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Contents for June 11, 2008:
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1. Franklin Furnace Sequential Art for Kids photography workshop opening and website launch party, 80 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, June 20, 5-7 pm
2. John Baldessari, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jenny Holzer, Joseph Kosuth, Ana Mendieta, Ed Ruscha, FF Alumns, at Sean Kelly Gallery, Manhattan, opening June 21
3. Judith Sloan, FF Alumn, now online at www.thirdcoastfestival.org/audio_library.asp
4. Barbara Rosenthal, FF Alumn, in Berlin, Germany, June 10-15
5. Jay Critchley, FF Alumn, in Providence, RI, opening June 13
6. Richard Prince, Robin Tewes, Anton Van Dalen, FF Alumns, at Adam Baumgold Gallery, Manhattan
7. John Baldessari, Dan Graham, Julia Scher, Michael Smith, William Wegman, FF Alumns, at Marian Goodman Gallery, Manhattan, opening June 25
8. Dan Perjovschi, Tadej Pogačar, FF Alumns, in Ljubljana, Slovenia, opening June 12
9. Joseph Nechvatal, Robert Rauschenberg, FF Alumns, now online at http://post.thing.net/blog/244
10. Terry Braunstein, FF Alumn, in Almeria, Spain, thru July 13
11. Donna Henes, FF Alumn, in Battery Park, Manhattan, June 20, and more
12. RENO, Holly Hughes, Deb Margolin, Salley May, Lucy Sexton, FF Alumns, at Theaterlab, Manhattan, June 17-21
13. Michael Smith, FF Alumn, at Electronic Arts Intermix, Manhattan, June 17-18
14. Mona Hatoum, FF Alumn, at Parasol Unit, London, UK, preview June 12
15. Ruth Hardinger, FF Alumn, in Washington Square Park, Manhattan, June 17
16. Tobaron Waxman, FF Alumn, in Tel Aviv, Israel, June 12-14
17. Frank Moore, FF Alumn, call for Electors for Presidential Campaign
18. Jenny Holzer, FF Alumn, at EVO Gallery, Santa Fe, NM, opening June 19
19. Fiona Templeton, FF Alumn, on Governor’s Island, NY, June 27-29
20. Michael Smith, FF Alumn, at Electronic Arts Intermix, Manhattan, June 17-18
21. Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc. in the New York Times, June 12
22. Tim Miller, FF Alumn, now online at advocate.com
23. Susana Cook, Murray Hill, FF Alumns, at Leslie/Lohman Gay Art Foundation, Manhattan, June 19, 7-9 pm
24. Lynn Swanson, FF Alumn, in Turin, Italy
25. Jody Pinto, FF Alumn, in Philadelphia, PA, June 21-22, and more
26. Kimsooja, FF Alumn, in Lofoten, Norway, thru September 7
27. Raúl Zamudio, FF Alumn, in Yeosu, South Korea, Aug. 30-Sept. 20
28. Liliana Porter, FF Alumn, at Leo Fortuna Gallery, Hudson, NY, opening June 21
29. Rashaad Newsome, FF Alumn, at Location One, Manhattan, opening June 19, and more
30. Brody Condon, FF Alumn, in Arnhem, Holland, thru Sept. 21
31. Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, FF Alumn, in The New York Times, June 15


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1. Franklin Furnace Sequential Art for Kids photography workshop opening and website launch party, 80 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, June 20, 5-7 pm
You are cordially invited to Franklin Furnace’s Sequential Art for Kids photography workshop opening and website launch party on Friday, June 20 from 5 to 7 PM, at 80 Arts, 80 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, New York 11217. Doug Beube, assisted by Jules Veros, was the teaching artist for the photography workshop in Ms. Dixon’s 5th grade class; Louise Diedrich, assisted by Katya Grokhovsky, was the teaching artist for the website design workshop in Ms. Parker-Marshall’s 5th grade class at P.S. 20, the Clinton Hill School.
You are also cordially invited to a public screening of videotapes by students in Ms. Haynes’ 4th grade class, and Ms. McIntosh’s 5th grade class, Monday, June 23, 6:30 PM, at P.S. 20, 225 Adelphi Street in Fort Greene. Ron Littke was the teaching artist in both Sequential Art for Kids video workshops. Sequential Art for Kids has for over 20 years has provided onsite art activities that integrate into school curriculum.
Franklin Furnace wishes to gratefully acknowledge the supporters of Sequential Art for Kids: The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, The Bay and Paul Foundations, The Cowles Charitable Trust, the Independence Community Foundation, JPMorgan Chase Foundation, The New York Times Company Foundation, and the New York State Council on the Arts’ Arts-In-Education Program.

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2. John Baldessari, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jenny Holzer, Joseph Kosuth, Ana Mendieta, Ed Ruscha, FF Alumns, at Sean Kelly Gallery, Manhattan, opening June 21

Cancelled, Erased & Removed, June 21-August 1, 2008, Sean Kelly Gallery, Manhattan.
The gallery is delighted to announce its group exhibition, Cancelled, Erased & Removed, which opens on June 21st. The exhibition brings together works in diverse media that examine the conceptual and formal practice of contemporary artists canceling, erasing and removing elements from their work. The exhibition continues through August 1st. The opening will take place on June 20th, from 6pm until 8pm.

The conceptual point of departure for the exhibition is Robert Rauschenberg's Erased de Kooning, 1953, where the artist erased a drawing by Willem de Kooning, simultaneously unmaking one work and creating another in an act of both destruction and devotion. Cancelled, Erased & Removed is not a survey, nor does it attempt to include all the artists who have explored this subject matter; rather it is a presentation of a specifically selected group of artists who have taken a particularly interesting, innovative or non-traditional approach to these themes. The works span a wide range of media including painting, drawing, photography, video and performance art.

Among the works in the exhibition is Joseph Kosuth's seminal piece, Zero & Not, which consists of cancelled sentences silk-screened on paper. A continuous line over the words negates the original text by Sigmund Freud. In Mike Bidlo's ...Erased de Kooning Drawing, the artist leaves a ghostly suggestion of the original drawing. Bidlo's version not only pays homage to Rauschenberg's gesture, but also makes a provocative conceptual statement about the art of appropriation. Callum Innes applies paint to the canvas, while turpentine is utilized to remove a section of the paint before it dries. He describes it as "unpainting" the canvas, leaving all but the faintest vestigial traces of color. 
 Felix Gonzalez-Torres's stacks of printed paper sheets, which are free for the public to remove, become a perpetually shrinking and replenished sculpture. In Julião Sarmento's video Parasite, the subject removes her garments slowly while the scene is played in reverse. When the protagonist redresses it is played in reverse again, challenging the perception of a traditional striptease. In Marine Hugonnier's Restoration Project, historical paintings are acquired by the artist and then subjected to a process of restoration/cleaning by a qualified professional. The 'restored' painting is exhibited alongside two typed condition reports, one made before and one made after the cleaning. Through this process, Hugonnier is able to slightly alter both the work itself and its history. Jenny Holzer's Palm Left 000037 relies on altered Iraqi war documents to explore the idea of eradication of information and offer glimpses of hidden pasts and altered present realities.

The artists included in the exhibition are: Janine Antoni, Josh Azzarella, John Baldessari, Mike Bidlo, Slater Bradley, David Ellis, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Douglas Gordon, Jenny Holzer, Marine Hugonnier, Callum Innes, Alfredo Jaar, Titus Kaphar, Idris Khan, Yves Klein, Joseph Kosuth, Peter Liversidge, Richard Long, Jorge Macchi, Anthony McCall, Ana Mendieta, Ed Ruscha, Julião Sarmento, Yuken Teruya and Gavin Turk.

Located at 528 West 29th Street, New York, the Sean Kelly gallery will be open Monday through Friday 10am - 5pm beginning July 7th. From August 1st until September 1st, we will be open by appointment only. On Tuesday September 2nd, we will resume our regular hours, Tuesday through Friday 11am - 6pm and Saturday 10am - 6pm.

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3. Judith Sloan, FF Alumn, now online at www.thirdcoastfestival.org/audio_library.asp

New from EarSay!
Judith Sloan, is developing new work for live performance and radio!

Two of the pieces are featured on the Third Coast International Audio Festival website on the homepage through June 18th! Listen now!

Here's the latest from the Third Coast Festival http://www.thirdcoastfestival.org/
Sweeping Statements
Written and produced by Judith Sloan

Being a teenager can be really hard. Especially if you’ve flunked out of school. Or your dad has disappeared. Or you’re incarcerated at a juvenile detention center and don’t see much hope for the future. And teaching those teenagers can be pretty hard too, as Judith Sloan can attest. She works with at-risk youth, teaching theater, writing, and juggling in alternative schools and jails. Most of her students are angry and at first reluctant to express themselves. But often, with some coaxing, they eventually do. And then Judith finds ways to shape their words and expressions into stories that are part drama, part documentary and part music. One story in particular, Sweeping Statements http://www.thirdcoastfestival.org/ explores this process while also revealing the complicated lives of her students.

To go directly to the interview:
http://www.thirdcoastfestival.org/behind_scenes_sweepingstatements.asp
To go directly to listen:
http://www.thirdcoastfestival.org/audio_library.asp

ALSO:
Crossing the BLVD audio pieces available individually through the websites:
http://www.earsay.org
http://www.crossingtheblvd.org
http://www.myspace.com/crossingtheblvd

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4. Barbara Rosenthal, FF Alumn, in Berlin, Germany, June 10-15

Berlin Contemporary: Barbara Rosenthal Conceptual Performance Art June 10-15

New Life Berlin Contemporary Arts Festival, sponsored by Wooloo.org, Berlin, invites you to "Existential Interact: Conceptual Street Improvisations With Passersby", by New York avant-garde artist, Barbara Rosenthal.

With puppets, videos, button pins, books, fake money, cards, and free give-aways, identity, assumptions and values will be explored. �

Come to the sidewalk in front and across the street from KW Kunst-Werke Institute of Contemporary Art, Augustrasse 69, Berlin-Mitte, anytime June 10 - 15, 1-6pm.

Postcard invitation JPG and Press Release PDF are attached (6/9/08-3).
Link to preview by British art critic Clare Carswell:
http://sites.a-n.co.uk/interface/reviews/single/437477
For more information call Berlin cell phone: 01520-289-4055

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5. Jay Critchley, FF Alumn, in Providence, RI, opening June 13

ARTIST JAY CRITCHLEY ANNOUNCES CRYPTIC PROVIDENCE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS @ NORTH BURIAL GROUND IN PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND.

FIFTEEN VISUAL ARTISTS AND PERFORMERS SELECTED.

OPENS FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 2008.

Providence, Rhode Island. The historic North Burial Ground in Providence, Rhode Island will host a summer long art and performance project by Provincetown artist Jay Critchley, entitled Cryptic Providence. Fifteen projects from visual artists and performers from Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Michigan, Oregon, Ontario, Canada and New York City were invited by Critchley to create original, site-specific installations and performances throughout the cemetery.

Cryptic Providence opens Friday the 13th of with performances on the first two weekends. The cemetery is located at 5 Branch Avenue (at North Main Street) and is open to the public seven days a week from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm daily. All events are free and open to the public. For more information contact ArtTix at http://arttixri.com/search_results.cfm
401 621-6123.

Visual artists creating summer long, site-specific installations include: Critchley’s Final Passage−a vintage Chevy “mummified” and installed in the abandoned mausoleum; from Brooklyn, Joseph Burwell’s archeological mausoleum installation, The Purity of the Vikings; Justin Pollmann’s disintegrating text installation, We Live, Brooklyn; artists and designers from Michigan and Ontario, Canada: Rochelle Martin, Valentine Mancini & Jay McGuire who construct a place of repose, Message Board; filmmakers Sandrine Silverman & Alfred Schoeninger, Quincy, MA, Our Stones Last Beyond Our Years.

Rhode Island artists include: installation artist Rebecca Siemering, Pawtucket, The Bells Ring for Thee, activates Potter’s Field with handmade bells; Erik Carlson & Erik Gould, new media artists from Pawtucket and Providence with the web-based, geo-tagged, Strange Loop: An Ethereal Walking Tour of the North Burial Ground; visual artist Jae Willard, Barrington, constructs an eight-foot, mixed media Tree of Life; installation artist Jen Raimondi, East Greenwich, creates a flock turkey vultures with Big Hair; and from Providence; historian and project consultant Robert O. Jones creates an historic guide; Nancy Austin, Newport, & Caroline Woolard, NYC, Footnotes −a tribute to Albert J. Jones (1821-1887), The forgotten founder of RI's first “Art Museum”.

Cryptic Providence performances are scheduled for Friday, June 13, the opening, from 5:00 to 10:00 pm; Saturday, June 14 from 11:00 am to 10:00 pm; June 21 from 3:00 pm to 10:00 pm; and the closing weekend, Saturday, Setember 27. Performances include: dancer/choreographer Wanda Gala, Brooklyn, & sound artist Bob Bellerue, Oregon, collaborate on a durational movement/sound piece in the mausoleum, The Blue Storm; Hannah Verlin, Boston, Nest Eggs, an installation of burning ceramic eggs; JUMP! Dance with Mary Paula Hunter, A Grave Dance; musicians Arvid Tomayko-Peters & Christie Lee Gibson from Brown perform a voice and electroacoustic Requiem Mass; Constance Crawford directing the Coalition of Perishable Goods from Perishable Theatre, presenting a multi-site narrative, Otherworldly Voices.

SCHEDULE
CRYPTIC PROVIDENCE – More than a graveyard
North Burial Ground
Providence, Rhode Island

June 13 to September 28, 2008 − Artists’ installations:
Message Board: Rochelle Martin, Jay McGuire & Valentino Mancini; Our Stones Last Beyond Our Years: Sandrine Silverman & Alfred Schoeninger; We Live: Justin Pollmann; Final Passage: Jay Critchley; Big Hair: Jen Raimondi; The Purity of the Vikings: Joseph Burwell; Tree of Life: Jae Wyllie Willard; The Bells Ring for Thee: Rebecca Siemering.

Performance schedule and events:
Friday the 13th of June, 2008
5:00-7:00 pm Silverman/Schoeninger video, Our Stones Last Beyond Our Years,
mausoleum
7:00 pm Wanda Gala & Bob Bellerue, dance/sound, The Blue Storm Wanda, mausoleum
8:15 pm Arvid Tomayko-Peters & Christie Lee Gibson, voice and electroacoustic music,
Requiem Mass
9:00 pm Hannah Verlin, fire-activated installation, Nest Eggs

Saturday the 14th of June
11:00 am to 8:00 pm
11:00 am Erik Carlson & Erik Gould, geo-tagged, GPS tour (bring your iPods &
hand helds), Strange Loop: An Ethereal Walking Tour of the
North Burial Ground
1:00 pm Connie Crawford directs the Coalition of Perishable Goods from Perishable
Theatre performing Otherworldly Voices, mausoleum & beyond
2:30-3:30, Artists Talk
4:00 pm, Mary Paula Hunter & JUMP! Dancers, A Grave Dance
5:30-6:30 pm Wanda Gala & Bob Bellerue, dance/sound, The Blue Storm, mausoleum

Saturday the 21st of June
1: 30-3:30 pm Silverman/Schoeninger video, Our Stones Last Beyond Our Years,
mausoleum
3:30 pm, Mary Paula Hunter & JUMP! Dancers, A Grave Dance
5:00 pm Robert O. Jones, Guide to North Burial Ground, historical guided tour
6:30 pm Connie Crawford directs the Coalition of Perishable Goods from Perishable
Theatre performing Otherworldly Voices, mausoleum & beyond
8:15 Arvid Tomayko-Peters & Christie Lee Gibson, voice and electroacoustic music,
Requiem Mass
9:00 pm Hannah Verlin, fire-activated installation, Nest Eggs

Saturday the 27th of September
Noon to 6:00 pm Nancy Austin & Caroline Woolard, Footnotes −a tribute to
Albert J. Jones (1821-1887), the forgotten founder of RI's first “Art Museum”.
For more information go to: www.arttixri.com

Sunday the 28th of September CRYPTIC PROVIDENCE CLOSES

Cryptic Providence is funded by a New Works grant from the Rhode Island Foundation and sponsored by the City of Providence Parks Department and the Department of Art, Culture & Tourism, with support from AS220. The Rhode Island Foundation’s New Works program was established to support artists in the creation of original art and exploration of new artistic directions. The program awarded grants from 2000 to 2005 to artists partnering with nonprofit arts and community-based organizations to expand the state’s cultural richness, develop new audiences and strengthen community connections to the arts.

Selected artists will examine and interpret the history of North Burial Ground, established in 1700, and burial practices in relation to the rich history of Rhode Island. The project also hopes to create new ideas, perspectives and images about our relationship to death, dying and burial customs, and bring increased visitation and use of the cemetery by highlighting the historical and cultural resources of North Burial Ground.

Critchley is a multi-media artist who lives in Provincetown, MA and is represented by artSTRAND. From performances, rituals and Boston State House legislation to his Big Dig BigTwig project and award-winning Martucket Eyeland Resort & Theme Park, his eco-activist art goes back to the early 1980s with his Provincetown “sand car” series. Last summer he created the public art project, Beige Motel, on Route 6, North Truro, MA encrusting a 1955 A-frame structure − soon to be demolished − with sand.

His work has been shown throughout the world − last year he performed at the Hemispheric Institute in Buenos Aires, Argentina and exhibited at the Andy Warhol Museum and The LAB in San Francisco. His project GLOBAL YAWNING for a small planet was recently launched and exhibited at the Boston Center for the Arts. He was an artist in residence at AS220 in 2000, producing his first movie: Providence Dirt Newsreel. Other recent residencies include Harvard University and Harvestworks in New York City. He directs the annual benefit, the Provincetown Swim for Life & Paddler Flotilla, set this year for
September 6.

For Cryptic Providence information contact: www.arttixri.com, 401 621-6123. High resolution photos

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6. Richard Prince, Robin Tewes, Anton Van Dalen, FF Alumns, at Adam Baumgold Gallery, Manhattan

Saul Steinberg .. H. C. Westerman .. George.Grosz .. Arnold.Friedman .. Robin.Tewes .. Elvis.Studio.(Xavier Robel.+.Helge Reumann) .. Ruth.Marten .. Marc.Bell .. Genevieve.Castroe .. Rebecca.Bird .. Andres.Borocz Adam.Dant .. Vivienne.Koorland .. Seth.Michael.Forman .. Colin.Brant.. Nick.Blosser .. John.Dogg (Richard.Prince.+.Colin.De.Land) .. Mark.Kostabi .. Keith.Jones .. Scott.Teplin .. Diane.Christiansen .. Heather.Goodchild .. Sally.Webster .. Anton.Van.Dalen .. Allan. D’arcangelo .. Bette.Blank .. Mark.Wiener .. Joseph.Yoakum .And.Others

Adam Baumgold Gallery presents the exhibition Road Works from June 12 through August 15, 2008. This group exhibition features 29 artists meditations on the open road, crowded thoroughfares and nature’s paths. Through paintings, drawings and sculptures they explore the road as a symbol of progress, connection, expansion or escape.

The artists in the exhibition are Saul Steinberg, H. C. Westermann, George Grosz, Arnold Friedman, Robin Tewes, Elvis Studio (Xavier Robel and Helge Reumann), Ruth Marten, Marc Bell, Genevieve Castroe, Rebecca Bird, Andres Borocz, Vivienne Koorland, Seth Michael Forman, Colin Brant, Nick Blosser, John Dogg (Richard Prince and Colin De Land), Mark Kostabi, Keith Jones, Scott Teplin, Diane Christiansen, Heather Goodchild, Sally Webster, Anton van Dalen, Allan D’Arcangelo, Bette Blank, Mark Weiner, Joseph Yoakum and others.

Summer hours are Tuesday through Saturday 11:00 - 5:30 P.M. during June.

Adam Baumgold Gallery is at 74 EAST 79th STREET NEW YORK, NY 10075 PHONE: 212-861-7338 FAX: 212-288-1261

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7. John Baldessari, Dan Graham, Julia Scher, Michael Smith, William Wegman, FF Alumns, at Marian Goodman Gallery, Manhattan, opening June 25

at Marian Goodman Gallery New York, opening June 25th "Deep Comedy"

Deep Comedy Curated by Dan Graham With Sylvia Chivaratanond
June 25- July 30, 2008
Opening reception: Wednesday, June 25, 6-8 pm
Marian Goodman Gallery is pleased to announce our summer exhibition, Deep Comedy, curated by Dan Graham with Sylvia Chivaratanond, which will be on view from Wednesday, June 25th through July 30th.
Deep Comedy brings together artists whose work transforms elements of the commonplace into playgrounds of amusement through a wide range of media including sculpture, video, installation, photography, and elements of performance. Through work by John Baldessari (United States), Vija Celmins (United States, b. Latvia) Fischli &Weiss (Switzerland), Isa Genzken (Germany), Jef Geys (Belgium), Rodney Graham (Canada), Christian Jankowski (Germany), Allen Ruppersberg (United States), Julia Scher (United States), Roman Signer (Switzerland), Michael Smith & Joshua White (United States), William Wegman (United States), and John Wesley (United States), traditional modes of viewing are questioned via unexpected forms of delivery and display. As a reflection of our society, the artists in Deep Comedy bear witness and are borne out of the saturated media-based culture in which we reside. For these artists, whose conceptual practice is underpinned by humor and whose work embraces the oxymoronic nature of comedy, critiques of current socio-political and artistic institutions, though serious, take the form of playful and absurd gestures in which banality and irreverence occasion the deepest unhindered laughter.

Dan Graham believes that most of his favorite art involves subversion through humor: “The use of dead-pan, ironic humor in the work of my two favorite Pop artists was a big influence on my work. My magazine page insertion “Side Effects/ Common Drugs” (1966) was influenced by Lichtenstein, whereas my “Star of David” (1996) and “Yin/Yang” (1997/2002) pavilions were influenced by the ‘mock’ monuments using parody by Oldenburg. I chose the artists and work because I am a big fan. Many of them are at the top of their game.” -- Dan Graham

An earlier version of Deep Comedy was presented at Ballroom in Marfa, Texas in Spring/ Summer 2007.

Dan Graham’s work will be the subject of a major U.S. retrospective opening in February 2009 at MoCA Los Angeles and touring to the Whitney Museum of American Art (June 2009), and the Walker Art Center (Fall 2009). In conjunction with the Whitney venue in the summer of 2009, he will present a collaborative project of five pavilions in the New York Botanical Garden. In 2000-2001 Graham’s work was featured in a major European retrospective survey for which an accompanying catalogue raisonne, Dan Graham: Works 1965-2000 was published by Richter Verlag. The exhibition opened at Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Serralves, Porto, and travelled to Paris, Otterloo, Helsinki, and Düsseldorf. His work has been included in countless international group exhibitions including the Venice Biennale 2005 and 2003; Documenta VII, IX, and X in Kassel, and Skulptur Projekte ’87 and ’97, Münster.

Sylvia Chivaratanond is an independent curator and consultant. Her projects have included exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; and 2003 Venice Biennale, among others. On occasion she has been known to alternate between laughter and bellowing cries.

Please join us at the opening reception on Wednesday, June 25th from 6-8 pm.

The gallery is open Monday - Saturday, 10 am – 6 pm. During July summer hours will be Monday-Friday, 10 am – 6 pm.

For further information, please contact the gallery at: 212 977 7160.

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8. Dan Perjovschi, Tadej Pogačar, FF Alumns, in Ljubljana, Slovenia, opening June 12

THE RENAMING MACHINE

EXHIBITION: 12-19 June, 2008
OPENING: 12 June, 2008, 8 P.M.
CONFERENCE: 13 June, 2008, 12 - 7:00 P.M.

Curated by Suzana Milevska

JAKOPIC GALLERY
Slovenska 9
1000 Ljubljana
Slovenia

http://www.zavod-parasite.si

EDNOOKI, Albert Heta, IRWIN, Hristina Ivanoska, Sanja Iveković, Tanja Lažetić/Dejan Habicht, MONUMENT, Oliver Musoviќ, Dan Perjovschi, Tadej Pogačar & P.A.R.A.S.I.T.E. Museum of Contemporary Art, Sašo Stanojkoviќ, Žaneta Vangeli

The P.A.R.A.S.I.T.E. Institute – Ljubljana is pleased to announce the launch of The Renaming Machine project with the opening of an exhibition on 12 June at the Jakopič Gallery in Ljubljana, and on the following day, a one-day conference.

According to Jacques Derrida's On the Name one gives names to the ones he/she loves because to give a name to someone is an ultimate gift. The question posed by the Renaming Machine is whether this can be true for renaming and what residues after the renaming overwrites the old references on the historic »mystic pad«.
The project The Renaming Machine looks at the complex entanglements involved in the political and cultural processes of renaming. Its main concept reflects the crucial need to question to what extent renaming has influenced the construction and destabilisation of the memory of national, cultural and personal identities and what actually happens in the field of representation, visual culture and politics whenever names are replaced or assigned by the renaming “apparatus”. Alongside the arbitrary nature of names and other theoretical implications of renaming, the project examines clandestine patterns of the “desiring renaming machine” at work behind the dominant social machines. In the Balkans, a region that abounds with the politics of renaming, the changes in the names of institutions, peoples, languages, toponyms and states were usually viewed as a way to protect long-term political interests and ensure the domination over a territory. The conceptual “war of names” that as an outwitting game continues between Greece and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, is the best example of how the endlessly postponed event of renaming can enable a “state of exception”.
The project will examine various artistic, cultural and theoretical phenomena associated with renaming: identitarian and gender politics, the right of self-determination, nominalism, descriptions and direct referents, signature, facsimile and deconstruction of originality, proper names, performative speech acts, symbols and insignia of states, nations, ethnicities, overwriting the memory of cities, streets, and monuments, renaming as appropriation of subjects and territories, the name of the father/symptom-names, pseudonyms, anonymity, and (re)naming of art groups and movements, divine and secret names, economic value of names in branding and copy right, etc.

Conference Programme
13 June, 12 – 7 p.m.

12:00- 13:30
Traces of Memory: Writing, Erasing and Forgetting
Ivaylo Ditchev: Educating the dispersed gaze
Aldo Milohnić: No Name
Moderator: Suzana Milevska

14:00 – 15:00
Imaginary Institution of Naming/Renaming
Dušan Mandić: IRWIN/NSK: Political and cultural implications of naming/renaming
Albert Heta: Embassy and Pavilion
Moderator: Lana Zdravković

16:00-17:00
Desiring Machines of Renaming
Suzana Milevska: Potentialities of Renaming: Negation or Agency
Tanja Lažetić, Dejan Habicht: No Remembrance, No Comradeship
Moderator: Slavčo Dimitrov

17:15-19:00
Discussion About an Artwork:
The Politics of Memory/Lecture room no 1: An Archive Perspective on Renaming
Monument group: Darinka Pop-Mitić, Svebor Midžić, Branimir Stojanović, Milica Tomić

A comprehensive publication edited by the Skopje-based curator and theorist Suzana Milevska and published by the P.A.R.A.S.I.T.E. Institute is planned as the culminating segment of the project.

This two-year project consisting of a series of curated exhibitions and conferences, research-based art projects and public discussions, is being realised as part of Patterns, the new cultural programme of the ERSTE Foundation, in a partnership between the P.A.R.A.S.I.T.E. Institute – Ljubljana, The Peace Institute – Ljubljana, press to exit project space – Skopje, and Stacion – Prishtina.

The exhibition is made possible by the enormous contribution of the participating artists as well as the generous support of the ERSTE Foundation, European Cultural Foundation (ECF), The Municipality of Ljubljana, Ministry of Culture of Republic of Slovenia, The Swiss Cultural Programme – Macedonia, The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Slovenia, Division for International Cultural Relations.

Contact:
P.A.R.A.S.I.T.E. Institute, Hruševska 66, 1000 Ljubljana, www.zavod-parasite.si
Tel. +386 1 542 56 85, E-mail: renamingmachine@yahoo.com

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9. Joseph Nechvatal, Robert Rauschenberg, FF Alumns, now online at http://post.thing.net/blog/244

Rhizomatic Rauschenberg :
a personal appreciation on the occasion of his death
@
http://post.thing.net/blog/244

Telepresently Yours,
Joseph Nechvatal
http://www.nechvatal.net
Images of my Paris show:
http://www.eyewithwings.net/nechvatal/Paris07/WWWParis07.htm

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10. Terry Braunstein, FF Alumn, in Almeria, Spain, thru July 13

Terry Braunstein, FF Alumn, large artists book featured at Centro Andaluz de la Fotografia, Almeria, Spain during Enfoques (Approaches) in conjunction with Primer Encuentro Internacional de Centros de Fotogafia (the First International Conference of Photographic Centers) May 30 - July 13, 2008.

Thanks!

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11. Donna Henes, FF Alumn, in Battery Park, Manhattan, June 20, and more

Dear Folks,

Here is a solstice reminder. Please note: the times
are PM, not AM! The day and time couldn't be better
for an accessible event (for a change)!

Remember, there is no rain date for the solstice. The
events are always rain or shine.

Hope to see you at one or both. If you want to volunteer,
to help set up, please let me know.

Sizzling Solstice blessings,

xxMama Donna

Count 'em. Not one but two!

Celebrate the Summer Soulstice with Mama Donna:

SIZZLING SOLSTICE CELEBRATION
Friday, June 20, 2008

Event begins 7:30PM
Solstice moment 7:59PM

Battery Park
Korean War Memorial
(The plaza with the eagle statue and standing tablets
right on the river just south of Castle Clinton)
4/5 to Bowling Green
1 to South Ferry
R/W to Whitehall Street

SUNSET SOLSTICE CEREMONY
Saturday, June 21, 2008

Event Begins 7:30PM
Sunset moment 8:25PM

Socrates Sculpture Park
Long Island City, Queens
N or W to Broadway (Queens)
Walk 8 blocks west on Broadway to the corner
of Vernon Blvd.

Both events are free!
And both events are RAIN OR SHINE!

Bring kids, dogs, spirit and drums.

Donna Henes is an internationally renown urban shaman,
award-winning author, popular speaker, and workshop leader
whose joyful celebrations of celestial events have introduced
ancient traditional rituals and contemporary ceremonies to
millions of people in more than 100 cities since 1972. She
has published four books, a CD, an acclaimed quarterly journal
and writes a column for UPI Religion and Spirituality Forum.
Mama Donna, as she is affectionately called, maintains a
ceremonial center, spirit shop, ritual practice and consultancy
in Exotic Brooklyn, NY where she works with individuals,
groups, institutions, municipalities and corporations to create
meaningful ceremonies for every imaginable occasion.

For information about upcoming events and services contact:

Mama Donna's Tea Garden & Healing Haven
PO Box 380403
Exotic Brooklyn, New York, NY 11238-0403
Phone: 718/857-1343
Email: CityShaman@aol.com
www.DonnaHenes.net
www.MamaDonnasSpiritShop.com/
www.TheQueenofMySelf.com

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12. RENO, Holly Hughes, Deb Margolin, Salley May, Lucy Sexton, FF Alumns, at Theaterlab, Manhattan, June 17-21

THE RENO FOLLIES Noted comedic monologist Reno presents herself and some other well known screwballs, (friends of hers), presenting new work for a week in June at Theaterlab. The writer/performers include Reno, Deb Margolin, Holly Hughes, Lucy Sexton + Mike Ivey, Renita Martin, Merri Milwe, Brooke Johnson, and Charlotte Colavin. Each night, a different lineup, with Reno every night,.

Where: Theaterlab 137 W 14th St, Second Floor, White Box Theatre
Between 6th and 7th Aves. Subways: 1, 2, 3, F, L

When: June 17 through June 21, Tuesday through Saturday
All performances – 8 PM

Tickets: $20 Smarttix or Theaterlab box office 212-929-2545
Reservations recommended

Reno hosts and performs every night, with the following lineup:
June 17: Holly Hughes, Lucy Show (Lucy Sexton & Mike Ivey), Salley May
June 18: Brooke Johnson
June 19: Deb Margolin, Merri Milwe, Marian Fontana, Char Colavin
June 20: Brooke Johnson, Deb Margolin
June 21: Merri Milwe, Renita Martin

Reno – Although Reno has made several films and tv shows for hbo, bravo and others, live performance, preferably in front of smart folks, is her preferred medium. Her website is citizenreno.com

Deb Margolin is an American performance artist and playwright. Coming to prominence in the 1980's, as script-writer and performer in the feminist theater troupe Split Britches (of which she was a founding member), Margolin has since gone solo in a string of one-woman shows, which she continues to perform. A compilation of her scripts, Of All The Nerve: Deb Margolin SOLO, was published in 1999, edited by literary theorist Lynda Hart, who wrote commentary on each piece. Margolin was the recipient of a 1999-2000 Obie Award for Sustained Excellence of Performance. In 2005, Margolin won the Kesselring Prize for her play, Three Seconds in the Key, a multi-character play which reflected her own experiences with Hodgkin's Disease. She currently teaches playwriting and performance as an associate professor at Yale University. Her most recent work and performance is entitled O Yes I Will, a detailed account of her experiences and insights on being under general anaesthesia.

HOLLY HUGHES, now a University of Michigan professor in the School of Art and Design is an internationally acclaimed performance artist whose work maps the troubled fault lines of identity. Her combination of poetic imagery and political satire has earned her wide attention and placed her work at the center of America's culture wars.

MERRI MILWE, a founding member of the socially progressive OFF WORLD THEATRE, works with playwrights developing and directing new works for the stage.

BROOKE JOHNSON, a Certified Advanced Funny Person since the early 60’s, was last seen in a mug shot on page 6, on Hope and Faith, Law and Order, and in her one woman show “Slightly Damaged”

Renita Martin has been called a lot of things -- "brash and lyrical" (Boston Globe) and "crazy, sexy, cool" by those who know her well; she was last seen in "It Is the Seeing" at the Cherry Lane theatre in New York.

SALLEY MAY has been a NYC based performing artist since 1987, putting on shows, curating P.S.122's Avant-Garde-Arama series, and teaching theater workshops to mentally ill populations.

LUCY SEXTON/MIKE IVEY revive a minimal version of their popular satire of humiliation vehicles, “The Lucy Show” starring their alter egos, respectively, The Factress, and Vendetta "Baby Asparagus" K. Starr.

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13. Michael Smith, FF Alumn, at Electronic Arts Intermix, Manhattan, June 17-18

MICHAEL SMITH: TWO EVENINGS AT EAI
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 6:30 PM
MICHAEL SMITH + JOSHUA WHITE: ARTISTS' TALK & SCREENING

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 6:30 PM
MICHAEL SMITH: BABY IKKI BIRTHDAY PARTY: PERFORMANCE

MICHAEL SMITH + JOSHUA WHITE
Artists' Talk and Screening

Tuesday, June 17, 2008
6:30 pm

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York
535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor
Admission free

More information:
Over the last 11 years, Michael Smith and Joshua White have collaborated on numerous videos and installations that incorporate Smith's deadpan and wide-eyed alter-ego, "Mike." Gullible and ever-hopeful, Smith's eponymous character is an Everyman living in a media-saturated world that he does not really understand. Since their collaboration began in 1997, Smith and White have worked together on a series of increasingly elaborate and sophisticated installations and videos, featuring Mike as an artist, struggling businessman, or entrepreneur. Often the videos are incorporated into the installations and function as artifacts from Mike's world, or as videos produced by Mike. At EAI, Smith and White will screen works that they have produced together and speak about their long collaboration exploring Mike's hyper-ordinary world.

MICHAEL SMITH
BABY IKKI BIRTHDAY PARTY
Performance

Wednesday, June 18, 2008
6:30 pm

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York
535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor
Admission free

More information

For the first time in more than a decade, Michael Smith will stage a birthday party for his legendary character, Baby Ikki, in New York City at EAI. At times comedic, at times deeply unsettling, Baby Ikki breaks through social boundaries. In character, Smith becomes a cranky explorer wandering in a new world. Lacking consideration and caution, Baby Ikki possesses an abundance of curiosity and has an insatiable appetite for attention. Not yet able to speak, frustration drives the baby to attempt communication using any means possible.

During the performance, the perpetually 18-month-old Baby Ikki, played by Smith, will celebrate his 33rd birthday. Party guests are welcome to bring age-appropriate gifts for Baby Ikki that will be incorporated into the performance. Refreshments will be served.

The retrospective Mike's World: Michael Smith & Joshua White (and other collaborators) opened at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, Texas in 2007, and is currently on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia until August 3, 2008.

Michael Smith received a B.A. from Colorado College in 1973, and studied in the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program. He has received numerous awards and grants, including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation. Smith's video works, performances and installations have been exhibited internationally at a range of venues, including Christine Burgin Gallery, New York; Leo Castelli Gallery, New York; Caroline's Comedy Club; Henson International Puppet Festival; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York; Hales Gallery, London; Galleria Emi Fontana, Milan and EDB Projects in Amsterdam. Smith is currently an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin and lives in Austin, Texas and New York.

Joshua White is an artist, director and producer based in New York City. He made his mark as the creator and director of the legendary Joshua Light Show at Bill Graham's Fillmore East in the late 1960s. White went on to design psychedelic light shows for Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane, and Yayoi Kusama, among others. Later, he directed episodes of television programs such as Seinfeld, The Max Headroom Show, and Inside the Actors' Studio. White's film, Liquid Loops was recently included in the exhibition Summer of Love: Art of the Psychedelic Era at Tate Liverpool and the Whitney Museum of American Art. White studied Theater at Carnegie Tech (Now Carnegie Mellon University) and Film at the University of Southern California.

About EAI
Founded in 1971, Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is one of the world's leading nonprofit resources for video art and interactive media. EAI's core program is the international distribution of a major collection of new and historical media works by artists. EAI's activities include a preservation program, viewing access, educational services, online resources, and public programs such as exhibitions and lectures. The Online Catalogue provides a comprehensive resource on the 175 artists and 3,000 works in the EAI collection, including extensive research materials. www.eai.org

Please visit EAI's new project, The Online Resource Guide for Exhibiting, Collecting & Preserving Media Art, a comprehensive source for information on single-channel video, computer-based art, and media installation: http://resourceguide.eai.org

Electronic Arts Intermix
535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10011
(212) 337-0680 tel
(212) 337-0679 fax
info@eai.org

EAI's public programs are supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Michael Smith and Joshua White are 2007 Artist Fellowship recipients of the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA). Their presentation is co-sponsored by Artists & Audiences Exchange, a NYFA public program. Michael Smith's performance is supported, in part, by funds received from the Experimental Television Center. The Experimental Television Center's Presentation Funds Program is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts.

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14. Mona Hatoum, FF Alumn, at Parasol Unit, London, UK, preview June 12

Present Tense: Mona Hatoum
13 June - 8 August 2008
preview 12 June, 6 - 8 pm

Parasol unit
foundation for contemporary art
14 Wharf Road, London N1 7RW
T +44 (0)20 7490 7373
F +44 (0)20 7490 7373
info@parasol-unit.org

http://www.parasol-unit.org

This June, Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art will present an exhibition of important works by the British Palestinian artist Mona Hatoum. The exhibition will present works as yet unseen in London that cover more than a decade of Hatoum’s career. Including large-scale installations, sculpture and works on paper, this exhibition will illustrate the scope of Hatoum’s varied artistic practice that, through residencies and travels, draws its influence and materials from very different cultures and locales. The works in this show were made in places as diverse as Cairo, Stockholm, Jerusalem, rural France and a shaker community in North America.

In the course of her international career Hatoum has created work in a variety of media, including performance, sculpture, video, installation and photography. Her work is rooted in notions of displacement, uncertainty and power structures, subjects that are addressed through the use of familiar, everyday domestic objects transformed into foreign, uncanny things. Hatoum’s practice also deals with issues related to the making of art and, in particular, with questions about the inherent physicality of sculpture as well as our relationship to the formal concerns of space and material.

The works on show at Parasol unit will include Mobile Home II, 2006, an installation of furniture and household possessions that continually shift along horizontal wires strung between two metal street barriers. In perpetual, barely perceptible animation, the work could be a metaphor for a population in constant flux and movement resulting in a world where national and social identities are never fixed. References to unrest and violence will also be evident in the installations Horizon, 1998–99 and Misbah, 2006-07 and Round and Round, 2007, all of which play with the forms of toy soldiers with guns poised for action. In Undercurrent, 2004, cloth-covered electrical cables are woven into a two-metre-square carpet fringed with light-bulbs which illuminate and fade with a mesmerising melancholic pulse, hinting at an ever-present threat to stability. Notions of violence will similarly be referenced through a new sculpture, Nature morte aux g renades, 2008, a collection of colourful crystal shapes resembling hand grenades, placed on a steel trolley. The contrast between the bright, confectionary-like colours of the shapes and the subtext of danger highlights the duality of Hatoum’s approach, blurring the distinction between subject and context in a disturbing manner.

Another work on show will be Present Tense, produced during a residency in Jerusalem in 1996. A floor piece, Present Tense is made out of blocks of local olive oil soap with red glass beads imbedded into its surface, delineating the outline of the map of the Oslo Agreement between Israel and the Palestinian Authorities. Since making this work, Hatoum has frequently used the map as a motif in her work, most recently through a process of material-removal. In both Projection (cotton), 2006 and Baluchi (blue), 2008 the ground appears to have been eroded or dissolved away, leaving a negative space in the form of the ‘Peters Projection’ world map, an image that depicts an accurate

distribution of land mass in its true proportions, as opposed to the more common maps drawn from a Western-centric perspective.

Mona Hatoum was born in Beirut, Lebanon in 1952. She came to the UK in 1975, where she remained following the outbreak of civil war in her homeland, studying at Byam Shaw School of Art and Slade School of Art, and now divides her time between London and Berlin. Hatoum’s career has seen solo exhibitions at museums worldwide including Centre Pompidou, Paris (1994); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (1997), which toured to the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, Oxford and Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh; Castello di Rivoli, Turin (1999); Tate Britain, London (2000); Hamburger Kunsthalle, Kunstmuseum Bonn, Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall (2004); Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2005); and group exhibitions such as The Turner Prize (1995); Documenta 11, Kassel (2002); Venice Biennale (1995 and 2005) and The Biennale of Sydney (2006). Her work is held in collections across the world including Tate, London; Centre Pompidou, Paris; British Council, London; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Los Angeles County Museum of Contemporary Art. Hatoum was nominated for the Turner Prize in 1995. In 2004 she was awarded the Roswitha Haftmann Stiftung Prize (Zurich) and became the first visual arts recipient of the prestigious Sonning Prize (Copenhagen).

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art is an independent educational charity devoted to promoting contemporary art for the benefit of the public. The core activity of the foundation is to showcase the work of the contemporary leading and young international artists in various media. Each year Parasol unit mounts three to four exhibitions in various media, and each is usually accompanied by a publication. In order to encourage the widest possible access to its exhibition programme, Parasol unit does not charge admission fees.

Events:
3rd July, 7.30pm – First Thursday
Renowned critic and writer Michael Archer will discuss Mona Hatoum’s works in the exhibition. Michael Archer interviewed Mona Hatoum for her 1997 monograph, published by Phaidon. As well as contributing to several other monographs and numerous catalogues, he writes regularly for Artforum and Art Monthly, and is the author of Art Since 1960 (Thames & Hudson 1997).

Booking is essential due to limited places.
To book please call 020 7490 7373, or alternatively e-mail info@parasol-unit.org

Opening hours: Tues-Sat, 10 am-6 pm. Sun 12-5 pm
First Thursday of each month open until 9pm

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15. Ruth Hardinger, FF Alumn, in Washington Square Park, Manhattan, June 17

You are invited to attend an informal reception for the artist:
Ruth Hardinger
Tues. June 17*
6-8pm
*in the event of rain, the reception will take place Thursday, June 19, 6-8pm.
Washington Square Park, across from the installation @
Washington Square Windows, (80 Washington Square E.)
This reception is in celebration of the installation, Reverse Count.

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16. Tobaron Waxman, FF Alumn, in Tel Aviv, Israel, June 12-14

STILL LIFE : ISRAEL EATS ITSELF
direction - Tobaron Waxman
audio and 5.1 surround composition - Yoni Niv, Elad Shniderman
5.1 audio mastering- Paul Geluso
actor - Adam Paolozza
camera - Leif Harmsen

Mining the intersection of gender formations, cultural identities, and national identities, Waxman situates his research at the place where the human body becomes the subject of a state, and citizenship makes moral and ethical claims upon our bodies. Still Life: Israel Eats Itself is a 4D portrait of a gendered identity invented by and then cannibalized by the state. Incorporating an interview with a PTSD afflicted veteran of 5 wars, this video installation shot on super8 and surveillance cam uses the body as an analogue to landscape, land occupation, and ‘Holy Land’, to interrogate concepts
of kinship, nation state, and Middle East border conflict. 'Still
Life: Israel Eats Itself' was produced with support from the Toronto Arts Council and Harvestworks Digital Media NYC.

http://www.tobaron.com/eats.html

About VDance June 12 - 14, Tel Aviv Cinematheque.

Vdance – International Video Dance Festival, was established in 2006 and takes place at the Tel-Aviv Cinematheque.
The festival has successfully become the main platform in Israel for screenings of video dance works and dance films and enjoys a wide audience from a diverse background.
The Tel-Aviv Cinematheque venue, turns during the three days of the festival into a place of dance and movement, all happening on the screen, as dozens of exciting new works by Israeli and International artists are screened.

http://www.vdance.co.il

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17. Frank Moore, FF Alumn, call for Electors for Presidential Campaign

A CALL FOR ELECTORS!

Frank Moore has been running for President of the United States since the early summer of 2006. Please see his website at: http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/ With his running mate, Vice-Presidential candidate Susan Block, he is attempting to certify as an official write-in Presidential candidate in the general election in November 2008 in as many states as possible. Frank has received a startling amount of press for a "third-party" candidate for president. Even mainstream European media has covered his campaign!
Please see http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/news.html for more about media coverage of the campaign both in Europe and the United States.
Frank Moore is the contact for his campaign: fmoore@eroplay.com

Moore, a world-renowned performance artist based in Berkeley, California, has put forth a comprehensive platform rivaling the major party candidates under the title, “The Just Makes Sense Party”. You can read his platform at http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/ .

Moore’s grassroots campaign proposes radical changes to the current system of politics and government in the U.S., bringing in what he calls a "web work of caring.” He writes that “it is all about caring and choice,” and says that he will work for, among many other ideas, a guaranteed minimum income (GMI) for every U.S. citizen of $1,000 per month, tied to the cost of living and not taxable. He also proposes universal free pre-natal-to-the-grave health care. You can see a comparison of Frank Moore's health care plan with that of John McCain, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton at http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/healthcare-grid.htm .

Moore needs presidential electors pledged to him in many states to qualify to receive write-in votes in the November Presidential Election. For instance, in California, he will need 55 people to serve as electors -- otherwise, any write-in votes for Frank in the November election in California will not be counted. Frank needs electors in ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, CONNECTICUT, D.C., FLORIDA, KENTUCKY, MAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, MISSOURI, NORTH CAROLINA, NORTH DAKOTA, OHIO, and TEXAS. If you live in one of these states and are willing to be an elector, email Frank at fmoore@eroplay.com.

The Moore/Block campaign is calling for supporters nationwide to participate in this inspiring grassroots Presidential campaign by becoming his electors, or simply spreading the news of the campaign. As electors pledged to Frank Moore, they would place their "electoral vote" in the Electoral College for Moore if he wins the popular vote in their state. Being an elector for Frank Moore does not mean that they must vote for Frank in the November Presidential election ... however, Moore said that he welcomes everyone’s write-in vote in November! http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/be_an_elector.html
Links to check out:
http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/ -- Main Presidential website
http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/blog/index.html -- Frank Moore for President 2008 Blog
http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/events.html -- Events
http://www.frankmooreforpresident08.com/news.html -- News
http://www.youtube.com/frankmooreforprez08 -- Platform Videos
http://www.eroplay.com/Cave/resume.html -- Frank Moore's Resume
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Moore_%28performance_artist%29 -- Frank Moore's Wikipedia entry
In Freedom,
Frank Moore

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18. Jenny Holzer, FF Alumn, at EVO Gallery, Santa Fe, NM, opening June 19

Jenny Holzer
The Venice Installation
Gallery D

Opening June 19th, 2008

EVO Gallery
554 South Guadalupe Street
Santa Fe, NM 87501
505-982-4610
director@evogallery.org
http://www.evogallery.orgEVO Gallery is pleased to offer an iconic installation by Jenny Holzer. Gallery D was included in the United States Pavilion at the 1990 Venice Biennale, for which Holzer was awarded the Leone d’Oro (Golden Lion prize) for best pavilion. She was the first woman artist to be so honored.

The Gallery D installation is comprised of alternating red and white Italian marble tiles arranged in a diamond pattern with inscriptions from Holzer’s Truisms, her best known text, carved into the red marble tiles. The text areas are illuminated by pin spotlights. Three marble benches run the length of three walls, with text from Holzer’s Inflammatory Essays carved on the top of each bench. For the global audience attending the Biennale, Holzer created the texts in five languages: German, French, Italian, Spanish and English. Her major themes – sex, death, and war – are explored with unflinching directness in this acclaimed installation.

In contrast to Holzer’s well known use of LED signs, Gallery D employs the centuries old art of stone carving to convey the text with a classical austerity that is also brilliant and sensual in the use of materials.

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19. Fiona Templeton, FF Alumn, on Governor’s Island, NY, June 27-29

Medea on the Argo
Medead in Iolcos
From The Medead, an Epic by Fiona Templeton
at Fort Jay, Governor's Island
June 28 &29 2008 2:30 pm, preview June 27 2:30 pm
FREE. Free Ferry.
directed by Fiona Templeton, with
Drew Cortese*, Robert Kya-Hill*, Clarinda MacLow, Dawn Saito*, Peter Sciscioli,
Stephanie Silver, Andrew Zimmerman, supported by Katie Brown and others.
photo Paula Court
Ferries leave Battery Maritime Building, 11 South Street (west of Staten Island Ferry) - subways R, W to Whitehall, 1 to South Ferry. The performance lasts about an hour and a half and moves around the fort. Take 2 pm ferry or earlier (hourly) - return on 4:30 ferry or later. Or spend the day - first ferry out 10 am, last ferry back 7 pm.
Dress for the weather. Bring water.
Supported in part by New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Fund for Culture, and grateful thanks to the National Parks Service and GIPEC.
*courtesy Actors Equity
The Relationship is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization in the state of NY.

(Also UPCOMING: Going - new work- at Chashama in September)
queries to home@therelationship.orgwww.therelationship.org

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20. Michael Smith, FF Alumn, at Electronic Arts Intermix, Manhattan, June 17-18

MICHAEL SMITH: TWO EVENINGS AT EAI
TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 6:30 PM
MICHAEL SMITH + JOSHUA WHITE: ARTISTS' TALK & SCREENING
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 6:30 PM
MICHAEL SMITH: BABY IKKI BIRTHDAY PARTY: PERFORMANCE

MICHAEL SMITH + JOSHUA WHITE
Artists' Talk and Screening
Tuesday, June 17, 2008
6:30 pm
Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York
535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor
Admission free

More information
Over the last 11 years, Michael Smith and Joshua White have collaborated on numerous videos and installations that incorporate Smith's deadpan and wide-eyed alter-ego, "Mike." Gullible and ever-hopeful, Smith's eponymous character is an Everyman living in a media-saturated world that he does not really understand. Since their collaboration began in 1997, Smith and White have worked together on a series of increasingly elaborate and sophisticated installations and videos, featuring Mike as an artist, struggling businessman, or entrepreneur. Often the videos are incorporated into the installations and function as artifacts from Mike's world, or as videos produced by Mike. At EAI, Smith and White will screen works that they have produced together and speak about their long collaboration exploring Mike's hyper-ordinary world.

MICHAEL SMITH
BABY IKKI BIRTHDAY PARTY
Performance
Wednesday, June 18, 2008
6:30 pm
Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York
535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor
Admission free
More information
For the first time in more than a decade, Michael Smith will stage a birthday party for his legendary character, Baby Ikki, in New York City at EAI. At times comedic, at times deeply unsettling, Baby Ikki breaks through social boundaries. In character, Smith becomes a cranky explorer wandering in a new world. Lacking consideration and caution, Baby Ikki possesses an abundance of curiosity and has an insatiable appetite for attention. Not yet able to speak, frustration drives the baby to attempt communication using any means possible.

During the performance, the perpetually 18-month-old Baby Ikki, played by Smith, will celebrate his 33rd birthday. Party guests are welcome to bring age-appropriate gifts for Baby Ikki that will be incorporated into the performance. Refreshments will be served.

The retrospective Mike's World: Michael Smith & Joshua White (and other collaborators) opened at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, Texas in 2007, and is currently on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia until August 3, 2008.

Michael Smith received a B.A. from Colorado College in 1973, and studied in the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program. He has received numerous awards and grants, including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation. Smith's video works, performances and installations have been exhibited internationally at a range of venues, including Christine Burgin Gallery, New York; Leo Castelli Gallery, New York; Caroline's Comedy Club; Henson International Puppet Festival; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York; Hales Gallery, London; Galleria Emi Fontana, Milan and EDB Projects in Amsterdam. Smith is currently an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin and lives in Austin, Texas and New York.

Joshua White is an artist, director and producer based in New York City. He made his mark as the creator and director of the legendary Joshua Light Show at Bill Graham's Fillmore East in the late 1960s. White went on to design psychedelic light shows for Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane, and Yayoi Kusama, among others. Later, he directed episodes of television programs such as Seinfeld, The Max Headroom Show, and Inside the Actors' Studio. White's film, Liquid Loops was recently included in the exhibition Summer of Love: Art of the Psychedelic Era at Tate Liverpool and the Whitney Museum of American Art. White studied Theater at Carnegie Tech (Now Carnegie Mellon University) and Film at the University of Southern California.

About EAI
Founded in 1971, Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is one of the world's leading nonprofit resources for video art and interactive media. EAI's core program is the international distribution of a major collection of new and historical media works by artists. EAI's activities include a preservation program, viewing access, educational services, online resources, and public programs such as exhibitions and lectures. The Online Catalogue provides a comprehensive resource on the 175 artists and 3,000 works in the EAI collection, including extensive research materials. www.eai.org

Please visit EAI's new project, The Online Resource Guide for Exhibiting, Collecting & Preserving Media Art, a comprehensive source for information on single-channel video, computer-based art, and media installation: http://resourceguide.eai.org

Electronic Arts Intermix
535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10011
(212) 337-0680 tel
(212) 337-0679 fax
info@eai.org

EAI's public programs are supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Michael Smith and Joshua White are 2007 Artist Fellowship recipients of the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA). Their presentation is co-sponsored by Artists & Audiences Exchange, a NYFA public program. Michael Smith's performance is supported, in part, by funds received from the Experimental Televsion Center. The Experimental Television Center's Presentation Funds Program is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts.

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21. Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc. in the New York Times, June 12

The New York Times
June 12, 2008
Excerpt
‘No Wave: Post-Punk’
By THURSTON MOORE and BYRON COLEY

Foreword

New York City during the 1970s was a beautiful, ravaged slag — impoverished and neglected after suffering from decades of abuse and battery. She stunk of sewage, sex, rotting fish, and day-old diapers. She leaked from every pore.

[Expletive] was already percolating by the time I hit Manhattan as a teen terror in 1976. Inspired by the manic rantings of Lester Bangs in Creem magazine, the Velvet Underground's sarcastic wit, the glamour of the New York Dolls' first album, and the poetic scat of Horses, by Patti Smith, I snuck out my bedroom window, jumped on a Greyhound, and crash-landed in a bigger ghetto than the one I had just escaped from. But with two hundred bucks in my pocket tucked inside a notebook full of misanthropic screed, a baby face that belied a hustler's instinct, and a killer urge to create in order to destroy everything that had originally inspired me, I didn't give a flying [expletive] if the Bowery smelled like dog [expletive].

I wasn't expecting the toilets at CBGB's to be the bookends to Duchamp's urinal, but then again, maybe 1977 had more in common with 1917 than anyone at the time could have imagined. The anti-art invasion of Dada in Switzerland and the surrealist pranksters who shadowed them had a blast pissing all over everybody's expectations. The anti-everything of No Wave was a collective caterwaul that defied categorization, defiled the audience, despised convention, [expletive] in the face of history, and then split. It's only a movement in retrospect. Post-Suicide, pre­Sonic Youth New York was the devil's dirty litter box. No Wave was the waste product of Taxi Driver, Times Square, the Son of Sam, the blackout of '77, widespread political corruption, rampant poverty, the failure of the Summer of Love, the [expletive] of Charles Manson, the hell of the Vietnam War, and a desperate need to violently rebel against the complacency of a zombie nation dumbed down by sitcoms and disco. Yes, we were angry, ugly, snotty, and loud. But better to brutalize the audience with screeching guitars and piercing screams than to beat them over the head with fists and feet ... which, okay, sometimes we did, but most nights we'd rather [expletive] than fight. You guessed right if you thought the toilets of CBGB's sang a song of diseased lust to my raging hormones.

Beneath the scowls of derision, the antagonism and acrimony, and the nearly unbearable shrillness that was our soundtrack, we were howling with delight, laughing like lunatics in the madhouse that was New York City, thrilled to be rubbing up against the freaks and other outcasts, who somehow, for some unknowable reason, had all decided to run to land's end and all at once scream their bloody heads off.

—Lydia Lunch, July 10, 2007

IN THE BEGINNING
Despite the presumptive legacy of CBGB, the Ramones, and Punk magazine, New York was never really a punk-rock town. It actually produced very little in the way of punk qua punk. The genuine tradition of New York bands was art rock, with punk being merely just one of its aspects. In a certain light, even the Ramones, who presented such a complete, high-concept package, could be viewed and surely were by the boho brain trust, as some kind of performance-art piece. And that light — buzzing on and off like a broken bodega neon — suffused the desperate and panting dog that was the lower Manhattan scene of the mid-1970s.

New York's alluring danger reeked of outlaw freedom and possibility. Artists, writers, musicians, hangers-on, and wannabes of all stripes were drawn to its incendiary profile from across the globe. Magazines like Lenny Kaye¹s Rock Scene and Andy Warhol's Interview illuminated a vision of ravaged glamour in the faces of the crowds at the Mercer Arts Center and Max's Kansas City. It was still fairly easy to find affordable living space. Maybe not in SoHo, but if you went a bit farther south or farther east, there were neighborhoods where a tenement railroad apartment or a deserted storefront or a raw loft could be had. As time went on, these possibilities shrank and became farther from the center of things, but, by god, the Bowery was still the Bowery, with squalid slag heaps and zonked bums sprawled senseless, when seen-it-all music maven and art-schlepper Hilly Kristal opened CBGB and OMFUG in 1973.

The earliest generation of important New York bands was clearly part of a tradition that stretched back to (at least) the Beat era. Patti Smith and Television, in particular, had a literate thrust informed as much by the sophistication of their reading as by the crudeness of sonic models like the New York Dolls. There was also that most anomalous, most New York-centric of groups, Suicide. Lydia Lunch describes Alan Vega's image as "a perverted Puerto Rican, Elvis Presley­damaged, psychotic acid casualty," a sketch that rings true. Matched with the implacable, shades-masked, deranged nursery-pop keyboard miniaturism of Martin Rev, Suicide were an overwhelming experience in live performance. Love them or hate them, there was no way to ignore them. As writer Roy Trakin notes, "They were really the first modern rock band to blend music and noise together, raising the question of whether noise was music and vice versa." This may have been a common question in serious art music circles during previous generations, but it was not usually asked by rock fans at the time, no matter how far underground they lived.

Regardless of the fact that No Wave is nominally categorized as "post-punk" music (meaning, in this case, only that it could not have occurred before punk), its story begins in the earliest days of the New York New Wave scene before it was designated as anything more (or less) than just plain old "underground" music.

This book is decidedly focused on the core bands that became what is historically known as No Wave between the years of 1976 and 1980 — the primary four as documented on the Brian Eno-produced No New York LP: the Contortions, Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, Mars, and DNA — all of which, despite Mars drummer Nancy Arlen's relationship with the art world, were considered more East Village habitués than SoHo aesthetes. The SoHo bands, seemingly more attuned to the avant-garde performance room the Kitchen and the downtown "alternative spaces" such as Franklin Furnace and Artists Space, were Theoretical Girls, Daily Life, the Static, the Gynecologists, Tone Death, Terminal, and Arsenal. Of course, the bands hardly had such strict geographic distinctions — all everyone really wanted was to play at CBGB and Max's. This was true for the No Wave groups Blinding Headache, Information, and Red Transistor as well as Dark Day and Beirut Slump, two significant bands evolving from DNA and Teenage Jesus.

In and around the bands were personalities as infamous as the bands themselves‹from Anya Phillips and Diego Cortez to Boris Policeband and the Seidman sisters to the artist-filmmaker axis of Beth and Scott B, John Lurie, Eric Mitchell, Vivienne Dick, et al. Of course many bands, artists, writers, and individuals intermingled contemporaneously with this faction, most obviously the inspired cliques and circles among the Mudd Club­Glenn O'Brien's TV Party scene and the first-generation Max's Kansas City­CBGB desperado elite, some of whom poke their beautiful heads into this photo essay. But our investigation is directly aimed at the connective development of the aforementioned groups.

—Thurston Moore and Byron Coley
Reprinted with permission from "No Wave: Post-Punk" / Abrams Image, 2008.
Copyright 2008 The New York Times

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22. Tim Miller, FF Alumn, now online at advocate.com

Hi All!
HAPPY END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR!
Here's an essay just out I wrote for THE ADVOCATE (the main gay magazine in the U.S.)
http://advocate.com/exclusive_detail_ektid55080.asp
It is my fantasy commencement address to the LGBT artists I have worked with this year at my performance workshop residencies at Colleges/Universities all over the US. Quite fun and a tribute to the amazing students I encounter on my travels around the country teaching and performing.
I do sometimes feel like a performing “queer Johnny Appleseed”, as Tony Kushner referred to me in his introduction to my book Body Blows that he swears he wrote naked as a tribute to moi! I just try to spread the good news about creatively claiming our queerest selves regardless of whether we are straight or gay. This is at the top of my to do list as a Big Fag on Campus. This work I do is by no means just for the gay students -the nongay students may well benefit even more from a huge creative zap allowing their secret powers and lights to shine - but I do have to admit I have a certain soft spot for the lively queer-identified students I work with. Through my shows and performance workshops I do in both the reddest of red and the bluest of blue states, I get a pretty interesting camera angle on the fierce and feisty state of 18-22 year old LGBT Americans. Anyhow, here's the link...also below.
http://advocate.com/exclusive_detail_ektid55080.asp
best, Tim Miller
A QUEER COMMENCEMENT
by Tim Miller for THE ADVOCATE
http://advocate.com/exclusive_detail_ektid55080.asp
When I am not busy crafting my Nobel Prize and Academy Award acceptance speeches, I often take a moment to conjure the commencement address I would inspiringly deliver to the LGBTQIA graduating students at Queer U to mark this juicy time of year of poignant endings and new beginnings. The commencement anthems are sung! The graduation caps are flung! The celebratory shots are slung! What can I possibly say to these fierce and inspiring artist-citizens I get to work with at all my college performance gigs?
Should I channel Larry Kramer… “KEROSENE WORKS BETTER THAN PERFUME!” Hmm, that’s a bit too incendiary.
Or maybe go all literary and highfalutin’…”Perhaps the great gay Greek poet C.P. Cavafy said it best… He who hopes to grow in spirit will have to transcend obedience and respect.” That’ll make them head for the exits.
If you are going to steal, you should always steal from the best: our great, gay President Lincoln. “One score and nineteen years ago, our queer forefathers and mothers at Stonewall etc.” Wait a second, Lincoln knew that the people you speak to already have done the heavy lifting; you just have to look to them and the words will follow.
I perform at around twenty-five colleges every year where I do my wildly queer solo shows. I also lead intensive performance workshops with the local brew of students that gets cobbled together into an ensemble piece of the narratives of their lives and then performed on campus. Through my shows and workshops I do in both the reddest of red and the bluest of blue states, I get a pretty interesting camera angle on the fierce and feisty state of 18-22 year old LGBT Americans.
As I gird my loins -- or at least manage to do my laundry -- and crazily pack my luggage for my big commencement address at Queer U, I would call out to my queer animal guides -- I am a native Californian after all! In my imagination I see the animal mascots of all the institutions of higher learning where I work gathering to help me. Just as the mice and birds in Cinderella’s Disney garret pimp her up for the Ball, I visualize the University of Minnesota’s Goldy Gopher toothily encouraging me to chew boldly at the truth, Southern Methodist University’s Texas Mustang helping me trample down self-doubt, Wisconsin’s Bucky Badger – the sexiest of all the mascots because he has been seriously working out and is wearing no pants! – fluffing me to help face the horrors of changing planes in Dallas or Dulles!
As I step up to the stage, covered with enough polyester rainbow bunting to circle the earth, I realize for inspiration I need only look to at the public performances of some of the queer students that came out of the workshops I did this last academic year. These young artists performed so boldly while witnessed by their communities in sardine packed Student Unions and Theaters. Their stories, their texts, their imagination offer all the inspiration and challenge that any commencement address should be chock full of. I would point to the courage of Travis Acreman in his performance at SMU in Dallas daring to acknowledge and fiercely claim the target on his back that he shares with every gay American. I think of Megan Lenihan at University of Nebraska’s Lied Center for the Performing Arts reading a letter where she comes out to her parents with her parents in the audience and later their family hug would thaw even Bush’s icy heart. I would remember Sentell Harper at Arizona State University exploring his identity as a young black gay man and Robert Galloway at Davidson College in NC rejecting only being seen as the gay clown, forever Jack to Will and Grace. I would invoke Colin Wait and Allison Witham who explored the edgy borders of gay boy sex and the joyous heart rhythm of dyke desire as undergrads on campus at University of Minnesota. All of these performances by these queer citizens of our troubled country offer fierce avenues of hope, desire and open-eyed courage far stronger than any possible commencement address I might concoct. Perhaps with their example and artistry- along with me doing my bit assisted by Bucky Badger in his humpy half-naked glory - there may just be more than a little hope for our country.
Tim Miller is a solo performer and the author of 1001 Beds: Performances, Essays and Travels published personally by Bucky Badger at the University of Wisconsin Press. He can be reached at his website http://hometown.aol.com/millertale

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23. Susana Cook, Murray Hill, FF Alumns, at Leslie/Lohman Gay Art Foundation, Manhattan, June 19, 7-9 pm

http://www.afterellen.com/people/2008/6/pinkandbent
Thursday, June 19th, 7-9pm
I think of you when I is a one-night-only program of diverse performances by, for, and about queer women from the disciplines of performance art, theater, dance, film and video. These short pieces span the breadth and explore the depth of queer experience in both subtle and overt ways. Some artists are drag kings, some are lesbian icons, some are superheroes, some are two-dimensional, some are not women. The night will be emceed by Murray Hill and drag king, Dred.

Artists include: J. Bob Alotta, Lily Baldwin, Susana Cook, J. Dellecave, Dynasty Handbag, Erin Markey, Tara Mateik, Sofia Varino and The Hungry Hearts and Yalinidream.

I think of you when I is a presented in conjunction with Pink & Bent: Art of Queer Women, a show of visual art currently on view at Leslie/Lohman Gay Art Foundation.

Opening reception at 6:30.
Show starts at 7.
$8 suggested donation for the performers at the door (no turned away).
Leslie/Lohman Gay Art Foundation
26 Wooster St. (Grand & Canal), NYC
(www.leslielohman.org)

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24. Lynn Swanson, FF Alumn, in Turin, Italy

Lynn Swanson, FF alumn, shooting "Giallo" in Turin, Italy with director Dario Argento, starring Adrien Brody, Emmanuelle Seigner and Elsa Pataky
The Italian word for yellow is "Giallo". It also refers to stylized crime films of the 1960's and '70's. This time around, Argento (cited recently in the NY Times as the "Italian Hitchcock") returns to his roots with a suspenseful thriller featuring Adrien Brody as detective Enzo Avolfi hunting down the serial killer who has kidnapped the runway model sister (Pataky) of a stewardess (Seigner). This is the fourth time Swanson has worked with Argento and Opera Film as dialect/dialogue coach.

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24. Jody Pinto, FF Alumn, in Philadelphia, PA, June 21-22, and more

June 21& 22
Public Art Network, Americans for the Arts National Conference, Philadelphia.
Jody Pinto will address and co-curate the 2008 Public Art Year in Review. Selecting the twenty best public art projects, both temporary and permanent, the curators will discuss their choices, emerging ideas, and the field of public art.

June 2008-2010
Phoenix, AZ Bridge & Greenway Trail Design - National Competition.
Jody Pinto will be designing a pedestrian bridge and 1/2 mile of Sun Valley trail.
The bridge will span a highway, connecting the trails. She will be working with a team of city engineers, architects, landscape architects and neighboring communities. The project is funded through the Phoenix Percent for Art Program.

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26. Kimsooja, FF Alumn, in Lofoten, Norway, thru September 7

Lofoten International Art Festival
June 14th, 2008 - September 7th, 2008

KIMSOOJA
The House Project (2008)
Bottari (2008)
Sewing into Walking: Kyungju (1994)

Kimsooja's new project is launched at the exhibition as a gesture towards the future, to what may become of a remote old house. The house has been left on its own, unused, beaten by the weather for dozens of years, like so many similar modest buildings around Lofoten. With The House Project, Kimsooja focuses our attention on the singular instead of the spectacular, in the landscape and its inhabitation, and invites us to imagine its potential.

At LIAF 08, nothing else is presented for the moment than the house as it is, as an object in itself. The long term plan, however, is to restore the house into a simple accommodation and studio space that allows for retreat, artistic work and meditation in isolation. Temporarily, this may offer visitors also an opportunity of focused contemplation of art works and processes, the place and its surrounding environment. The project aims, thus, to allow for continuity in both the artist's and LIAF's engagement with, and non-intrusive contribution, to the local environment.

Kimsooja will also present in the exhibition a previously unseen installation comprising of two works: a video Sewing into Walking: Kyungju, and a sculptural floor piece Bottari. In both of the works, traditional colourful Korean bedclothes take centre stage, as references to mobility (as transportable bundles of belongings), as well as suggestive of intimacy and privacy. The floor installation includes locally collected second-hand clothing as well, weaving the local into the global world of migration, and making space for associations of home that cross cultural boundaries.

~Taru Elfving, June 2008
Curator of LIAF 08, writer and curator based in London

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL:
Lofoten, an archipelago with a unique and fragile ecosystem, has inspired LIAF 08 to address the specificities and urgencies of this context. Our key aim is to create an event that involves the local inhabitants, visitors to the islands and the participating artists in a dialogue around the questions of sustainable future and expanded community.

The festival is now entering a new phase with an emphasis on site-specificity and commissioned work. We have commissioned artists to produce new pieces as well as invited them to show previous work. This allows for a closer insight into the practice of each artist as well as aims to weave more complex links between specific and global phenomena, here and elsewhere.

NEW PRODUCTIONS Some production processes of the new works happen within the exhibition, such as Jun Yang’s film production, Joshua Sofaer’s inventory of local collections, and Tomas Saraceno’s semi-scientific experiment. Platforma 9.81 makes a proposal for future, while Lara Almarcegui directs our attention to current transformations within the town. Marjetica Potrc’s project entwines the local traditions with global concerns around urban development, Elin Wikström engages the local inhabitants in an alternative service economy, while Katarina Zdjelar collaborates with a local choir. Yang Zhenzhong engages with the questions of printed word and pollution, while another work in public space by Lise Harlev traces the subtle line between private and public. Sami Rintala & Dagur Eggertsson’s project moves out of the town and creates space for engagement with the surroundings, while Kimsooja focuses our attention on the specific instead of the spectacular in the landscape and its inhabitation.

OTHER EXHIBITION PROGRAM The exhibition also encompasses screenings at the cinema in Svolvær (Artur Zmijewski), a video program of works placed in various sites around the Lofoten (Johanna Domke, Marianne Heske, Kristan Horton, Lisa Klapstock, Eva Meyer Keller, Vesa Ranta), and a performance program (incl. Baktruppen). Prior to and coinciding with the exhibition a series of workshops has been integral to the festival: a collaboration between artists Institutt for farge and local school pupils; a series of sound performances and workshops (Mad Professor, Marius Watz, Alexander Rishaug); and a workshop between Ramallah and Tromsø Art Academies led by artists Learning Site. This is all presented in our alternative guide, which is itself an art project - a collaboration of the artists collective Raketa with local high school pupils.

LIAF 08 is not formed around a theme but an ethos that guides and encourages the interactions that address Lofoten - as a complex environment in constant process.

You can find more about the Festival here:
Lofoten International Art Festival website

Kimsooja (Taegu Korea, 1957), lives and works in New York, since 1999. She studied at the Painting Department of Hong-Ik University & Graduate School in Seoul. Her numerous solo-exhibitions include Kimsooja at Magasin 3, Stockholm, Musèe d’art contemporaine de Lyon, Museum Kunst Palast, PAC Milan, P.S.1/MOMA, New York. In addition, she realized several site-specific projects, most recently at Crystal Palace, Museo Nacional Centro de Reina Sofia, Madrid; and Teatro la Fenice, in conjunction with a joint solo exhibition at Fondazione Bevilacqua la Masa.

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27. Raúl Zamudio, FF Alumn, in Yeosu, South Korea, Aug. 30-Sept. 20

Garden of Delights: 2008 Yeosu Art Festival
Artistic Director & Curator: Raúl Zamudio
August 30- September 20
Various venues,Yeosu, South Korea
Garden of Delights is an international exhibition that will take place in the city of Yeosu, South Korea and is part of the 2008 Yeosu Art Festival. The festival will consist of the international exhibition, a program of video and film, a one day event of public audio works played from a car equipped with bullhorn speakers that will make its was around the city, an outdoor sculpture park, performances, and an exhibition by local Yeosu artists. Garden of Delights will present over 50 artists from around the world including artists from greater South Korea as well as from the festival’s host city.
www.yeosuartfestival.blogspot.com

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28. Liliana Porter, FF Alumn, at Leo Fortuna Gallery, Hudson, NY, opening June 21

Liliana Porter: Levitating Rabbit
June 21 - August 17, 2008
Opening reception: Saturday, June 21st, 4-6 pm

Leo Fortuna Gallery
422 1/2 Warren Street
Hudson, NY 12534
T: 518.697.7907
F: 518.751.1292
www.leofortuna.com
gallery@leofortuna.com

Gallery Hours:
Open Friday - Sunday 11:00 am-5:00 pm, and by appointment.

Leo Fortuna Gallery
422 1/2 Warren St.
Hudson, NY 12534
T: 518.697.7907
F: 518.751.1292
www.leofortuna.com

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29. Rashaad Newsome, FF Alumn, at Location One, Manhattan, opening June 19, and more

Rashaad Newsome: Compositions
Have pop culture and globalization co-opted the wonderfully expressive gestures of the black America female? This is the question that Rashad Newsome explores in the video Shade Compositions (screen tests), one of two new works in an exhibition opening on Thursday June 19th at Location One.

In the second work, Untitled, Newsome brings choreography for the first time into his expressive repertoire. For this piece the artist invited one of New York’s top vogue dancers, Shayne Oliver, to his studio and recorded his demonstration. From the footage he created a choreographed piece in post-production by connecting different dance sequence. Shayne Oliver was then asked to practice and reinterpret this dance, and to perform it before a camera. The resulting video (8 min loop) will be shown in Location One’s Project Space, along with ten photographs of specific dance moves from the initial recording session.

"The language of the body has a vocabulary all its own," says Newsome, whose residency at Location One is sponsored by the Rockefeller Brothers Foundation. “Gestural language is often viewed as a cultural signifier, and I am interested in how it is formed, how it evolves as well as how it is appropriated across regional and class boundaries. I think of dance as a means of communication that for me can reflect a world bigger then the one I live in, one that can reflect many different people, many different cultures and many different times ."

Born in New Orleans, Newsome received a B.A. in Art History from Tulane University before studying at Film Video Arts in New York. He has been awarded several residencies including one at Entreprise Culturelle in Paris. Most recently his work has been shown at K.U.E.L., Berlin; Glassbox Gallery, Paris; Rush Arts Gallery, NYC; Fondation Cartier, Paris; The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans.
www.rashaadnewsome.com

In conjunction with the exhibition there will be a live performance of Shade Compositions (Location One) on Tuesday June 24th at 7 PM in Location One’s Performance Space (20 Greene Street). Four black females will perform a choreographed action piece, derived from dismissive gestures often characterized as "ghetto." The artist will utilize a hacked Nintendo Wii game controller to create a music and video composition in real-time, by recording, looping, composting and editing both audio and video simultaneously to the action of the performers.

This performance is sponsored by OAK www.oaknyc.com

Location One is a not-for-profit art center devoted to fostering new forms of creative expression and cultural exchange, and expanding the capabilities of our artists. We invite artists from different countries, working in a variety of mediums, to experiment with diverse means of expression/technology and engage with audiences through exhibitions and public programs.

For more information and digital images for publication please contact
Flavia Destefanis, flavia@location1.org, 212.334.3347

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30. Brody Condon, FF Alumn, in Arnhem, Holland, thru Sept. 21

VIRGIL DE VOLDERE GALLERY is proud to announce that Brody Condon will be participating in the Sonsbeek Festival 2008.

"Arnhem, Holland will host the 10th Sonsbeek International Sculpture Exhibition, entitled "Grandeur". Twenty-eight artists from around the world have been invited to visualize the aspiration for human greatness. This is an exhibition about the urge, the dream, the conflict and the struggles that are linked to this aspiration. The works of art show Grandeur on a human scale."

Condon's work will include a combination of video, sculpture and set design.

For more information: http://www.sonsbeek2008.nl

Sonsbeek Exhibition Dates:
June 13 - September 21
Procession: June 8
Official opening: June 13

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31. Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, FF Alumn, in The New York Times, June 15

June 15, 2008
Guiding Hands Help Immigrant Artists Connect
By TINA KELLEY

Something about the man in the banana costume appealed to Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga. Maybe it was the sign he wore that read, “A banana from my country can travel easier than me.” Maybe it was the fruit-wearer’s free-spiritedness as he paraded in his peel through public places. Or maybe it was the Latino roots they shared.

So when Mr. Zúñiga, 37, a graphic artist from Brooklyn who also works with new media, was looking through the portfolios of immigrant artists who were seeking mentors, he picked Hatuey Ramos-Fermín, 30, a conceptual artist from the Bronx who has made videos of himself playing Benito Banana, a character he created to reflect on migration.

The two have met at least 10 times, attending lectures and museum openings and discussing their work and the common themes within, like immigration and globalization. They are part of a mentoring program run by the New York Foundation for the Arts that helps artists from abroad gain a toehold in the city’s diverse arts community.

Mr. Zúñiga’s parents are from Nicaragua, and Mr. Ramos-Fermín was born in the Dominican Republic, raised in Puerto Rico and educated in the Netherlands.

Mr. Ramos-Fermín says that being an immigrant inspires him. “I really enjoy being in a place I’ve never been to before,” he said. “I see things differently than someone who has lived here all your life.”

Michael L. Royce, the executive director of the arts foundation, said the mentoring program began in 2007. It is an offshoot of the foundation’s New York Creates program that helps folk and craft artists, many of whom are immigrants and need to connect with established artists.

“The mentors know the galleries, what’s hot, what’s wanted, what can sell,” he said. “They can help the mentees become fully immersed in what it takes to be successful.”

The mentorship program, which this year has 15 pairs of mentors and mentees, costs about $100,000 to run, and is supported with grants from the Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation and the Independence Community Foundation. Mr. Royce said his foundation was seeking financing to expand the program, which does not inquire about the immigration status of the artists seeking mentors.

To get Mr. Ramos-Fermín closer to his dream of putting on a solo show and supporting himself through art, Mr. Zúñiga helped him with creating his Web site, www.hatmax.net, which recently netted Mr. Ramos-Fermín work with an Argentine magazine. Mr. Zúñiga also advised him on editing his artist’s statement.

“This idea of transmuting home, it needs developing further, in a separate paragraph,” Mr. Zúñiga told Mr. Ramos-Fermín as they sat in the Bronx Museum of the Arts last Wednesday working on the statement. He suggested adding spaces between the paragraphs, finding a better word for “utilizes” and switching an “of” with an “in.”

“That sounds better, that definitely sounds better,” Mr. Ramos-Fermín said.

The relationship has helped Mr. Zúñiga as well. He included Mr. Ramos-Fermín in his Web project, at www.votemos.us, which asks immigrants whom they would vote for in this year’s presidential election.

“We bounce around ideas,” Mr. Zúñiga said. “Anyone who has done a Master of Fine Arts will tell you what they miss most is the community and the studio visits.”

Mr. Zúñiga, who won a fellowship from the foundation for his work, chose the mentoring program as part of the community service requirement. “I was actively missing teaching,” he said.

Likewise, Ted Mathys, 29, a Brooklyn poet and fellowship winner who had a valuable relationship with a mentor while in college, said he was glad to become a mentor to Pinky Vincent, 30, a poet from Calcutta.

Ms. Vincent, who had worked as a journalist in India, came to the United States in 2002 with “$2,500 in traveler’s checks and the blessings of my parents.” While studying, working at a nonprofit organization and trying to send money home, she found it hard to continue with her poetry.

“She came to me with a small group of poems and wanted more than anything, in the beginning, confirmation, a set of eyes, a person who reads a lot of poetry to tell her if she was wasting her time,” Mr. Mathys said. “I put it all back in her court, to think of the role of poetry for her in her life.”

Their time together since has been quite fruitful, he said. “Her work is crisp. She has very strong images, and some of the subject matter she was writing about was really quite wonderful,” said Mr. Mathys, the author of two books of poetry. They fine-tuned Ms. Vincent’s poems, discussing where they might sound anachronistic to an American ear, and explored how to carve out time to write poetry while trying to make a living.

“To do writing, to be honest with you, seemed to me as a very, very selfish thing to do,” Ms. Vincent said. “I have to work. I have a lot of big dreams to follow in this country.”

The mentorship program helped her feel connected to other artists.

“I had the luxury of having that artist’s soul sort of come back, nurturing that a little bit more,” Ms. Vincent said. She and Mr. Mathys discussed giving readings, and she gained the confidence to do a reading in Manhattan that was sponsored by the South Asian Women’s Creative Collective. She read her own vivid lines, like these from “Calcutta”:

Inside the bus, body on body

Starched saris drenched in sweat

Talcum powder becomes dew drops on temples

Smudges necks like plaster of Paris

For poets, whose market is small and not particularly profitable, the help of a mentor can be crucial, Mr. Mathys said.

“If you’re not being trained in a formalized setting, if you’re not into an M.F.A. in poetry, or involved in workshops, you really can feel unmoored and alone in this kind of pursuit.”

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Goings On is compiled weekly by Harley Spiller


Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc.
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80 Hanson Place #301
Brooklyn NY 11217-1506 U.S.A.
Tel: 718-398-7255
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mail@franklinfurnace.org

Martha Wilson, Founding Director
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Harley Spiller, Administrator
Elise Kermani, Program Coordinator
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