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Contents for July 20, 2010
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1. Nicolas Dumit Estevez, FF Alumn, tours Europe, July 2010
2. Joseph Nechvatal, FF Alumn, in Sub Rosa, vol. 6
3. Martha Rosler, FF Alumn, in Art Papers, July-August 2010
4. Shirin Neshat, FF Alumn, in Museum magazine, July-August 2010
5. Ana Mendieta, Carolee Schneemann, FF Alumns, at NYU, Manhattan, August 1, and more
6. Deb Margolin, FF Alumn, in The New York Times, July 20, 2010
7. Esther K. Smith, FF Alumn, at Philadelphia Center for the Book, July 24
8. Diane Torr, FF Alumn, in Glasgow, Scotland, July 24, 25
9. Lillian Ball, Suzanne Lacy, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, FF Alumns, at Wave Hill, The Bronx, thru Aug. 20
10. Sabrina Jones, FF Alumn, publishes new book
11. Alexander Viscio, FF Alumn, launches new video blog
12. Stefanie Trojan, FF Alumn, now online at www.hackingthecity.com
13. Nina Kuo, FF Alumn, at Voelker Orth Museum, Flushing, Aug. 22
14. Lisa Moren, FF Alumn, now online at http://lisamoren.tumblr.com/
15. Kal Spelletich, FF Alumn, at Jack Hanley Gallery, Manhattan, opening August 5
16. Dynasty Handbag, FF Alumn, in the Village Voice, July 13
17. Sheelah Murthy, Carolee Schneemann, Kal Spelletich, Regina Vater, FF Alumns, at Domy Books, Austin, TX, Aug. 7-Sept . 9
18. Micki Watanabe Spiller, Harley Spiller, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, July 18
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1. Nicolas Dumit Estevez, FF Alumn, tours Europe, July 2010

Tres Leches/Three Milks

Nicolas Dumit Estevez on Pilgrimage from the South Bronx to Catalonia, Spain, Portugal and France. The last stop is Germany.
July 2010

I title this three-tiered journey through Europe after the name of a Latino cake the recipe for which calls for three kinds of milk: condensed, regular and evaporated (and heavy cream). But instead of engaging in baking, I travel to Montserrat in Catalonia, Lourdes in France, and Fatima in Portugal to search for the nurturing substance with which the apparitions and presence of the Virgin have imbued these sacred sites. The pilgrimage I undertake verges between tourism and spirituality as I make stops along the route to look at secular and cultural sites and, time permitting, to pay a visit to the reliquary of Saint James Apostle in Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

Black Business at La Montserrat:
In Montserrat (La Moreneta) where the black Virgin of Catalonia is found, I engage in a reflection on race and ethnicity from my own Dominican perspective. I delve into all of the aspects of blackness I grew up with on the island, to fully acknowledge the influence of my indelible African background. I end the journey by kissing the only part of the Virgin that is exposed to the public for interaction: the tarnished globe in Her hand.

Lourdes is in France and Belliard is a French Last Name:
Throughout the years I have forgotten whatever French I learned in School and in my travels. Nevertheless, I stop in Lourdes to salute the Virgin and to contemplate the possibility of being submerged in the waters of the Holy spring. During my visit to this part of France, I check the telephone book to look for any evidence of a Belliard family in the area. This was the last name of my great grandmother Inocencia, and that which connects me with Haiti. While in Lourdes, I will sign all documents as: Nicolás Belliard as a small homage to my great grandmother and our Belliard relatives.

Thanking Fatima with my Digestive System:
The reason for visiting the Virgin of Fatima in Portugal is to express my deep gratitude to Her for curing the gastritis and the irritated esophagus from which I have suffered recurrently for many years, and to thank Her for sparing me from an early death from milk intolerance during my infancy. No more Nexium; no more Prilosec, no more acid reflux.

Nein, ich spreche kein deutsch, but I Talk in Berlin
My final stop is in Berlin, where I present images of the sites visited at Within Walking Distance, a seminar on walking, pilgrimages and processions I will teach at the Transart Institute:

http://www.transartinstitute.org/Summer_program.html

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2. Joseph Nechvatal, FF Alumn, in Sub Rosa, vol. 6

Sub Rosa
Anthology Of Noise & Electronic Music #6

The sixth and penultimate edition in Sub Rosa's ongoing assembly of crucial noise and electronic music looks at the period 1957-2010. So far the series has been duly noted for its excavation and reappraisal of lesser known works by important artists and vol. 6 is no different, presenting 26 exclusive and original compositions including the work of Tzvi Avni, Joseph Nechvatal, and Kohei Gomi/Pain Jerk among better known titans of the avant garde such as Stephen O'Malley, Dick Raaymakers, John Weise and Z'ev. We enter disc one to the thrilling electroacoustic composition 'Mi Vida' by Prix Ars Electronica award winner, Israel Martinez, exploring the visceral narrative of a car ride which ends in a crash. Ata Ebtekar presents an original commission in 'Turquoise Gas in Ice', a complex piece of electroacoustic composition playing Persian classical scales on acoustic instruments which are then run through a modular synthesizer to create dazzling abstract harmonics. From La Monte Young's former archivist Joseph Nechvatal, 'Ego Masher' is another revelation, offering a vivid Cageian collage which undoubtedly reminds us of James Ferraro's recent exploits, while on 'Trautonium Jetztzeit #4' Oliver Strummer + Liesl Ujvary use the same machine that created the sound of birds in Alfred Hitchcock's classic to shape an acrid noisescape and the work of the hugely influential Henry Cowell is represented in 'The Banshee', a 2'30 summoning of dynamic electronic ghosts. The second disc starts with the drum practices of Z'ev and follows through Daniel Menche's drones and a intense noise attack from John Weise. The Pain Barrier's 'Virus' offers a blackened chunk of speedcore gabber, thematically linked with Julie Rousse's 'Flesh Barbie Techno Fuck' glitchcore, and followed with Bird Palace & Cristian Vogel's micro-to-meta expansion of sound fragments in 'PHing'. One of the oldest recordings is Else Marie Pade's 'Syv Cirkler' from 1958, distinctly reminding of Daphne Oram's ethereal experiments and finding similarities in the high frequencies tones of Stephen O'Malley's 'Dolmens & Lighthouses' but also sharp contrasts in his use of ultra low subbass registers. This historically ripe collection of sound warrants your attention without delay.

So here is the 6th and penultimate installment in our series. As usual, it culls old historical pieces, little-known gems, and even a few previously unreleased tracks from the greatest Japanoise bands, a few representatives of the younger generations (from all around the world), some rare tracks from the '80s, and it all ends with a lull that lets transpire what may be felt as a kind of undefinable mystery.

The Avant-Garde - the possibility of a new music (think about it). Then it scattered into small communities whose best-known protagonists are totally unknown to people outside that particular circle. We are facing this fragmentation, and one form of avant-garde (you could say) ends up scattered into several (not exclusively musical) forms. It is not in Avant-Garde's nature to create one elementary form for each individual. Other phrases used include "forays," "breakthroughs," "pushing the envelope," and then of course "going too far" The Sub Rosa compilations are dotted with a who's who of the electro-acoustic avant-garde from the past century, tossed in with a smorgasborg of previously unknown (and often very interesting) artists as well as contemporary musicians who are well on their way to establishing themselves within the canons of the institutional avant-garde. Sub Rosa has gone out of its way to compile a collection to scramble one's notions of the taxonomic rhetoric that may influence the perception of any of the artists present... (Aquarius)

Joseph Nechvatal

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3. Martha Rosler, FF Alumn, in Art Papers, July-August 2010

A review of an exhibition of Haegue Yang with Martha Rosler, FF Alumn, appears in the July-August issue of Artpapers on page. 56. For more information please visit artpapers.org

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4. Shirin Neshat, FF Alumn, in Museum magazine, July-August 2010

Shirin Neshat’s work is featured in the Showcase column of Museum magazine, July-August 2010

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5. Ana Mendieta, Carolee Schneemann, FF Alumns, at NYU, Manhattan, August 1, and more

The Fales Library and Special Collections & The Department of Performance Studies, Tisch School of the Arts, present "Where is Ana Mendieta?" August 1-September 8, 2010. The exhibition will take place from August 1-October 8, at Tracey/Barry Gallery, 70 Washington Square South, 3rd Floor. A symposium, with panelist Carolee Schneemann, FF Alumn, and others, will take place at 721 Broadway, room 612, on October 7 at 7 pm.

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6. Deb Margolin, FF Alumn, in The New York Times, July 20, 2010

The New York Times, July 20, 2010
The Play on Madoff, Without Wiesel
By PATRICK HEALY
HUDSON, N.Y. — Two months after Elie Wiesel used legal threats to shut down a play that imagined his relationship with his former money manager, Bernard L. Madoff, that work — revised, with a new character replacing Mr. Wiesel — will have its first performances this week. The playwright, Deborah Margolin, is also trying to move forward, yet remains deeply shaken by her clash with Mr. Wiesel, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and Holocaust survivor.

"This has been a profoundly painful experience, and I’m still scared to talk about it, because I can’t get sued, there’s no way I could afford it," Ms. Margolin said in an interview last week before a rehearsal of "Imagining Madoff." That play is scheduled to run from Wednesday through Aug. 7 at Stageworks/Hudson, a theater company in this town, about 30 miles south of Albany.

"But I also didn’t want to abandon this play," said Ms. Margolin, an Obie Award-winning writer who teaches in the theater studies program at Yale University. Her ties to Stageworks, a 100-seat theater in a former flypaper factory, helped the suddenly controversial play to see the light of day.

Ms. Margolin is best known for her one-woman shows, including "Three Seconds in the Key," about receiving a diagnosis of Hodgkin’s disease. She was drawn to understand Mr. Madoff by imagining an encounter between him and Mr. Wiesel, one of his most famous victims. Mr. Wiesel and his wife lost their life savings in Mr. Madoff’s billion-dollar Ponzi scheme, and their charitable foundation lost $15.2 million. Mr. Wiesel, who declined to comment for this article, has publicly referred to Mr. Madoff as a "scoundrel" and "thief."

The original play, with the Wiesel character, was supposed to be performed at a theater in Washington, until that production was scuttled in May under pressure from Mr. Wiesel. Stageworks/Hudson is now producing the revised work, in which "Wiesel" has been replaced by a new character, a Holocaust survivor and poet named Solomon Galkin.

But Victor A. Kovner, a partner at Davis Wright Tremaine who is representing Ms. Margolin pro bono, said he did not believe the writer faced the threat of a lawsuit.
"The play she has decided to complete and that will be opening shortly is not about Mr. Wiesel at all," Mr. Kovner said.
The Wiesel character in the earlier script was no passing contrivance. Ms. Margolin said she had seen the character as an ideal dramatic device, a name that would instantly connote moral authority. The central scene of the original play was an imagined conversation in which Wiesel pleaded with Madoff to invest his money. It also included a sexually tinged memory of Wiesel’s time in a concentration camp, as well as readings from the Talmud and meditations on repentance.

Wiesel spent much of the play cajoling and counseling Madoff, building up to a climactic moment in which the treacherous investor considered confessing his deceit to his wise and kindly companion.

The replacement character, Galkin, is described in the script as "80 years old, Holocaust survivor, poet, translator, treasurer of his synagogue." But much of the original Wiesel dialogue has been retained and given to him, including the concentration camp memory and several provocative passages about morality and forgiveness.

Ms. Margolin said she had initially hoped that Mr. Wiesel would find the play compelling and thoughtful. But after she sent him a copy, Mr. Wiesel replied with a letter in April, saying he found the play to be "obscene" and "defamatory," and in which he threatened to enlist his lawyers to stop its production. According to Ms. Margolin and her lawyer, Mr. Wiesel and his foundation’s representatives never specified what they considered obscene or defamatory.

At the time, Theater J in Washington, a company that specializes in Jewish-theme works and is part of the Jewish Community Center there, had committed to mounting "Imagining Madoff" in its fall 2010 season. Ms. Margolin and Ari Roth, the theater’s artistic director, discussed replacing the Wiesel figure; she went to work on rewriting while he continued talking to the Wiesel Foundation.

At the same time, Mr. Roth said he worried that a quick fix would be difficult. "I imagined it would be a challenge to endow the vividness and authority of Wiesel to an unknown like Solomon Galkin," Mr. Roth said.

As a good-faith gesture, Mr. Roth said he told the foundation that he would share a copy of the rewritten script, to demonstrate that Wiesel was gone. But Ms. Margolin thought the gesture was tantamount to giving approval rights to Mr. Wiesel. (Mr. Roth said, "There was no intention or invitation for Mr. Wiesel to offer approval.")

Ms. Margolin decided in May to pull the play from Theater J and offered it to Laura Margolis, the artistic director of Stageworks/Hudson. The two had worked together on a short-play festival in 2009 at Stageworks, and Ms. Margolis had read the original draft of "Imagining Madoff." She accepted and added the play, which she is directing, to the Stageworks schedule.

Neither woman believes, ultimately, that anything has been lost with the replacement of the Wiesel character.
"Galkin also gave Deb more freedom and flexibility to expand on this man as a poet, as a leader of a synagogue, rather than being a famous-figure character that we might not be able to get close to," Ms. Margolis said. Asked to assess how the artists at Theater J handled Mr. Wiesel’s concerns, Ms. Margolis took a long pause and studied the face of her playwright, Ms. Margolin, who still looked exhausted from the battle.

"All I want to say is that it’s important we not lose sight of what theater does, that we not mess up for the wrong reasons, and that the play not get lost in controversy," the director said.

Mr. Roth of Theater J said he considered the play to be "indefinitely postponed," and planned to see the Stageworks production and to consider "Imagining Madoff" for a future slot on his schedule.

The playwright, meanwhile, sidestepped most questions to which she might have said something critical — about Theater J, about First Amendment protections for playwrights and especially about Mr. Wiesel, whose name did not cross her lips during two hours of conversation.

"I didn’t set out to be on the wrong side of anybody, let alone someone I admire," Ms. Margolin said. "What I’m hoping is that when I see this play finally onstage, my story being told, I’ll start feeling a bit better."

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7. Esther K. Smith, FF Alumn, at Philadelphia Center for the Book, July 24

Esther K Smith of Purgatory Pie Press (www.PurgatoryPiePress.com), and author of HOW TO MAKE BOOKS, will be a visiting artist at Philadelphia Center for the Book
Purgatory Pie Press works are in their exhibit and for sale at their store
626 South Street | Philadelphia, PA | 19146
& teaching an artist book workshop:Saturday, July 24, 10-4 pm
register: store@philadelphiacenterforthebook.org

Cake Box Books & Soft Leather Longstitch-

Pop Art meets book arts in this introduction to ancient longstitch binding—an easy multi-signature structure that opens flat and pre-dates printing—with sections stitchedr directly to the covers. Students will make a journal and a sketchbook from to start to finish--and some may have time to experiment with the form.

Warning: grocery shopping will never be the same. And you may never throw away another box.
$150 plus materials fee + Basic Materials $25—

You can bring your own bone folder, sharp scissors, the paper you most love to draw on—and/or old leather pants or the cover of an old hardback book to upcycle—and collage materials, rubber stamps, or color pencils if you'd like to make these into artist books.

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8. Diane Torr, FF Alumn, in Glasgow, Scotland, July 24, 25

I have been commissioned to create an event as part of the the Merchant City Festival (www.merchantcityfestival.com) in Glasgow. The festival takes place July 22-25 and my event will be on July 24, 25 and is free. Drift Merchant is based on the Situationist idea of a "derive" - a "detournement" - as a way to re-invent and change the way that the city is used.

This is an opportunity to re-arrange and reclaim the streets through a newly invented map, created and provided by moi. Street names are changed to reflect their ambience. Direction of drift is chosen by random events. Particular sites require specific behavioural actions. New vistas will be revealed; surprises will revel us, and we will exist as an exotic drifting entity for one hour only. Nudity is not required.

Sat 24 and Sun 25 - 2pm and 4pm
To book in advance email: mcfestivaltours@uzevents.com

I will also be performing my "two banana dance" as part of the end of the festival celebration with artists performers and crew. Curry and performances from Roger (The Devils Chauffeur) Ely, Ian ( Mischief La Bas) Smith and a galaxy of surprise appearances in the glorious surroundings of Sloans Ballroom. Ticket price includes 2 course meal.

Sunday 25 July 2010 – PERFORMANCE BANQUET at Sloan’s – 7.30pm 62 Argyle Arcade, Glasgow £15

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9. Lillian Ball, Suzanne Lacy, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, FF Alumns, at Wave Hill, The Bronx, thru Aug. 20

Lillian Ball, Suzanne Lacy, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, FF Alumns, and others are in the "Remediate/Re-vision" program at Wave Hill,The Bronx thru August 20. For full information please visit www.wavehill.org

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10. Sabrina Jones, FF Alumn, publishes new book

"… a new deal for the American people…"

78 years ago a presidential candidate made a pledge that kindled hope in the depths of depression.
Today, Franklin Roosevelt's call for change is invoked and debated as we once again face hard times of historic proportion.

FDR and the New Deal for Beginners
Comics by Sabrina Jones
Text by Paul Buhle
Afterword by Harvey Pekar (R.I.P!)

A concise history animated by new comic strips and vintage illustrations.

See the video trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMwmQ0ljJaU

Order the book: http://www.amazon.com/FDR-Deal-Beginners-Paul-Buhle/dp/1934389501/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1279556372&sr=1-1
Ebook available. Visit the Facebook page.
Distributed by Random House.

http://www.sabrinaland.com

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11. Alexander Viscio, FF Alumn, launches new video blog

http://theartview.blogspot.com/%20
theartview.blogspot.com
Scroll down to "Walk down Scheilmülgasse" June 29th, 2010 to view the video blog of:
Hang Gliding with a LazyBoy.
Have a hot summer and don't blame me.
A

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12. Stefanie Trojan, FF Alumn, now online at www.hackingthecity.com

www.hackingthecity.com
From 16th of July 2010

Hacking the City

"Hacking the City" is an innovative project reacting to changing structures in the public, mobility and communication in the city. How will public life, democratic culture and modern resistance be articulated in art? Which forms will be used, which can be revived, which models can artists and activists follow?

How can a city's resources be reacquired for active citizens and for individual use? Artistic, communicative and creative means are used to develop a critique of a consumer culture which defines the city, of the rule of advertising, democratic indifference and an increasing privatization of public space.

Among the types of actions are strategies of "Adbusting" as well as "Faking"
(or plagerism), adding in and taking away (misappropriation), irritation and disruption, forms of Hacktivism, Flash Mob actions, re-enactments, performances, sculpture in public space, concealed investigations, hidden actions, events directed via internet or mobile phones. These apply no longer only to urban (exterior) space as places of actions and work, but also to the World Wide Web (home pages, video platforms, power sellers, servers etc..). Participants are artists, nerds, web-designers, communications guerrillas, street artists, performers and musicians.

"Urban Hacking" became increasingly widespread as an artistic practice in the 90s. Starting point for this artistic strategy were political, social as well as purely creative themes. In America, "Hacktivism" was initially more visible than in Europe. Groups like the "Adbusters" organized large campaigns against American companies and media conglomerates, provoked their fellow citizens' consumer habits, or presented theater pieces in front of security cameras. In Europe too, a 'cultural practise' of subversive strategies has developed throughout different artistic genres and age groups. They follow the logic of hackers: entering into other systems, finding their way around and then introducing applications that change or expand that system's limits and utility.

"Hacking the City" means a non-recognition and a making apparent limits and seeks to make them perceptible and tangible. "Hacking the City" wants to surprise, irritate, bother, amaze and have fun.

Curator: Sabine Maria Schmidt

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13. Nina Kuo, FF Alumn, at Voelker Orth Museum, Flushing, Aug. 22

Nina Kuo "Asiatique" Exhibit - Voelker Orth Museum, Flushing Queens
Aug. 22 2010 Sunday 2-4 pm....see www.vomuseum.org

Exhibit copntinues to Sept. 1

Music Excerpts : Chinese OPERA with Alan Chow, Piba, Ehu music and
Experimanetal Music: L. Roser, Steve Klein

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14. Lisa Moren, FF Alumn, now online at http://lisamoren.tumblr.com/

Marbleized Postcards from the Gulf

In case you haven't seen this work in progress, I've made a blog from when I collected oil from the gulf and the marbleized paper I've been making from it... including photos and narrative "Gluppity GLupp" on my experience.

http://lisamoren.tumblr.com/

Thanks for looking at this work in progress, more video and works on paper to come!
lisa

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15. Kal Spelletich, FF Alumn, at Jack Hanley Gallery, Manhattan, opening August 5

Kal Spelletich’s
COSMICISM AND CONTEMPORARY FORESTRY
From Northern California
at THE JACK HANLEY GALLERY
Opening: Thursday, August 5, 2010 6-9PM
136 watts street.new york, ny 10013. 646 918 6824. jackhanley.com

A technologically mutated organic hybrid to, of and for trees. machines. robots. photographs.
A. A bio-engineered permutation. (a.) a deliberate attempt to cross two parents with desirable characteristics and incorporate
said characters in next generations.
(b.) a synthesis of nature and technology
(c.) to produce an anomaly.
B. Deviant transmogrification.
(a.) post nature. (b.) new species struggling for life. (c.) an unholy marriage.
C. The Paradox of Technology. (a.) It could save us. Can it save us? (b.) It is killing us.
Our culture has an excruciatingly dangerous claim to have such complete understanding and command over nature that we can radically manipulate and re-engineer it with minimal risk to the natural systems that sustain us. How little control even the most ingenious among us have over the awesome, intricately interconnected natural forces with which we so casually meddle.

I want to save the world, or at least slow down its demise. I want to get back to what really matters. So, I thought, why not start in my own back yard?

It all reads like a Greek tragedy about human hubris; a political class eager to believe that nature has indeed been mastered. Sir Francis Bacon best encapsulated the ethos when he wrote in the 1623 De dignitate et augmentis scientiarum that nature is to be "put in constraint, molded, and made as it were new by art and the hand of man." However, in his solo exhibit, Comicism and Contemporary Forestry from Northern California, Kal Spelletich’s hand defies Bacon’s ethos to suggest that in the struggle between large scale forces and the grand scheme of intergalactic existence, humans are no more significant than the insects crawling on trees.

We are being mastered by the forces of nature and "our" world is coming to an end. Trees don’t need our help, we need theirs. They replenish the environment with oxygen and filter pollution--nourishing us by their mere existence; they have the ultimate (more than anything humans may construct) capacity to heal. Trees will be the savior but only if we let them. As Spelletich’s work righteously exhibits, passively tying ourselves to the trunk of a 2,000 year old Sequoia is no longer the answer. Now, it’s all about mobilization. Dystopian and reverential, this exhibition is both an homage and a warning.

Spelletich’s Comicism and Contemporary Forestry from Northern California includes an actual 20 foot Monterey Pine tree robot covered with traditional healing herbs, photographs of 360' tall, 2000 year old Redwoods and Sequoias, Monterey Pines Pinus radiata (family Pinaceae) and Royal Palm trees (roystonea) and a machine/tree BB-Q designed to feed the masses.

Kal Spelletich received his MFA from the University of Texas at Austin and currently lives and works in San Francisco, CA. Spelletich helped found SEEMEN, a collective of individuals who enjoy building extreme machines and robots that they allow their audience to operate. He is a notorious guerilla gardener and activist. He has also worked with the legendary machine performance art group, Survival Research Laboratories.

Opening and closing nights will include homemade BB-Q compliments of the machine/tree BB-Q and the DJ stylings of only S.F., CA music by multiple California x-pats located in New York City.

Closing event: Saturday, 6-9 PM, August 28, 2010

For more information or images please contact Katie Schetlick at 646.918.6824, Katie@jackhanley.com or you can visit our website at www.jackhanley.com
136 watts street.new york, ny 10013. 646 918 6824. jackhanley.com
http://kaltek.wordpress.com/

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16. Dynasty Handbag, FF Alumn, in the Village Voice, July 13

Dynasty Handbag was interviewed by Michael Musto in the July 13 Village Voice – here’s a link:

http://www.villagevoice.com/2010-07-13/columns/the-most-outrageous-performance-artist-in-town/

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17. Sheelah Murthy, Carolee Schneemann, Kal Spelletich, Regina Vater, FF Alumns, at Domy Books, Austin, TX, Aug. 7-Sept . 9

Domy Books, in association with Okay Mountain, is pleased to present

88
organized by Andy Coolquitt

Quote from the curator: "When the guys at Domy Books and Okay Mountain asked me to put a show together I started thinking about the relationships between my formative years and the importance of these two spaces in particular, and the rise of artist-run, DIY public exhibition spaces in general. In 1988 it was not so common for a young artist in Austin to organize a public exhibition. It was not so common for an artist to think about their relationship to, and their purpose within a larger society."

featuring
Jamie Panzer, Jill Thrasher, Kal Spelletich, Nic Maffei, Regina Vater, Sheelah Murthy, Steve Jones, Teresa Hubbard, Theresa Houston, Lance Letscher, Bob Anderson, Bogdan Perzynski, Carolee Schneemann, Elisa Jimenez, Luke Savisky, Peter Glassford, Sawad Brooks, Julia Maffei, Bill Lundberg, Ethyl Shipton, Angela Berkson, Ted Laredo, Penny Van Horn, Teresa Hubbard/Alexander Birchler, Scott Van Horn, Bart Farrar and more..

Domy Books
www.domybooks.com
913 E Cesar Chavez
Austin, TX 78702
(512) 476-3669

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18. Micki Watanabe Spiller, Harley Spiller, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, July 18

The Sunday New York Times "Week in Review" of July 18, 2010 published an "Op-Art" editorial with photographs by Micki Watanabe Spiller with text by Harley Spiller. It is also available in slide-show format at

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/07/16/opinion/20100718_Weights.html

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Goings On is compiled weekly by Harley Spiller

Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc.
80 Arts - The James E. Davis Arts Building
80 Hanson Place #301
Brooklyn NY 11217-1506 U.S.A.
Tel: 718-398-7255
Fax: 718-398-7256
http://www.franklinfurnace.org
mail@franklinfurnace.org

Martha Wilson, Founding Director
Mary Haberle, Digital Specialist
Michael Katchen, Senior Archivist
Jenny Korns, Webmaster
Harley Spiller, Administrator
Eben Shapiro, Program Coordinator
Judith L. Woodward, Financial Manager