. The mobility of the light sources allow for multiple, richly layered visual tableaus, and effects that conjure both the dreamlike quality of early experimental film and the humor of contemporary animation. We coax trees to grow and teach whales to sing. It's magical, like watching dreams cross into the conscious world.

Cave Dogs are Suzanne Stokes, Jim Fossett, Adam Mastropaolo, Douglas Keller, Ted Conway, Trudy Trutwin, Maria Jansdotter-Farr and Emerson Fossett. Dean Jones, Grammy Award winner, created the soundtrack.

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4. Robert Rauschenberg, FF Alumn, at GL Holtegaard, Holte, Denmark, opening Jan. 19

Robert Rauschenberg
A Window to China
"The Lotus Series"
January 20-April 17, 2017

Opening: January 19, 5-7pm

gl Holtegaard
Gl Holte
Attemosevej 170
DK-2840 Holte
Denmark

T +45 45 80 08 78
gl-holtegaard@rudersdal.dk

www.glholtegaard.dk
Facebook / Instagram
Robert Rauschenberg is one of the great American artists. He incorporated "everyday life" into pictures, sculptures, paintings and collages that radically transformed Western art from the 1950s to the present. "The Lotus Series," Rauschenberg's final graphic piece from 2008, will be presented at Gl. Holtegaard from January 20, 2017 through April 17, 2017. This exhibition is made possible with the cooperation of Kevin Pottorf, Rauschenberg's assistant for the last ten years of the artist's life, and Florence Tone, assistant curator who acted as intermediary to initiate this endeavor.
For the first time in Denmark
The exhibition highlights Robert Rauschenberg's (1925-2008) immense artistic interest in China and examines an idealistic artist whose profound conviction to the arts had him constantly searching for new ways to utilize art as a potential lever for intercultural dialogue. During a trip to China in 1982, Rauschenberg took almost 500 photographs as a travel diary. From this compilation of photographs, Rauschenberg found material for the two collections that are on exhibition at Gl. Holtegaard. This collection has never before been presented in Denmark. "Studies for Chinese Summerhall" (1983), a photo series comprised of ten original prints (38 x 38 cm), is characterized by simple and precise compositions where "everyday" scenes of Chinese life are on display.
"The Lotus Series" was created concurrent with the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. The series consists of 12 digital prints-ten are printed as photogravure-with an overlapping juxtaposition of photos depicting ordinary scenes from Chinese cities, such as markets, streets, harbor, trains, alleys, etc. Each photogravure is supplemented with the distinctive Chinese lotus flower.
The collections' Chinese origin is brought into perspective from an archived BBC documentary and a Danish documentary taken from Danish Broadcasting Corporation. The exhibition examines Rauschenberg's immersion into a country that would form the basis of his artistic practice from his first trip to China in 1982 until his last graphic work in 2008.
Rauschenberg the Idealist
During his trip to China, Rauschenberg experienced the state-controlled cultural obscurity, which became the catalyst for a project he dreamed of: an international traveling exhibition called Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange (ROCI). His ambition was to create transcultural meetings through exhibitions of his own art in 11 totalitarian and politically closed countries. From 1984 to 1991, Rauschenberg himself financed the project by selling pieces from his private collection to keep the project free of political and economic interests. In correlation with the worldview of the Cold War, his vision was to provide an exhibition as both a window for the outside world to a closed country while simultaneously presenting the culture of a local population in a new light. He managed to produce travel exhibitions in 11 countries, including Mexico, Chile, Venezuela, China, Tibet, Japan, Cuba, USSR, Malaysia, Germany and USA.
The exhibitions contributors and collaborators
Kevin Pottorf, Robert Rauschenberg's assistant for the last ten years of the artist's life, is loaning "The Lotus Series" to Gl. Holtegaard. A visual artist himself, Pottorf worked side by side with Rauschenberg and helped transform the artist's ideas into graphic works following Rauschenberg's instructions. Assistant curator Florence Tone established and facilitated the contact between Gl. Holtegaard and Kevin Pottorf to make this exhibition possible. Ms. Tone has a history in Holte and with Denmark, as she was formerly married to a Dane. In addition, the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum loaned the photograph collection "Studies for Chinese Summerhall." The exhibition is supported by the S.C. Van Fund and the Politiken Fund. Gl. Holtegaard's two-year exhibition program is also supported by Danish Arts Foundation.
Press
More information about the exhibition contact Gl. Holtegaard's director / exhibition curator Maria Gadegaard: mgad@rudersdal.dk / T +45 45 80 08 78 or Press & Communications Officer Nina Peitersen: ninp@rudersdal.dk / T +45 45 80 08 78

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5. EIDIA, FF Alumns, at Plato's Cave, Brooklyn, opening Jan. 21

EIDIA Plato's Cave presents: PUPPET PRESIDENT[S] & POWER
opening reception: Saturday, January 21st 6-8pm with wine reception at Plato's Cave, 14 Dunham Place Brkln NY 11249
Visit exhibit by appointment through Feb. 3.

Hello All, An open invitation.
In the spirit of J20 Art Strike January 20 and WRITERS RESIST
to be held nationally in the US on January 15, MLK day, EIDIA
House Plato's Cave invites you to participate in a special
exhibit that will display each poem entered, printed on card
stock 8 1/2 x 11inch or larger in the Plato's Cave vault
space @ EIDIA House Studio, 14 Dunham Place Brkln NY 11249.

Email your poem in the body of an email and also attached as
pdf to: EIDIA HOUSE

Deadline midnight, Friday, January 13, 2017.

title: PUPPET PRESIDENT[S] & POWER

Please Improve on the following poem provided by Paul
Lamarre of EIDIA House for Plato's Cave. I know that there is a
prodigious preponderance of the "p" here, "(b)put" propose
your own poem or prose on the topic at hand. Your version may
be exhibited in Plato's Cave for WRITERS RESIST January 15th,

Exhibition will open with wine reception Jan. 21, 6-8pm at Plato's Cave
View by appointment to February 3, 2017:

PUPPET PRESIDENT[S] & POWER

A patronizing puppet President
picked, primped, preened and plumed
to NOT be "Presidential"
so to piss off the proletariat, the plebs, and the hoi polloi,
for peoples to be pitted against peoples..
and that is the point..
A puppet president again placed in place by predominate
powers driven by powerfulness, greed, paranoia,
and sociopathic self proclaimed providence,
so to perpetrate atrocities
on peoples for profit propagated plunder, and in the end
"policed" by the privatized thereof and prisoned.

(c) 2017 EIDIA House Studio eidia.com

Plato's Cave (2009--) http://platocave.weebly.com/
http://www.eidia.com/plato/
https://instagram.com/eidiahouse/

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6. Elizabeth Murray, JoAnne Akalaitis, Jennifer Bartlett, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, Jan. 10

The New York Times
MOVIES

Review: 'Everybody Knows ... Elizabeth Murray' and Now You Will Too
EVERYBODY KNOWS ... ELIZABETH MURRAY NYT Critics' Pick Directed by Kristi Zea Documentary, Biography 1h 0m
By GLENN KENNY
JAN. 10, 2017

While she achieved a good deal of recognition in her lifetime, Elizabeth Murray, the subject of this fine yet too-short documentary, remains an American artist who hasn't quite gotten her due. One hopes "Everybody Knows ... Elizabeth Murray" changes that at least a little.

This cogent, fascinating portrait of the artist, who died in 2007 at 66, was made over several years by Kristi Zea, best known for her work as a production designer on notable films directed by Martin Scorsese and Jonathan Demme (among them "Goodfellas" and "The Silence of the Lambs"). The movie shows the great variety of Murray's always vivid, colorful work, and culminates with a triumph not just for Murray but also, as the film takes pains to point out, for women in American art: a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art. (An exhibition of her work is at the gallery Canada through Jan. 29.)

Murray comes across as personable, friendly, extremely thoughtful and wholly admirable. The movie, perhaps without intending to, demonstrates that one needn't be a prickly person to be a wonderful artist. Meryl Streep, reading from Murray's journals, does well communicating her emotional and intellectual acuity. While remaining upbeat about the artist's legacy, "Everybody Knows" is underscored by a sense of just how much the art world lost when Murray left it.

This brief feature is accompanied at Film Forum by a 30-minute short, "The 100 Years Show," a lively look at the Cuban-born artist Carmen Herrera, an art-world "discovery" as she approached her centenary. Now 101, she finally received a solo exhibition at a major New York museum (the Whitney Museum of American Art) last year.

Everybody Knows ... Elizabeth Murray NYT Critics' Pick
FIND TICKETS
Director Kristi Zea Writer Kristi Zea Stars Meryl Streep, JoAnne Akalaitis, Jennifer Bartlett, Douglas Baxter, Suzanne Bennett

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7. Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, Jan. 11

The New York Times
'Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965' Review: The Good Old Days
By
PETER PLAGENS
Jan. 11, 2017
3:49 p.m. ET

A far cry from today's scene, there once existed a New York art world marked by grit and character.

No question occupies the New York art world today more than "What's wrong with the art world?" The complaint behind the query is, oddly, that the problems are too much money, too much fame, too much glamour and too many peripheral people-especially from show business-wanting to get in on it. So, was the art world of 50 or 60 years ago actually better (more serious, more authentic, with more integrity) when cohorts of artists, fed up with-or closed off from-the slicker galleries in midtown Manhattan, moved downtown and set up their own shops in cheaper spaces?

"Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965," at the intrepid Grey Art Gallery at New York University (located in the heart of the "downtown" of the exhibition), doesn't ask that question directly. But its implied answer is, "Yes, there once existed a New York art world marked by grit and character that bears little resemblance to what's going on today."
Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965
Grey Art Gallery
Through April 1

The exhibition, with more than 200 works of art and art-related memorabilia, is crammed into the gallery's modest upstairs space and veritable short corridor downstairs. Nevertheless, the militantly grungy collages, heartfelt assemblages, optimistically brushy abstractions, and fliers for gatherings featuring jazz, poetry and grainy film screenings combine to give the visitor a real feeling for the ethos and the era. All that's missing in the gallery are a lot of people (mostly men) in dark overcoats, smoking cigarettes (almost required back then) and worrying about who'll sit at the reception desk next week.

Organized into segments devoted to those downtown self-help galleries and their affiliated artists, "Inventing Downtown" re-creates the communal, salon-style installations at 14 artist-run spaces-Tanager, Hansa, Brata, Reuben and Park Place among them. (While Tanager lasted 10 years and Hansa close to seven, the average lifespan of these pioneering galleries was about 2 1/2 years.)

Credit where due for risk and fortitude, but what about the art itself? Much of it is quite good, and would hold up on the wall in any spacious Chelsea emporium. An untitled 1958 abstract charcoal drawing, with collage, by Charles Cajori is a bit reminiscent of advanced art-class exercises, but it's unusually meaty and intense. Allan Kaprow-who'd get famous as one of the main players in those semi-Dada performances known as Happenings-could really paint, as "Blue Blue Blue" (1956) proves. And an early work by George Segal, "Reclining Woman Bas Relief: Nude" (1958), poignantly alludes both to Matisse and to Segal's future sculptures of real people being cast in plaster.
No good big group show is without surprises. For me they're a couple of small, exquisite geometric collages from 1963 by Tamara Melcher, and Sam Goodman's poster-which looks like a delivery van flattened by an avalanche-for the "Doom Show" at the March Gallery in 1961. History is not kind to everything in the show. Paintings by Robert Rauschenberg ("Untitled [Formerly Titled Collage With Horse]," 1957) and Angelo Ippolito ("Storm," 1956), for example, evince that off-center, Golden Section-ish arrangement we were all taught in art school.

The essential vibe of "Inventing Downtown" is of Abstraction Expressionism struggling to stay vital or, if that wasn't possible, to reinvent itself. During the show's time bracket, of course, Pop Art conquered the art world and greased the chute-intentionally or not-for the likes of Jeff Koons and his multimillion-dollar, hedge-fund-friendly anodized footnotes to Andy Warhol.

The most crucial artist in the whole exhibition is Claes Oldenburg, who was the bridge from the old to the new. He starts out, in the show's somewhat disguised chronology, almost as one of those self-taught "outsider" artists, with two primitivist drawings-"Man and Woman Walking on Street" and "Man and Woman, TA," both from 1960. Soon, he's into messiness (which is the overriding "look" of the whole exhibition), with barely referential objects for his "Ray Gun Show" at the Judson Gallery in 1960, and then artfully slapdash paint-and-plaster renditions of the likes of "Blue Men's Hat" (1963). From there he goes on, as we all know, to more uptown Pop and, eventually, to giant, industrially fabricated commissions in major museums-the kind of thing that ambitious artists in today's rocket-to-stardom art world think they deserve right out of graduate school.

Compared to the elegant fusion cuisine laid out in antiseptic surroundings so common in our own art world, "Inventing Downtown" is a pungent, over-seasoned beef stew served up by Uncle Ned in a a greasy T-shirt. It's got some gristle in it, sure, but a lot of nutrition, too. Have a hefty helping-which means take some time with this show (or, if you can't make it to the Grey Gallery, the beautiful, readable catalog). It's worth it.
-Mr. Plagens is an artist and writer in New York.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/inventing-downtown-artist-run-galleries-in-new-york-city-1952-1965-review-the-good-old-days-1484167779

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8. Judith Bernstein, FF Alumn, at Swiss Institute, Manhattan, Jan. 24

BOOK LAUNCH
DICKS OF DEATH: JUDITH BERNSTEIN

JUDITH BERNSTEIN IN CONVERSATION WITH THOMAS MICCHELLI
AT SWISS INSTITUTE, TO MARK THE PUBLICATION OF HER NEW BOOK
DICKS OF DEATH.

TUESDAY - JANUARY 24, 2017 - 7PM
RSVP@SWISSINSTITUTE.NET

SWISS INSTITUTE / CONTEMPORARY ART
102 FRANKLIN STREET, FRONT 1
NEW YORK, NY 10013

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9. Stephanie Brody Lederman, FF Alumn, at Mattatuck Museum, CT

I have a painting, "The Mystery of the Landscape at Dawn" now up in the Collections Gallery at the Mattatuck Museum in Ct. Thank you. Stephanie Brody Lederman

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10. Melissa Rachleff, Emma Amos, Simone Forti, Mimi Gross, Allan Kaprow, Yoko Ono, Robert Rauschenberg, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, Jan. 12

The New York Times
ART & DESIGN | ART REVIEW

When Artists Ran the Show: 'Inventing Downtown,' at N.Y.U.
By HOLLAND COTTER
JAN. 12, 2017

When a call went out online recently for an art world protest strike - "no work, no school, no business" - on Inauguration Day, more than 200 artists, most based in New York, many well known, quickly signed on. In numbers, they represent a mere fraction of the present art world, and there was reason to expect the list would grow. By contrast, in New York in the 1950s, 200 artists pretty much were that world, and one divided into several barely tangent circles.

That era's cultural geometry has been badly in need of study, and now it's getting some in a labor-of-love exhibition called "Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965," at the Grey Art Gallery at New York University. With nearly 230 objects, it's big and has its share of stars. But it's not a masterpiece display. It's something almost better: a view of typical - rather than outstanding - art, of familiar artists looking unfamiliar, and of strangers you're glad to meet. It looks the way history looks before the various MoMAs get their sanitizing hands on it: funky, diverse, down to earth, with things to teach us now.

By 1952, Abstract Expressionism was the big American deal, the art that won the culture war with Europe. Americans like muscle, ego and size, all of which Ab Ex had. The market likes brands, and will create them where it can, and did so in the case of Ab Ex, which made many people, including the uptown Manhattan dealers who sold it, quite happy.

Not everyone was thrilled. Not all artists were. Some itched to have success as part of the trend but couldn't quite figure out how. Others were tired of abstraction; they wanted to paint people and nature, tell stories, or try out crazy new forms that merged art and theater. For still others, politics, and art's expression of it, was of primary concern. The only guaranteed way these artists could achieve their goals was by opening galleries of their own, and they did.

The earliest of these 1950s artist-run galleries were downtown, on or around 10th Street, east of Fourth Avenue, where rents were cheap. The Grey show, organized by Melissa Rachleff, a clinical associate professor at the New York University Steinhardt School of Art, features 14 such spaces, a few of which lasted for years, others for just a few months.

The most stable were the so-called cooperative galleries, or co-ops, established by groups of artists who paid monthly dues to cover rent, pitched in on running the place, and made joint decisions about membership: whom to bring in, and whom to kick out. In return for their commitments, they could, on a rotating schedule, show their art.

The earliest of the three co-ops covered by the show, Tanager Gallery, was also the longest-lived, surviving from 1952 to 1962. And it was the one with the most market-friendly aesthetic, a little something for all tastes. Samples of work by members range from realism (a 1959 double portrait by Alex Katz of his wife, Ada), to semi-abstraction (Lois Dodd's wonderful 1958 picture of three caramel-colored cows), to the full-on gestural painting of Charles Cajori, Fred Mitchell and Perle Fine.

As is true throughout the show, there are memorable discoveries here. One is a sculpture: a splendid wood figure carving by Mary Frank, suggesting the form of a dancer, which Ms. Frank was. The other find is Jean Follett, whose ghostly assemblage painting, "3 Black Bottles," is in a world of its own. Tanager's gestural painters would have fit right in at uptown galleries, and aspired to. But in the 1950s, Ms. Follett, who after early success left New York, was still looking for a receptive place to land.

She found one in 1952 at Hansa Gallery. It was named for Hans Hofmann, a revered teacher who, although himself an abstract painter, encouraged his students to experiment in other styles and media. So did the gallery's young director, Richard Bellamy, who would later champion Pop and Minimalism. Their venturesome tastes may account for the variety of work in this section of the show, from Jane Wilson's vivid portrait painting of a fellow artist, Jane Freilicher, to a photograph of an early environment by Allan Kaprow, who paved the way for Conceptualism.

The third co-op, the Brata Gallery, brought some racial and ethnic diversity into the 10th Street picture. Ed Clark, fresh from Paris, was one of the very few African-American artists exhibiting in New York. And he holds the banner of abstraction high here with a picture that's basically a giant swoosh of pink. (He has a solo show at Tilton Gallery on the Upper East Side through Feb. 18.) Brata also exhibited the Japanese-born Nanae Momiyama - two of her tiny ink paintings are here - and mounted one of the most successful downtown shows of the day in the American solo debut of Yayoi Kusama, whose hypnotic and enveloping paintings caused a sensation.

That was in 1960, by which point other kinds of galleries, alternatives to the alternatives, finding 10th Street too conservative and rejecting the co-op model, had sprouted up downtown. And these spaces, scrappy and scrappily documented, are the most interesting of all.

Reuben Gallery acted a bit like a co-op - it had a steady schedule of shows - but its thinking was loose enough to accommodate Mr. Kaprow's audience-participation happenings, and the street-junk pageants of Red Grooms. In 1958 Mr. Grooms opened a space of his own, called City Gallery, in his West 24th Street studio. It lasted barely six months but presented a much-talked-about group drawing show. Ms. Rachleff has tracked down more than 20 of the original 45 works, among them a luminous Emily Mason pastel and two fantastical street scenes by Mimi Gross (who would later marry Mr. Grooms). The gifted painter Bob Thompson, dead from drugs at 29, showed here. So did the undersung Robert Beauchamp, and the poet and scholar of African art George Nelson Preston, who has a retrospective at Kenkeleba House in the East Village through Monday.

That project ended when Mr. Grooms had to move, and he started another, the Delancey Street Museum, in a deserted boxing gym on the Lower East Side. There he realized some of his own most ambitious theater pieces, and also presented a solo by the painter Marcia Marcus, now obscure, who has a way-ahead-of-its-time self-portrait at the Grey. Similarly, Judson Gallery, in a basement near Washington Square, is remembered chiefly for Claes Oldenburg's early, hair-raising performances, but was just as important for introducing painters like Marcus Ratliff and the outstandingly interesting - where can we see more of her? - Martha Edelheit.

And, fleetingly, artist-run galleries popped up way downtown, near the financial district. In the winter of 1960, Yoko Ono opened her studio-loft at 112 Chambers Street to experimental composers like La Monte Young and choreographers like Simone Forti. In 1963 a bunch of Bay Area artists settled, commune-style, in a tenement at 79 Park Place, near City Hall. They lived rough, but the hard-edged paintings produced by Tamara Melcher and Leo Valledor are as neat and clean as can be.

But long before then, downtown had moved uptown. Hansa had done a five-year stint on Central Park South, hoping to attract collectors from the commercial art district nearby. In 1960 a start-up space, Green Gallery, set up shop on 57th Street and projected a downtown ambience, thanks to its quixotic director, Mr. Bellamy. He was a downtown type if ever there was one, as is made clear in Judith E. Stein's engrossing 2016 biography, but Green Gallery was firmly in the business of doing business. In positioning Pop and Minimalism as the next art success stories, it worked with priorities that the more radical downtown spaces had resisted.

It was those spaces, where downtown existed as a state of mind as much as a place, that held my attention longest. This was partly because some were new to me, but also because their thinking seemed vital in a way that Green Gallery's did not. March Gallery, on 10th Street, was an example. Run by Boris Lurie, a Holocaust survivor, with his fellow artist Sam Goodman and a poet, Stanley Fisher, it approached art not as an ornament but as an ethical argument, a response to racism and greed. Wordy and space-hogging, their paintings seemed pitched to outshout and outbully consumer culture.

Their populist approach inspired the artist Aldo Tambellini to locate his alternative space, the Center, in the East Village streets, where people would participate in, and contribute to, his art, whether they meant to or not. The same crowdsourced ideal led the artist Phyllis Yampolsky, in 1961, to establish the Hall of Issues, a space at Judson Church where anyone, from community activists to neighborhood kids, could post bulletin-board style comments on matters that concerned them. The space, in place for two years, was a prototype for the "subway therapy" installation of thousands of handwritten sticky notes that covered a wall of the Union Square Station after the 2016 presidential election.

And there's the Spiral Group, which originated just before the 1963 March on Washington, when several African-American artists - among them Emma Amos, Romare Bearden and Norman Lewis, as well as Hale Woodruff, who taught at New York University - gathered in Greenwich Village to debate the question of whether and how to insert the politics of race into their work. Did doing so misuse art? Did it diminish politics? Was it self-aggrandizing? Self-isolating? Did it do any good?

These questions are all pertinent to artists now, including those who may be considering adding their names to next week's art strike. The Spiral Group concluded that there was too much at stake for them not to take a stand as artists: Do it, and see what unfolds. So they changed their art and put together a political show. Their example still holds.

Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965
Through April 1 at Grey Art Gallery, New York University; 212-998-6780, greyartgallery.nyu.edu.

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11. Susan Mogul, FF Alumn, at University of Washington, Seattle, Jan. 19

Critical Issues in Contemporary Art Practice
Lecture Series

This lecture series takes place over seven Thursday evenings during winter quarter. It is organized by the School of Art + Art History + Design with support from the Henry Art Gallery. The general public is invited to sit alongside degree-seeking individuals studying fine art to share ideas and raise questions about contemporary art and its place in society and our imaginations.

2017 lectures are sponsored by the Boeing Company.

All lectures take place in the auditorium of the Henry Art Gallery at 7pm. They are free, but registration is recommended to reserve a seat. Registration links for February and March lectures will be added to this page later.

Speakers

January 12 - Melanie Gilligan - register

January 19 - Susan Mogul - register

January 26 - Rhea Anastas - register

February 9 - Cameron Rowland

February 16 - Hannah Black

February 23 - Wendy Red Star

January 12 - Lise Soskolne (W.A.G.E.)

Henry Art Gallery
University of Washington
15th Ave NE and NE 41st St
Seattle, WA 98195
+1 (206) 543 2280
info@henryart.org

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12. Shaun Leonardo, FF Alumn, at Assembly, Brooklyn, thru Oct. 12

Assembly
an arts-based diversion program for court-involved youth organized in partnership with Recess and Brooklyn Justice Initiatives

Launching: Thursday, January 12 | Public hours: Thursday - Saturday, 12-6pm
370 Schermerhorn Street | Brooklyn, NY
Assembly is a nine-month pilot program operating from the Recess satellite space in Downtown Brooklyn. To expand upon its mission to connect artists and publics, Assembly will offer an arts-based diversion program, which presents an alternative to incarceration and other adult sanctions for court-involved youth. After participants complete the program, prosecutors may close and seal their case, avoiding an adult record.

The program is presented in partnership with Brooklyn Justice Initiatives, who recruits program participants at the court level, and Shaun Leonardo, the program's lead teaching artist and organizer. Leonardo will be joined by Salome Asega and Sable Elyse Smith who will serve as teaching artists in the spring and summer, respectively.

In addition to this dedicated program, Assembly will grant each artist the opportunity to activate and add to the front gallery space cumulatively, working toward an evolving installation rather than a static exhibition. Program participants will have the opportunity to create a final project and curate a final exhibition combining their own work with that of the artists.

Assembly is invested in reframing narratives around the criminal justice system with and for court-involved participants, but in order to effect change in this pressing arena, there is a need to reframe the dominant story and language for everyone, regardless of one's proximity to the system. As such, Leonardo's project will include a series of public workshops modeling the same curriculum employed during the diversion program. Artists, educators, and members of the public are invited to participate in these sessions; please email info@recessactivities.org for more information.

Assembly Gallery Activation: Shaun Leonardo
For the initial cycle of the program, from January-April, 2017, Leonardo's own body of work will occupy the street-level, public storefront gallery. Leonardo's videos, drawings, and documentation of his performance art will be present in the gallery and will also be used as a jumping off point for discussion during the educational diversion programs.

At the core of Leonardo's project-as it unfolds both in the front gallery and during program sessions-will be a seamless treatment of artistic and educative practice. To this end, the formal layout of the adjacent classroom and gallery will be porous, and an ideology of alternative pedagogy will pervade the entirety of the space. Leonardo will have custom seating and storage fabricated to redefine the priorities of critical inquiry and to provide a counterpoint to furniture typically found in learning institutions; rather than connoting uniformity and institutional homogeneity, the furnishings and arrangement of the space will welcome a variety of subject positions and learning styles. Visitors to Assembly will, therefore, be encouraged to adapt new positions and language in order to describe a justice system that rejects popular notions of criminality.

After his three-month gallery activation, Leonardo will remain the lead educator of the Assembly diversion program for the full duration of the nine-month pilot.

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13. Buzz Spector, FF Alumn, at Brentwood Arts Exchange, Riverdale, MD, opening January 21, and more

Drawn Out, Drawn Over: Mapping the Territory of Experience
Curated by Nicole Brugnoli
January 16-March 11, 2017
opening on Saturday, January 21st

Artists: Carmon Colangelo, Kathy Dlugos, Helen Frederick, Rebecca Kamen, Sergio Soave, Bev Ress, Walter Kravitz, Alan Crockett, Suuny Bellison, Casey Doyle, Carol Brode, Pati Beachley, Matt Pinney, Buzz Spector, Michael Pestel, Michael Mercil, and Carole Garmon

Brentwood Arts Exchange
6600 Kenilworth Avenue
Riverdale, MD 20737

Drawn Out, Drawn Over: Mapping the Territory of Experience aims to field a visual conversation about drawing approaches by featuring 10-15 selected artists living throughout the United States, most of who have had dedicated careers as academics. Their institutions range from small liberal arts colleges, community colleges, and some of the largest research institutions in the country. The artists have been selected from locations where the curator has lived over the past 15 years; Pittsburgh, PA, Columbus, OH and Washington, DC, and they range from emerging artists, at the beginning of their careers, to internationally renowned artists and academics in their given fields of expertise.

The exhibition expands the definition of drawing from the usual materials and processes to derivations in form and context therefore showcasing drawing-based new approaches to mark making, three dimensionality, and installation, digital and virtual concepts.

In relation to how these artists maintain their studio practices, they pursue careers in teaching, though this dual-career model has shifted radically in the last 10 years as tenure track positions are fewer and adjunct positions increase at unfathomable rates.

The contribution in the regions from each of these artists has played a role in developing important movements in contemporary drawing. The viewers will acquire an insight into various approaches to drawing and mark making generally unseen.

The complex concepts of mapping and experience as permutations of movement, memory, examination, geography, energy, investigation, recording, curiosity and play, will be platforms for the research for this exhibition. Drawing traditionally is a process often unseen to general audiences and usually exists to give vital form or structure to the artist's primary studio practice. It is as much process and making as it is play. Drawing is the pulse of most processes and the means to keep making when our work in academia or life commitments makes being in the studio challenging and sometimes impossible. Drawing, as a form or idea knocks down the physical walls of the studio, and opens up the world to critical examination at any moment in time. Line, text, mark, space and time are each separately and together, tools for making. Abstractions are capable of giving form to the observed reality of daily life and movement.

Each artist has been asked to create new work for this exhibition under the guise of these ideas, though honoring entirely their own pre-existing research. Drawn Out, Drawn Over: Mapping the Territory of Experience will deliver unique aesthetic and personal experimental works as a witness to how artists and academic pedagogies are now in play.

Nikki Brugnoli
George Mason University
School of Art Assistant Graduate Programs Coordinator
School of Art Faculty
Graduate Adviser
Coordinator, Lorton Workhouse Art Lab
Hamiltonian Mentor
nbrugnol@gmu.edu

and

A Certain Slant of Light
January 15 - February 25, 2017
Opening Reception: Sunday, January 15, 3 - 6pm
Guest Curated by Bill Conger and Shona Macdonald
"There's a certain slant of light On winter afternoons,
That oppresses like the weight Of cathedral tunes"
- Emily Dickinson

The work of this group of artists hopes to encapsulate the lyricism, fragility, and foreboding inherent in Dickinson's poem. Memory too, captured in Dickinson's vivid imagery, is present in much of this work: particularly the way memories unearth and dislodge, becoming different with age. Also, stillness and boredom where the imagination runs free, on days such as dreary, rain-soaked Sunday afternoons, as evoked in Dickinson's poem.

The poem's undercurrent of affliction illuminates something within the narrator herself. A supernatural heft within the four slight passages swells as the arbitrary and enigmatic slant of light transforms into a malevolent force of nature. The artists represented here amplify common visages and familiar objects while expounding on the implications. These artists similarly excavate content from the slightest stimuli either pictorially or through gesture. Their works yield psychically charged moments, which reference Dickinson's unequalled ability to exact underlying drama from arrested observation. - Shona Macdonald, Guest Curator

Artists in the Exhibition: Bill Conger, Natalie Jacobson, Shona Macdonald, Melissa Randall, Dawn Roe, Pete Schulte, Buzz Spector, and Dustin Young.

Riverside Arts Center
32 E. Quincy St.
Riverside, IL 60546
708-442-6400
rivarts@sbcglobal.net

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14. Victoria Keddie, Scott Kiernan, David Everitt Howe, FF Alumns, at Pioneer Works, Brooklyn, opening Feb. 10

E.S.P. TV: WORK
Feb 10 - March 26, 2017
Exhibition Opening: Feb 10th, 7-9pm

Pioneer Works is pleased to present WORK, E.S.P. TV's first institutional solo exhibition in the United States. Directed by Victoria Keddie and Scott Kiernan, E.S.P. TV is best known for their live television tapings that feature experimental broadcast collaborations with underground poets, musicians, and artists via their mobile television studio.

For WORK, E.S.P. TV makes Pioneer Works' office staff and environment the subject of a six-week performative, televisual installation by relocating the organization's second-floor, open-plan office to the first-floor's main exhibition space. Surrounded by a decentralized control room, the office doubles as both a dynamic sculptural set-painted partly in chroma blue and featuring movable walls, among other features-and the actual site for the staff's five-day workweek. The staff's "daily grind" will be mixed live, on-site, with custom video effects and commercial interruptions. Far from peddling in the sensational tropes of reality TV, WORK instead turns banal, day-to-day office routines and patterns-the movement of a chair, a co-worker getting coffee-into the improbable, playful content of a serial program to be broadcast weekly on the Manhattan Neighborhood Network. E.S.P. TV worked closely with curator David Everitt Howe to envision this social experiment and exhibition, which responding to the building's unique environment and tight-knit, collective office culture.

Recreated as a pastiche of a "contemporary" office, the installation features a series of sculptural set pieces that can be activated in real-time or through the video editing process. A camera crew, live TV mixing consoles, monitors, and program feeds surround and permeate the working office. At the start of each workday, Pioneer Works staff function as both employees and cast members who "log-in" to an evolving algorithm that combines their names anagrammatically with 32 production terms for various camera shots. The resulting text generates an abstract script or textual narrative that informs both the episodes' editing and their subtitles.

Working within galleries, museums, and artist-run and public spaces, E.S.P. TV's television programs are taped before a live audience and place the labor of production in an equal spotlight with the artists and performers with whom they collaborate. These tapings reveal a new space born through a breakdown in the hierarchy of the producer and performer and an investigation of the aesthetic qualities of the "live TV studio set"-arising from subtle relationships of staging, timing, layers of observation and the line between shadow and shade of an evenly lit set. In many ways, the humorous, inquisitive, and convention-defying nature of E.S.P. TV carries on the tradition of institutional critique artists like Michael Asher. In the 1970s, Asher engaged in an art practice that broke down the separation between traditional roles of art production, exhibition, and public dissemination. An influential touchstone for E.S.P TV's WORK is Ashers' Via Los Angeles (1976) in which Asher recorded, and later broadcast, the behind-the-scenes interior of a local TV control room (Portland NBC affiliate KGW) while they were airing the Super Bowl.

For additional context, WORK will feature video and printed ephemera from E.S.P. TV's first 100 Episodes and 6 seasons on air in New York City. This multi-media collection draws on hundreds of collaborative efforts with local and international artists working in performance, video, sound, social practice, and more. Evoking this history, as well as the history of television and sound, a series of public programs featuring screenings, panels, performance, and an artist-led "staff retreat" expound upon the major themes of the exhibition and activate the set outside of normal working hours.

Work was curated by David Everitt Howe, Curator/Editor at Pioneer Works.

About E.S.P. TV
Directed by Scott Kiernan and Victoria Keddie, E.S.P. TV utilizes a mobile television studio to explore transmission, analog and digital media, and broadcast. Through an ongoing series of live television taping events, they place the control room of the TV studio center stage, making the means of production into a vehicle for performance. Producing over 85 live taping events and over 100 episodes since 2010, E.S.P. TV has worked with various venues and institutions including: the Whitney Museum of American Art, New Museum, The Museum of Arts and Design, Swiss Institute/Contemporary Art, Printed Matter, Millennium Film Workshop, New School, Recess, Camera Club, Hunter College Art Galleries (New York, NY); Interstate Projects, Spectacle Theater, Issue Project Room, Pioneer Works, Knockdown Center, Flux Factory, Roulette (Brooklyn, NY), Queens Museum (Queens, NY), Harvard Art Museums, Franklin Street Works (Stamford, CT), Liminal Space (Oakland, CA), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), Human Resources (Los Angeles, CA), Ballroom Marfa, Marfa Public Radio, (Marfa, TX), Museum of Human Achievement (Austin, TX), S1 (Portland, OR), Nightingale Cinema (Chicago, IL), Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, General Public (Berlin), STORE (Dresden), Studio XX (Montreal), SAW Media Centre (Ottawa), Kling and Bang Gallery (Reykjavik), and Pallas Projects (Dublin).

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15. M. Lamar, FF Alumn, in The New York Times, Jan. 12

The New York Times
MUSIC
A Goth Male Soprano Who Plumbs the Darkness
By ZACHARY WOOLFE
JAN. 12, 2017

What kind of music does M. Lamar play?
It's a simple question, but there's no easy answer. Mr. Lamar's lush and gloomy new show, "Funeral Doom Spiritual," is an assemblage of old spirituals - but it isn't your usual Sunday at church. And while he has over time trained his penetrating, whooping soprano register with the help of an opera coach, it isn't like any opera you've ever heard, either.
Mr. Lamar - who is the twin brother of Laverne Cox, the transgender "Orange Is the New Black" actress, and has appeared on that show as Ms. Cox's pretransition self - inhabits a musical genre pretty much his own. He embodies, as he put it in an interview after a rehearsal this week, a "gothic-devil-worshiping-free-black-man-blues tradition." He plays death soul. Or maybe blues metal. Or maybe apocalyptic lieder gospel.
The hourlong "Funeral Doom Spiritual," which has its New York premiere on Friday at National Sawdust in Brooklyn as part of the Prototype festival of contemporary music theater, is fueled by the anger and sadness of the Black Lives Matter movement. But instead of explicit protest, this otherworldly, goth-tinged projection into the distant future of our violent, racially and sexually charged present offers a space of melancholic, alluring, ultimately stirring reflection.

Charting the stylized journey of a man mourning the loss of his love, "Funeral Doom Spiritual" follows him over the centuries as he hopes for a resurrection. The songs' lyrics may describe movements from life to death, but the work tries to reverse that course, seeking a state that Mr. Lamar calls deathlessness.

"What the dead gotta say," he sings at one point. "They say, 'Don't give up on me.'"
While the focus of the piece is the gangly, black-draped Mr. Lamar, 32, sitting at the piano and singing, no singer-songwriter has ever sounded quite like this, unless you've imagined the love child of Tori Amos and Marilyn Manson.

But he does have antecedents and contemporaries. His malleable, ferocious voice and his taste for despondent political contemplation may remind you of the transgender singer Anohni and the anti-AIDS siren Diamanda Galás. Trippy and unhurried, his compositions echo black avant-garde jazz masters like Cecil Taylor, Sun Ra, John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman. And two young artists, the soprano Julia Bullock and the composer Tyshawn Sorey, recently created an evening of Josephine Baker arrangements that slowed her songs into a desolation as glacial as that of "Funeral Doom Spiritual."

The new piece has its roots in Mr. Lamar's childhood in Alabama, where he was a boy soprano in his church choir. He grew up obsessed with the opera stars Leontyne Price, Jessye Norman and Marian Anderson, imitating their style.
Mr. Lamar hung around with the musicians in school but initially followed a visual art path. He enrolled in graduate studies in sculpture at the Yale School of Art before dropping out when his dabbling in performance began turning more serious. He moved to San Francisco and then, in 2006, to New York to study with Ira Siff, a noted vocal coach who is still his teacher and was for years the chief diva of the lovingly campy drag opera troupe La Gran Scena.

"We go a lot through diction and enunciation," Mr. Lamar said. "Like, pronouncing things when you're singing with a bel canto line is a thing. You want a beautiful sound but also to always be intelligible. And lots and lots of scales and technique so the voice has dexterity, has flexibility, has movement between registers."

He started off writing individual songs; they gradually gathered into larger pieces, mostly set in the historical past of slave ships and the Jim Crow era, but clearly resonant with our current moment. When his multimedia work "Negrogothic, a Manifesto, the Aesthetics of M. Lamar" was presented in 2014 at the Manhattan gallery Participant Inc., Ken Johnson wrote in The New York Times that he "plumbs the depths of all-American trauma with visionary verve."

"Funeral Doom Spiritual" arose as Mr. Lamar was singing one of his favorite spirituals: the gently defiant "My Lord, What a Morning," a Marian Anderson calling card (and the title of her autobiography). Hearing the words as if for the first time, he asked himself, using notably sharper language: What the hell was this about?

He researched the lyrics online and found alternate versions. "I realized, oh, it's this end-times thing, like when the Rapture comes," he said. "And I thought, wouldn't it be lovely if it had a setting, a piano setting, that reflected that content?"

The idea of a doomsday spiritual dovetailed with what he called "this Negro zombie apocalypse idea I'd had," an extension of concepts he'd been exploring in works like "Negro Antichrist" and a requiem, "Speculum Orum: Shackled to the Dead." He found common ground in an image from the work of the legal scholar Anthony Paul Farley: "The idea that the dead are singing means that they're not really dead," Mr. Lamar said. "They're asleep, which always leaves the possibility of waking."

Dark costumes with executioner-style hoods and projected film images of lynching trees and burning cities echo the boiling music. The visuals have continued to develop through a stretch of workshops (under names that included "Destruction" and "The Demon Rising") and since the official premiere last spring at the University of Southern California.

"In order for me to get to this stage of a piece," Mr. Lamar said, "I have to play it a lot. Not just rehearse it, but actually perform it a lot."

However you classify it, the work exerts a strange, dark power. At the rehearsal, in a cramped studio a few blocks south of Penn Station, Mr. Lamar and a small ensemble read through "Oh, Graveyard," a combination of trembling piano, rueful string quartet harmonies and spidery electronics. His wailing falsetto turned repeated phrases into a keening litany.

"There is this thing where you're singing well when you feel sort of superhuman," he said a few minutes later. "And it doesn't happen in the low register. It happens up high.

You're in the stratosphere. You can transcend any muckiness of the world."

Funeral Doom Spiritual
Friday and Saturday at National Sawdust in Brooklyn; nationalsawdust.org.
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/12/arts/music/m-lamar-goth-male-soprano-prototype-opera-festival.html?_r=0

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16. Emma Amos, Simone Forti, Mimi Gross, Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, Yoko Ono, Melissa Rachleff, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, Jan. 12

The New York Times
ART & DESIGN | ART REVIEW
When Artists Ran the Show: 'Inventing Downtown,' at N.Y.U.
By HOLLAND COTTER
JAN. 12, 2017

When a call went out online recently for an art world protest strike - "no work, no school, no business" - on Inauguration Day, more than 200 artists, most based in New York, many well known, quickly signed on. In numbers, they represent a mere fraction of the present art world, and there was reason to expect the list would grow. By contrast, in New York in the 1950s, 200 artists pretty much were that world, and one divided into several barely tangent circles.

That era's cultural geometry has been badly in need of study, and now it's getting some in a labor-of-love exhibition called "Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965," at the Grey Art Gallery at New York University. With nearly 230 objects, it's big and has its share of stars. But it's not a masterpiece display. It's something almost better: a view of typical - rather than outstanding - art, of familiar artists looking unfamiliar, and of strangers you're glad to meet. It looks the way history looks before the various MoMAs get their sanitizing hands on it: funky, diverse, down to earth, with things to teach us now.

By 1952, Abstract Expressionism was the big American deal, the art that won the culture war with Europe. Americans like muscle, ego and size, all of which Ab Ex had. The market likes brands, and will create them where it can, and did so in the case of Ab Ex, which made many people, including the uptown Manhattan dealers who sold it, quite happy.

Not everyone was thrilled. Not all artists were. Some itched to have success as part of the trend but couldn't quite figure out how. Others were tired of abstraction; they wanted to paint people and nature, tell stories, or try out crazy new forms that merged art and theater. For still others, politics, and art's expression of it, was of primary concern. The only guaranteed way these artists could achieve their goals was by opening galleries of their own, and they did.

The earliest of these 1950s artist-run galleries were downtown, on or around 10th Street, east of Fourth Avenue, where rents were cheap. The Grey show, organized by Melissa Rachleff, a clinical associate professor at the New York University Steinhardt School of Art, features 14 such spaces, a few of which lasted for years, others for just a few months.

The most stable were the so-called cooperative galleries, or co-ops, established by groups of artists who paid monthly dues to cover rent, pitched in on running the place, and made joint decisions about membership: whom to bring in, and whom to kick out. In return for their commitments, they could, on a rotating schedule, show their art.

The earliest of the three co-ops covered by the show, Tanager Gallery, was also the longest-lived, surviving from 1952 to 1962. And it was the one with the most market-friendly aesthetic, a little something for all tastes. Samples of work by members range from realism (a 1959 double portrait by Alex Katz of his wife, Ada), to semi-abstraction (Lois Dodd's wonderful 1958 picture of three caramel-colored cows), to the full-on gestural painting of Charles Cajori, Fred Mitchell and Perle Fine.

As is true throughout the show, there are memorable discoveries here. One is a sculpture: a splendid wood figure carving by Mary Frank, suggesting the form of a dancer, which Ms. Frank was. The other find is Jean Follett, whose ghostly assemblage painting, "3 Black Bottles," is in a world of its own. Tanager's gestural painters would have fit right in at uptown galleries, and aspired to. But in the 1950s, Ms. Follett, who after early success left New York, was still looking for a receptive place to land.

She found one in 1952 at Hansa Gallery. It was named for Hans Hofmann, a revered teacher who, although himself an abstract painter, encouraged his students to experiment in other styles and media. So did the gallery's young director, Richard Bellamy, who would later champion Pop and Minimalism. Their venturesome tastes may account for the variety of work in this section of the show, from Jane Wilson's vivid portrait painting of a fellow artist, Jane Freilicher, to a photograph of an early environment by Allan Kaprow, who paved the way for Conceptualism.

The third co-op, the Brata Gallery, brought some racial and ethnic diversity into the 10th Street picture. Ed Clark, fresh from Paris, was one of the very few African-American artists exhibiting in New York. And he holds the banner of abstraction high here with a picture that's basically a giant swoosh of pink. (He has a solo show at Tilton Gallery on the Upper East Side through Feb. 18.) Brata also exhibited the Japanese-born Nanae Momiyama - two of her tiny ink paintings are here - and mounted one of the most successful downtown shows of the day in the American solo debut of Yayoi Kusama, whose hypnotic and enveloping paintings caused a sensation.

That was in 1960, by which point other kinds of galleries, alternatives to the alternatives, finding 10th Street too conservative and rejecting the co-op model, had sprouted up downtown. And these spaces, scrappy and scrappily documented, are the most interesting of all.

Reuben Gallery acted a bit like a co-op - it had a steady schedule of shows - but its thinking was loose enough to accommodate Mr. Kaprow's audience-participation happenings, and the street-junk pageants of Red Grooms. In 1958 Mr. Grooms opened a space of his own, called City Gallery, in his West 24th Street studio. It lasted barely six months but presented a much-talked-about group drawing show. Ms. Rachleff has tracked down more than 20 of the original 45 works, among them a luminous Emily Mason pastel and two fantastical street scenes by Mimi Gross (who would later marry Mr. Grooms). The gifted painter Bob Thompson, dead from drugs at 29, showed here. So did the undersung Robert Beauchamp, and the poet and scholar of African art George Nelson Preston, who has a retrospective at Kenkeleba House in the East Village through Monday.

That project ended when Mr. Grooms had to move, and he started another, the Delancey Street Museum, in a deserted boxing gym on the Lower East Side. There he realized some of his own most ambitious theater pieces, and also presented a solo by the painter Marcia Marcus, now obscure, who has a way-ahead-of-its-time self-portrait at the Grey. Similarly, Judson Gallery, in a basement near Washington Square, is remembered chiefly for Claes Oldenburg's early, hair-raising performances, but was just as important for introducing painters like Marcus Ratliff and the outstandingly interesting - where can we see more of her? - Martha Edelheit.

And, fleetingly, artist-run galleries popped up way downtown, near the financial district. In the winter of 1960, Yoko Ono opened her studio-loft at 112 Chambers Street to experimental composers like La Monte Young and choreographers like Simone Forti. In 1963 a bunch of Bay Area artists settled, commune-style, in a tenement at 79 Park Place, near City Hall. They lived rough, but the hard-edged paintings produced by Tamara Melcher and Leo Valledor are as neat and clean as can be.

But long before then, downtown had moved uptown. Hansa had done a five-year stint on Central Park South, hoping to attract collectors from the commercial art district nearby. In 1960 a start-up space, Green Gallery, set up shop on 57th Street and projected a downtown ambience, thanks to its quixotic director, Mr. Bellamy. He was a downtown type if ever there was one, as is made clear in Judith E. Stein's engrossing 2016 biography, but Green Gallery was firmly in the business of doing business. In positioning Pop and Minimalism as the next art success stories, it worked with priorities that the more radical downtown spaces had resisted.

It was those spaces, where downtown existed as a state of mind as much as a place, that held my attention longest. This was partly because some were new to me, but also because their thinking seemed vital in a way that Green Gallery's did not. March Gallery, on 10th Street, was an example. Run by Boris Lurie, a Holocaust survivor, with his fellow artist Sam Goodman and a poet, Stanley Fisher, it approached art not as an ornament but as an ethical argument, a response to racism and greed. Wordy and space-hogging, their paintings seemed pitched to outshout and outbully consumer culture.

Their populist approach inspired the artist Aldo Tambellini to locate his alternative space, the Center, in the East Village streets, where people would participate in, and contribute to, his art, whether they meant to or not. The same crowdsourced ideal led the artist Phyllis Yampolsky, in 1961, to establish the Hall of Issues, a space at Judson Church where anyone, from community activists to neighborhood kids, could post bulletin-board style comments on matters that concerned them. The space, in place for two years, was a prototype for the "subway therapy" installation of thousands of handwritten sticky notes that covered a wall of the Union Square Station after the 2016 presidential election.
And there's the Spiral Group, which originated just before the 1963 March on Washington, when several African-American artists - among them Emma Amos, Romare Bearden and Norman Lewis, as well as Hale Woodruff, who taught at New York University - gathered in Greenwich Village to debate the question of whether and how to insert the politics of race into their work. Did doing so misuse art? Did it diminish politics? Was it self-aggrandizing? Self-isolating? Did it do any good?

These questions are all pertinent to artists now, including those who may be considering adding their names to next week's art strike. The Spiral Group concluded that there was too much at stake for them not to take a stand as artists: Do it, and see what unfolds. So they changed their art and put together a political show. Their example still holds.
Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965
Through April 1 at Grey Art Gallery, New York University; 212-998-6780, greyartgallery.nyu.edu.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/12/arts/design/when-artists-ran-the-show-inventing-downtown-at-nyu.html

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17. Crash, Daze, Lady Pink, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, Jan. 12

HENRY CHALFANT
Through Jan. 21. Eric Firestone Gallery, 4 Great Jones Street, Manhattan; 917-324-3386, ericfirestonegallery.com.

Few artists have a connection to art history the way graffitists who knew Henry Chalfant did. A short film included in "Henry Chalfant: 1980" at Eric Firestone shows how, after "bombing" a subway car with aerosol paint, graffitists would leave a message for Mr. Chalfant with a precise description of the subway line, car and nature of the work they had just made. Mr. Chalfant would then grab his 35-millimeter camera and document it before transit authorities could buff the train.

The photographs here are the result of that relationship - particularly centered on the events of April 1980, when an 11-day strike by transportation workers gave artists extraordinary access to the subway system. One wall shows the original prints, which Mr. Chalfant pieced together by hand to recreate a facsimile of the work. The rest of the gallery is filled with rows and rows of digital versions: 150 subway cars of brightly colored mobile murals by Blade, Crash, Daze, Futura, Mare, Skeme and others. (Lady Pink is the only woman in the exhibition.)

These subway friezes became signature emblems of New York. Thanks to Mr. Chalfant and others, like Martha Cooper, the ephemeral work was preserved in photographs. Sure, it was illegal. But graffiti art has become one of the most globally recognizable and copied forms of contemporary culture. And in the realm of creative civil disobedience, it is one of the most extraordinary instances of a bunch of young, working-class artists affecting the world.

MARTHA SCHWENDENER

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/12/arts/design/what-to-see-in-new-york-art-galleries-this-week.html

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18. R. Sikoryak, FF Alumn, at JHU Comics, Manhattan, Jan. 20

Introducing:

"THE UNQUOTABLE TRUMP"
by R. Sikoryak

Parodies of comic book covers with actual Trump quotes from the 2016 presidential campaign.

The mini comic edition also features a Public Service Announcement comic strip and extensive footnotes.

Images posted on Tumblr:
https://unquotabletrump.tumblr.com

Mini comic available via mail order:
https://www.birdcagebottombooks.com/products/the-unquotable-trump

Signing copies of the mini comic:
Friday, Jan 20, 6-8 pm
JHU COMIC BOOKS
32 EAST 32ND STREET
NEW YORK NY 10016
http://www.jhucomicbooks.com/index.html
https://www.facebook.com/events/697577703735111/
http://twitter.com/RSikoryak

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19. Lisa Kron, FF Alumn, receives Kleban Prize for Musical Theater

The New York Times
THEATER
Lisa Kron Awarded Kleban Prize for Musical Theater
By ANDREW R. CHOW
JAN. 16, 2017

Lisa Kron and Daniel Zaitchik have been awarded the 2017 Kleban Prizes for writing in musical theater.

Ms. Kron, 55, who already has an impressive body of work, won for most promising musical theater librettist. She won two Tony Awards in 2015 for writing the book and lyrics of "Fun Home," a Broadway hit about a lesbian cartoonist dealing with her father's suicide. Previously, she wrote and performed in memoir-driven plays including "Well" and "2.5 Minute Ride." (She was eligible for the award because her work has been on Broadway for less than two years; "Fun Home" ran for a year and a half.)

Mr. Zaitchik, 36, won for most promising musical theater lyricist. He is a composer-playwright whose projects, including "Picnic at Hanging Rock," have been developed at Lincoln Center Theater and Ars Nova. He is also a recording singer-songwriter and has acted Off Broadway.

The judges this year were the songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez; the actress Mary Testa; and the producer Ira Weitzman. The prize comes with $100,000; previous winners include Jason Robert Brown ("Parade"); Jeff Marx and Mr. Lopez ("Avenue Q"); and Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak ("A Gentleman's Guide to Love & Murder").
The Kleban Foundation was established in 1988 in the will of Edward Kleban, a composer and lyricist who won a Tony and a Pulitzer for "A Chorus Line."

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20. Laurie Carlos, Jessica Hagedorn, Robbie McCauley, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, Jan. 12

The New York Times
THEATER
Laurie Carlos, Actress in 'For Colored Girls,' Dies at 67
By WILLIAM GRIMES
JAN. 12, 2017

Laurie Carlos, an actor who appeared in the original production of Ntozake Shange's acclaimed poetic drama "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf" and a playwright whose work expressed the inner lives of black women in the United States, died on Dec. 29 in St. Paul. She was 67.

The cause was colon cancer, her daughter, Ambersunshower Smith, said.

Ms. Carlos joined the cast of "Colored Girls" in 1975 when it was gestating at bars on the Lower East Side. She followed it on its journey from the New Federal Theater to the Public Theater to the Booth Theater on Broadway, and onward to a television adaptation seen on the PBS series "American Playhouse" in 1982.

As the Lady in Blue, she was one of seven characters telling stories of love, loss and the patriarchy in a fusion of dance and declamation that Ms. Shange called a "choreopoem." Ms. Carlos enacted the poetic monologues "Abortion Cycle #1," "I Used to Live in the World" and "No More Love Poems #3" and appeared in ensemble pieces throughout the play.

In 1977 The Village Voice gave an Obie Award to Ms. Carlos and the rest of the cast, as well as to Ms. Shange and the play's director, Oz Scott.

After appearing in Ms. Shange's "Spell #7" and Edgar White's "Les Femmes Noir" at the Public Theater, Ms. Carlos branched out into writing, directing and performance art. Her plays "Nonsectarian Conversations With the Dead" (1985), "Organdy Falsetto" (1987) and "White Chocolate for My Father" (1990) were abstract, associative dramas that fused politics and poetry as they delineated the predicaments of black women.

From the outset, she was clear about her aims. "In America, in the early '60s, the voices of black people were very minimalized," she told Bomb magazine in 1993. "I wanted to be able to use my voice as an artist for political reasons as well as aesthetic reasons. The two are not very far apart."

She was born Laurie Dorothea Smith on Jan. 25, 1949, in Manhattan, and grew up in public housing on Avenue D on the Lower East Side. Her father, Walter, was a drummer. Her mother, the former Mildred Randall, was a postal worker.

In Ms. Smith's early teens she began acting with Mobilization for Youth, a social-services agency on the Lower East Side. After graduating from the High School for the Performing Arts, she studied with Lloyd Richards at the Negro Ensemble Company, where she worked as an usher.

Harry Belafonte noticed her work and hired her to train as a casting agent at his production company, Belafonte Enterprises.

She took the name Carlos from a man with whom she had a short romantic relationship. His full name is unknown. In addition to her daughter, she is survived by three sisters, Donna, Riki and Neveley Smith; a half sister, Tanya Foster; three half brothers, Warren and Walter Smith and Iya Mariano Malango; and three grandchildren.

In the late 1980s Ms. Carlos joined Robbie McCauley and Jessica Hagedorn to form Thought Music, a performance-art group that created the updated minstrel show "Teenytown" at Franklin Furnace in 1988.

Ms. Carlos won two New York Dance and Performance Awards, also known as the Bessies. The first came in 1989 for her performance in the two-part multimedia production "Heat," which she directed with Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, the founder of the dance company Urban Bush Women. In 1993 she was given a Bessie as creator and choreographer of "White Chocolate for My Father," presented at Performance Space 122.

In 1998, Ms. Carlos moved to St. Paul to become an artistic fellow with the Penumbra Theater Company. She played an important role in encouraging new playwrights and performers through Naked Stages, a fellowship program based at the Pillsbury House Theater, and through the theater's Late Nite Series, which featured new work by artists from New York and Minnesota.

She gave her final performance this past fall at In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theater in St. Paul, narrating "Queen," a play about gun violence and the Black Lives Matter movement.

"She put the world as she knew it onstage with real style and understanding," Lou Bellamy, the founder of Penumbra, told The Minneapolis Star-Tribune after her death, "and she lived her art."

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21. John Ahearn, Anton Van Dalen, FF Alumns, at James Fuentes Gallery, Manhattan, thru Jan. 29

The show, "Group Exhibition 2017" will be up until January 29 at James Fuentes at 55 Delancey Street, Manhattan.

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22. Annie Lanzillotto, FF Alumn, at Sidewalk Café, Manhattan, Feb. 18, and more

FF Alumn Annie Lanzillotto reads: Sat Feb 4th, 1:00 pm at the Allen Ginsberg Poetry Award Reading: Passaic County Community College. FIRST PRIZE Annie Lanzillotto, "Diminished Capacity, an Indictment"
Poetry Center / Hamilton Club Building, 32 Church Street, Paterson, New Jersey 07505 http://www.poetrycenterpccc.com.
and Saturday February 18th, 2017 at "Italian American Writers Association" reading at the Sidewalk Cafe, 94 Avenue A, (at 6th Street), East Village, 5:30pm sign-up for open mic. Admission: $8.00 includes a drink.

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23. Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful, FF Alumn, at Critical Practices/21st Projects, Manhattan, Jan. 27 and more

Critical Practices Inc. and 21ST.PROJECTS are pleased to host a series of collaborative and performative works Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful.
The first event is Thursday, January 27, beginning at 7pm.

Please note that this event is limited to 15 participants who register on a first come first served basis. We will send the address and an acknowledgement
of participation to the first 15 who RSVP.

Please note that no cell phones or any electronic devices are allowed during the session.

The P Word is a process-based experiment that rethinks the exhibition space as a playground where the performative is allowed to thrive away from the constrains imposed by visual documentation and instead just be. Concurrently, all possible attempts to turn the art experience into a material object are counteracted by the slippery nature of the seemingly absurd activities comprising the program, as well as by their communal format. And other than the publication that will record in writing some of the conversations and moments that will emerge along the way, all other aspects of The P Word are to be recalled from one's memory.

The P Word dispels the need for art, specifically performance art, to rely on audiences and viewers, as it requires every potential voyeur to become a co-creator. It also challenges the unquestioned system that keeps funneling an endless supply of art goods, as opposed to experiences, onto our already burdened planet.

Please see the attached invitation for more information.

Best regards,
Sara Reisman

Critical Practices Inc. and 21ST.PROJECTS is pleased to host a series of performative and collaborative works by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful.

The P Word
is a process-based experiment that rethinks the exhibition space as a playground where the performative is allowed to thrive away from the constrains imposed by visual documentation and instead just be. Con-currently, all possible attempts to turn the art experience into a material object are counteracted by the slippery nature of the seemingly absurd activities comprising the program, as well as by their communal format. And other than the publication that will record in writing some of the conversations and moments that will emerge along the way, all other aspects of The P Word are to be recalled from one's memory.
The P Word dispels the need for art, specifically performance art, to rely on audiences and viewers, as it requires every potential voyeur to become a co-creator. It also challenges the unquestioned system that keeps funneling an endless supply of art goods, as opposed to experiences, onto our already burdened planet.
PROGRAM

a. January 27, 2017 @ 7:00pm
(reservations for 15 people maximum)
Nicolás Dumit Estévez
Putting a handful of unbleached flour on one's face while sketching celestial bodies and
eating organic cauliflower
Admission fee:
For one: a ready to eat item that has two distinct colors
For two: a ready to eat item that has more than two distinct colors
For three: a ready to eat item that has more than three distinct colors
Nicolás invites a small group to join in a one-time improvisational encounter that approaches art as part of a larger cosmological experience called life. This event is meant to develop into an embodied conversation of a collaborative nature involving all of those attending. The outcome of this gathering is shaped in situ by the participants' stories, intellectual contributions, bodily movements, and performative gestures.
Putting a handful of unbleached flour on one's face while sketching celestial bodies and eating organic cauliflower ask participants to inhabit the tensional chasm keeping art-life, audience-performer, among others binaries, at a distance from each other. Likewise, it offers those involved the opportunity to open themselves up to that which does not care to be defined or categorized, but simply lived.
BIOGRAPHY
Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful treads an elusive path that manifests itself performatively or through experi-ences where the quotidian and art overlap. He has exhibited and performed extensively in the U.S. as well as internationally. Residencies attended include P.S. 1/MoMA, Yaddo, The Center for Book Arts, and the MacDowell Colony. Estévez Raful Holds an MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA; and an MA from Union Theological Seminary. Publications include Pleased to Meet You, Life as Mate¬rial for Art and Vice Versa (editor), and For Art's Sake. He is the founding director of The Mangú Museum (pronounced man-goo). Estévez Raful was born in Santiago de los Treinta Caballeros, Dominican Republic.In 2011 he was baptized as a Bronxite; a citizen of the Bronx.
Support for this exhibition comes from a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Emergency Grant
Critical Practices Inc. is a response to the complex and changing conditions that affect the emergence of new practices and ideas within the field of cultural production. By means of artists projects (21ST.PROJECTS) and roundtables discussions (LaTableRonde), Critical Practices seeks to provide platforms for the exchange of the diverse points of views necessary for the evaluation of those current critical, theoretical, and practical objectives that impact cultural production.

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24. Agnes Denes, FF Alumn, receives Save the Earth Award from The United Nations

AWARD
Agnes Denes receives "Save the Earth" Award from the United Nations for her work on "Future Forests"

"In recognition of your outstanding contribution to the "Save the Earth" Green Corp Exhibition at the UN Headquarters in New York, Sept 16 to fight against desertification and achieve land-degradation neutrality, on behalf of the co-hosts of the exhibition, "Future Forests", UNCCD, WFUNA and Korea Foundation, I hereby award this certificate to

AGNES DENES

Ambassador Byong Hyon Kwon,
President of FUTURE FORESTS
Host of the exhibition UNCCD Drylands
United Nation
Sept. 27, 2016

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25. Nancy Azara, FF Member, at Soho20 Gallery, Brooklyn, Feb. 3

(RE)PRESENT: A Feminist Dialogue Across Generations
Friday, Feb 3, 6-8pm
Soho20 Gallery, 56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206 (718) 366-3661
"Making Art in An Oppressive Political Climate"
This is precisely the time when artists go to work - not when everything is fine, but in times of dread. That's our job! . . . We speak, we write, we do language. That is how civilizations heal.
Toni Morrison's "No Place for Self-Pity, No Room for Fear" was first published in The Nation Magazine (2004), following the presidential re-election of George W. Bush. After Trump's election, it has been reposted, retweeted and reprinted in The Nation's 150th Anniversary Special Issue.
https://www.thenation.com/article/no-place-self-pity-no-room-fear/
Come and join our discussion.
(RE)PRESENT 2017, what do we want from Feminism and how can we achieve it? Continuing in the tradition of the New York Feminist Art Institute, NYFAI (1979-1990) www.nyfai.org. An event of The Feminist Art Project. Everyone is welcome. For more information and upcoming events visit http://www.nyfai.org/currentactivities.html

Directions: L Train to Morgan Street, stay in back of train and exit at Bogart Street. The gallery is directly across the street.

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26. Claire Jeanine Satin, FF Alumn, at Palm Beach Convention Center, FL, Jan. 18-21

CLAIRE JEANINE SATIN

Will be exhibiting her work at the Palm Beach Art Fair, January 18-21, 2017 at the Palm Beach Convention Center with the WHITESPACE
COLLECTION'S COL-LECT. All Welcome!

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27. Bob Holman, Nina Kuo, Warren Lehrer, Lorin Roser, FF Alumns, at Central Booking, Manhattan, Jan. 19-22

WEEK OF PROTEST

A Happening at CENTRAL BOOKING

January 19 - January 22, 2017

In the tradition of 'happenings' of the 1960's, CENTRAL BOOKING is holding a Week of Protest against the incoming presidential administration during our scheduled gallery hours (noon to 6:00 PM) from Thursday, January 19 through Sunday, January 22. Organized by Maddy Rosenberg, the Week of Protest encompasses a range of artwork and performances in both OffLINE at CENTRAL BOOKING and outdoors in front of the gallery, where invited artists will contribute work that reflects the current atmosphere of apprehension and foreboding. Included in the week are ongoing interactive art, musical performances and performance art. The space will function as a site for general discussion, dissent and protest.

The Week of Protest is intended as a series of art actions to coincide with the presidential inauguration on Friday, January 20 as well as the #J20 ART STRIKE set for inauguration day. In solidarity with the art community, CENTRAL BOOKING joins artists, art organizations and galleries as we close our doors for the strike on January 20.

Participants in the Week of Protest include:
Concetta Abbate, Sally Apfelbaum, Marcy Brafman, Mark Staff Brandl, Brandstifter, Jan Castro, Elena Costelian, Steve Dalachinsky, Tessa Grundon, Martha Hayden, Art Hazelwood, Huisi He, Robin Holder, Bob Holman, Nina Kuo, Warren Lehrer, Sandra March, Dylan McManus, Margot Niederland, Arthur Polendo, Omar Olivera, Anne Reichlin, Lorin Roser, Jeff Rothstein, Marcia Scanlon, Sarah Stengle, Melissa Stern, David Tamura, Ashley Yang-Thompson, Michael Kelly Williams, Diana Wege, Robert Zott

Performance schedule includes:

Thursday:
12pm Artists hang their work on the walls and in the OffLINE space, ready to discuss their work, encourage participation and camaraderie

2pm Ashley Yang-Thompson uses text and image for a poetic street protest

5pm Jan Castro performs a set of original Bardic Protest songs with Concetta Abbate, which may end with hot oldies from Blake & Ginsberg

Sunday:
1pm Lorin Roser on banjo and David Tamura on saxophone are joined by performance artist Huisi He, incorporating the work of Nina Kuo, and poets Bob Holman and Steve Dalachinsky

3pm Elena Costelian flies in from Paris to add a voice from the outside with her Waste Paper for the Blind accompanied by musical track

5pm The week will end with a participatory smashing of Arthur Polendo's five-foot piñata of Trump

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28. Jay Critchley, FF Alumn, now online

I returned recently from the Los Angeles Sociometry Fair where I performed a piece, Don't Be Crude: H2O-I-L. This book documents these fairs, including my work, which since 1996, have followed the quadrennial Presidential Elections & Olympiads. is agents document guerilla sociometry - socialartist propaganda, pranktivist action, and interventionist art on tri-fold displays - documenting is's perpetual theme: "individuals and their relationship to groups".

is EMANCIPATION, edited by Zoe Larkins and Institute of Sociometry "is" founder Peter Miles Bergman, is a 130 page book with 2-color letterpress covers printed and hand-bound with a Japanese stitch in an edition of 200. http://www.jaycritchley.com/h2o-i-l.html

Jay Critchley
www.jaycritchley.com

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29. Edward M. Gomez, FF Alumn, now online

New York
Sat Jan 14, 2017

Greetings to everyone as this new year begins to unfold...

My exclusive preview of the 2017 Outsider Art Fair, which will take place in New York next week, from Thu Jan 19 through Sun Jan 22, 2017, has just been published in HYPERALLERGIC's "Weekend" edition.

You can find this well-illustrated article here:

http://hyperallergic.com/351467/from-curiosity-to-institution-the-outsider-art-fair-at-25/

This year, this art fair will mark the 25th anniversary of its founding. My article's headline: "From Curiosity to Institution: The Outsider Art Fair at 25."

I hope you'll enjoy reading this informative report.

With best wishes,

EDWARD

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Goings On is compiled weekly by Harley Spiller