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ABOUT GOINGS ON: How to subscribe and submit listings

CONTENTS:
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1. Erika Van Horn, FF Alumn, at Victoria & Albert Museum, London, England, April 1
2. Lynne Tillman, FF Alumn, new book release
3. Guillermo Gómez-Peña, FF Alumn, at NYU, April 22, 7-9 pm, and more
4. Vernita Nemec, FF Alumn, at Synagogue for the Arts, Manhattan, opening April 9, and more
5. Peter Downsbrough, FF Alumn, releases new video and book
6. Ilona Granet, FF Alumn, at New Harmony Contemporary Art Gallery, Indiana, thru April 22
7. William Scarbrough, FF Alumn, in Cape Town, South Africa, opening April 2
8. David Hammons, Lorraine O’Grady, Howardena Pindell, Adrian Piper, William Pope.L, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, March 30
9. Annie Sprinkle, FF Alumn, at UC Santa Cruz, CA, May 17
10. Tadashi Kawamata, FF Alumn, at Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Japan, thru April 13
11. Katya Grokhovsky, FF Intern, at CUE Art Foundation, Manhattan, April 5, and more
12. Laurie Anderson, Carl Andre, John Baldessari, John Cage, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Joan Jonas, Martin Kippenberger, Joseph Kosuth, Louise Lawler, Sol LeWitt, Robert Longo, Robert Mapplethorpe, Dennis Oppenheim, Adrian Piper, Cindy Sherman, at Bard College, Annandale, NY, opening April 13
13. LAPD, FF Alumns, in Paris, France, April
14. Warren Neidich, FF Alumn, at magnus muller Gallery, Berlin, Germany,
15. Annie Lanzillotto, FF Alumn, at the Brecht Forum, Manhattan, April 11, and more
16. Peter Grzybowski, FF Alumn, at Midway Theater, Boston, MA, April 4-5
17. SPACES, Cleveland, OH, seeks executive director
18. Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Lawrence Weiner, FF Alumns, at Castello di Rivoli, Turino, Italy, April 2, 2008-January 18, 2009
19. Tish Benson, FF Alumn, reviews Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane, FF Alumns
20. Dolores Zorreguieta, FF Alumn, at Cultural Center of Spain, Tegucigalpa, Honduras, opening April 9
21. Marie Sester, FF Alumn, in Ostersund, Sweden, April 2-August 31,
22. Brooke Toczylowski, FF Alumn, at Madarts Spring Show, Brooklyn, opening April 5
23. Alistair McCartney, Tim Miller, FF Alumns, announces new book
24. Ron Athey, FF Alumn, in Portland, OR, April 3, and more
25. Ame Gilbert, Audrey Kindred, Barbara Kirschenblatt-Gimblett, Annie Lanzillotto, Paul Lamarre and Melissa P. Wolf, Harley Spiller, Marvin Taylor, Martha Wilson, Simba Yangala, FF Alumn, at Umami Festival, Roulette, Manhattan, April 8-18
26. Dread Scott, FF Alumn, at MoCADA, Brooklyn, April 11, and more
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1. Erika Van Horn, FF Alumn, at Victoria & Albert Museum, London, England, April 1

Certain Trees: the Constructed Book, Poem and Object, 1964-2008
Victoria & Albert Museum, London
1 April-17 August 2008

This display of books, objects and constructions reveals an energetic community of poets and artists in Britain discovering and developing the expressive potential of publication as an art practice. Heirs to the Concrete Poetry movement of the 1960s, all acknowledge the vital influence of the internationally-recognised Scottish poet, artist and landscape-gardener Ian Hamilton Finlay (1925-2006). Their work is far from uniform, each moving the tradition on in an original way, but shared characteristics include brevity, a subtle sense of colour, wry humour, and an unpretentious relationship to art and literature of the past. Themes of landscape and locality are typically non-metropolitan and domestic. Some of the works look like quite ordinary books, but their use of mainstream conventions is purposeful, questioning or amused, while the modest poem-card becomes an artwork.

In 1964 the Tarasque Press was founded in Nottingham by Stuart Mills (1940-2006) and Simon Cutts, while Finlay's Wild Hawthorn Press, though founded earlier, now began publishing numerous booklets of his own poetry. The 1970s saw Cutts create Coracle Gallery and Press in South London, and the birth of the Moschatel Press partnership of Thomas A Clark and Laurie Clark (Nailsworth, Gloucestershire). In the 1980s Coracle functioned as a creative centre for artists, among them John Bevis and Colin Sackett, to develop their own projects, such as Chocolate News Books. American artist Erica Van Horn joined Coracle. New initiatives of the 1990s by associated artists included David Bellingham's imprint WAX366 (Glasgow) and Martin Rogers's Research Group for Artists' Publications (Derby).

The importance of the group to the 16 individuals represented here is both practical and inspirational: a matter of works produced in collaboration, of shared enterprises such as bookshops, galleries and magazines, and in some cases a call and response of allusions between works by different people. The selection emphasises the idea of 'construction', proposing an equivalence between 'making' in language and in art. A poem is a kind of object, and the material character of a book may be its most important message.

Admission free. For visiting information see: http://www.vam.ac.uk/

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2. Lynne Tillman, FF Alumn, new book release

Lynne Tillman, FF Alumn, has written the text for “Fantasies,” a new book of photographgs by Lisa Kereszi. Damiani Editore, 2008. Distributed Art Publishers.

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3. Guillermo Gómez-Peña, FF Alumn, at NYU, April 22, 7-9 pm, and more

The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics and el Museo del Barrio present two evenings featuring Guillermo Gómez-Peña. After more than four years away from the New York scene, Gómez-Peña brings back his unique style of performance-activism and “theatricalizations of postcolonial theory.” In his books, as in his solo shows, he pushes the boundaries still further, exploring what’s left for artists to do in a post-9/11 “repressive culture of censorship, paranoid nationalism” and what he terms “the mainstream bizarre.” These programs are presented in connection with El Museo’s current exhibition, Arte . Vida: Actions by Artists of the Americas, 1960-2000 and the Hemispheric Institute’s EMERGENYC program.

AN EVENING OF SPOKEN WORD ROULETTE AND CRITICAL THEORY WITH GUILLERMO GÓMEZ-PEÑA
Tuesday, April 22, 2008, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
New York University
Jurow Hall, Silver Center,
100 Washington Square East

Guillermo Gómez-Peña will present a lecture at New York university in which he will examine the role of artists working against the backdrop of war, censorship, cultural paranoia and spiritual despair. In his lecture, Gómez-Peña will ask: What are the new roles that artists must undertake? Where are the new borders between the accepted and the forbidden? Is art still a pertinent form of inquiry and contestation? This lecture will be the inaugural public event of the institute’s EMERGENYC and Hemispheric New York programs.

Admission: Free. For more information e-mail hemi.newyork@nyu.edu.

EL MEXORCIST 3: AMERICA’S MOST WANTED INNER DEMON
Wednesday, April 23, 2008, 6:30 – 8:30 pm
El Museo del Barrio
Teatro Heckscher, 1230 Fifth Avenue at 104th Street

In this performance, Gómez-Peña assaults the demonized construction of the US/Mexican border—a literal and symbolic zone lined with Minutemen, rising nativism, three-ply fences, globalization, and transnational identities. To this effect, the “border artist extraordinaire” uses acid Chicano humor, hybrid literary genres, multilingualism, and activist theory as subversive strategies. In this journey to the geographical and psychological outposts of Chicanismo, Gómez-Peña also reflects on identity, race, sexuality, pop culture, politics and the impact of new technologies in the post-9/11 era.

Admission: Free. For advance registration e-mail public_programs@elmuseo.org

These programs are made possible by The Rockefeller Brothers Fund, New York University, an Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award, the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Trust, the Altman Foundation, Time Warner, and The Wallace Foundation. Public programs are supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency.

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4. Vernita Nemec, FF Alumn, at Synagogue for the Arts, Manhattan, opening April 9, and more

I'M IN 3 GROUP SHOWS COMING UP SOON... HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE
BEST
VERNITA

Synagogue for the Arts
49 White Street
April 3 - May 22, Reception, April 9. 6:00 - 8:00 PM

Art gotham
(new location) 192 Ave of Americas @ Spring & Prince St
April 24 - April 28 Reception: Thursday, April 24. 6:00 PM

92St Y Tribeca
200 Hudson Street
April 18 - 30

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5. Peter Downsbrough, FF Alumn, releases new video and book

] AND HERE
Peter Downsbrough
2007, video, 24', b/w and colour, sound
] AND HERE is a video project filmed in North Kent's industrial and urban environment. It captures images from Kentish town centres to the container transport hub on the Isle of Grain, to the Isle of Sheppey's caravans. It was commissioned by The Faversham Society in response to the rapid changes brought about by The Thames Gateway North Kent Development, a major regeneration programme extending from Dartford in the north of the region to Teynham in the south. The Faversham Society is a voluntary organisation established in 1962 to protect and promote the heritage of the market town of Faversham and its surrounding areas in Kent. Somewhat different from Downsbrough's films (AS ] BACK, A]S, to name just a few, here the represented space is fully identifiable. This makes it theoretically possible to trace on a map the places Downsbrough visited with his camera. But above all it underlines an aspect of Downsbrough's work that consists of documenting lived material history: places still there – still 'on the go' - but going, disappearing as well. Other differences with (most of the) former projects concern the (minimal) use of colour and the length of this film. But the most important difference lies in the fact that for ] AND HERE specially commissioned improvised music is used, executed by Xavier Garcia Bardon and Benjamin Francart. Similar to the 'structuralist' images of Downsbrough's cinema, the music - positioning itself somewhere between 90s shoegaze, postrock and improvisation - has a strong emphasis on texture. If both video and music possess a certain 'frozen' quality, they are as if betrayed (tempered, complexified) by the very material side of the process of structuring ('ideally') a space or a soundscape. It is exactly this material side of Downsbrough's 'method' - 'real' matter turned 'video material', matter that is always historical, ever residual - which creates a tension in his videos, as well as the pleasure of watching them. The work of Peter Downsbrough (US, 1940) - sculpture, graphics, photography, video, film and books - began with an interest in architecture and articulates a complex relationship between architecture, language and typography. Only the bare essentials remain: form is reduced to lines, colours are mostly barred. In his videos, movement and language are explored in relation to time and space: they both represent and deconstruct modern urban and industrial architecture. At the same time, a linguistic twist takes place: by inserting and interposing word blocks like AND, AS or IN, Downsbrough tilts the videos to a kind of 'phrase' which simultaneously functions as a 'place' for the viewer to lodge in. Downsbrough has recently exhibited at the Paleis van Schone Kunsten/Palais des Beaux-Arts (Brussels), the SMAK(Ghent), the Museum Sztuki (Lodz), the FRAC Bourgogne, Dijon, Galerie Cent8, Paris and Galerie Erna Hecey, Brussels; his films and videos were screened at the Reina Sofia (Madrid), Argos (Brussels), Les Rencontres Internationales (Paris) and the Kunsthalle Bern.

] AND HERE 2007
Filmed by Peter Downsbrough
Edited by Peter Downsbrough and Aurélien Bambagioni
Music by Xavier Garcia Bardon and Benjamin Francart
Voices by Marie Thérèse Champesme and Karel Cusse-Downsbrough
Curator: Christine Gist
© Peter Downsbrough 2007

] AND HERE is an initiative of The Faversham Society supported by Land Securities LINK Fund and Kent County Council Local Schemes Grant.
] AND HERE is presented for the first time in the UK on Friday 28 March 2008, 18.30-20.30 at Trinity Resource Centre, Holy Trinity Church, High Street, Dartford, Kent DA1 1DE The screening will also launch Peter Downsbrough's book WITH ] IN - PLACE (88 pages, black/white and colour, soft cover, 22.5 x 16cm, with photographs and video stills). The book has received the support of Arts Council England, South East.
Information: tel +44 (0) 1304 372 414 c.gist@btinternet.com

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6. Ilona Granet, FF Alumn, at New Harmony Contemporary Art Gallery, Indiana, thru April 22

Ilona Granet
a mini retrospective at
New Harmony Contemporary Art Gallery
New Harmony, Indiana

Public Work Private Pillage
Bluer Pastures
March 27 - April 22

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7. William Scarbrough, FF Alumn, in Cape Town, South Africa, opening April 2

William Scarbrough, FF Alumn, presents
Stitches 2008
April 2-26, 2008
Bell-Roberts Contemporary Art Gallery
Cape Town, South Africa
For full information please visit www.bell-roberts.com

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8. David Hammons, Lorraine O’Grady, Howardena Pindell, Adrian Piper, William Pope.L, FF Alumns, in The New York Times, March 30

Below is the text (without illustrations_
from The New York Times
March 30, 2008
Art
The Topic Is Race; the Art Is Fearless
By HOLLAND COTTER
IN the 1970s the African-American artist Adrian Piper donned an Afro wig and a fake mustache and prowled the streets of various cities in the scowling, muttering guise of the Mythic Being, a performance-art version of a prevailing stereotype, the black male as a mugger, hustler, gangsta. In the photographs that resulted you can see what she was up to. In an era when some politicians and much of the popular press seemed to be stoking racial fear, she was turning fear into farce — but serious, and disturbing, farce, intended to punch a hole in pervasive fictions while acknowledging their power. Recently a new kind of Mythic Being arrived on the scene, the very opposite of the one Ms. Piper introduced some 30 years ago. He doesn’t mutter; he wears business suits; he smiles. He is by descent half black African, half white American. His name is Barack Obama.
On the rancorous subject of the country’s racial history he isn’t antagonistic; he speaks of reconciliation, of laying down arms, of moving on, of closure. He is presenting himself as a 21st-century postracial leader, with a vision of a color-blind, or color-embracing, world to come.

Campaigning politicians talk solutions; artists talk problems. Politics deals in goals and initiatives; art, or at least interesting art, in a language of doubt and nuance. This has always been true when the subject is race. And when it is, art is often ahead of the political news curve, and heading in a contrary direction. In a recent solo debut at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery in Chelsea a young artist named Rashid Johnson created a fictional secret society of African-American intellectuals, a cross between Mensa and the Masons. At first uplift seemed to be the theme. The installation was framed by a sculpture resembling giant cross hairs. Or was it a microscope lens, or a telescope’s? The interpretive choice was yours. So was the decision to stay or run. Here was art beyond old hot-button statements, steering clear of easy condemnations and endorsements. But are artists like Mr. Johnson making “black” art? Political art? Identity art? There are no answers, or at least no unambiguous ones.

Since Ms. Piper’s Mythical Being went stalking in the 1970s — a time when black militants and blaxploitation movies reveled in racial difference — artists have steadily challenged prevailing constructs about race. As multiculturalism entered mainstream institutions in the 1980s, the black conceptualist David Hammons stayed outdoors, selling snowballs on a downtown Manhattan sidewalk. And when, in the 1990s, Robert Colescott was selected as the first African-American to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, he brought paintings of figures with mismatched racial features and skin tones, political parables hard to parse.

At the turn of the present millennium, with the art market bubbling up and the vogue for identity politics on the wane, William Pope.L — the self-described “friendliest black artist in America” — belly-crawled his way up Broadway, the Great White Way, in a Superman outfit, and ate copies of The Wall Street Journal. Today, as Mr. Obama pitches the hugely attractive prospect of a postracial society, artists have, as usual, already been there, surveyed the terrain and sent back skeptical, though hope-tinged, reports. And you can read those reports in art all around New York this spring, in retrospective surveys like “Wack! Art and the Feminist Revolution” currently at the P.S 1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, in the up-to-the-minute sampler that is the 2008 Whitney Biennial, in gallery shows in Chelsea and beyond, and in the plethora of art fairs clinging like barnacles to the Armory Show on Pier 94 this weekend.

“Wack!” is a good place to trace a postracial impulse in art going back decades. Ms. Piper is one of the few African-American artists in the show, along with Howardena Pindell and Lorraine O’Grady. All three began their careers with abstract work, at one time the form of black art most acceptable to white institutions, but went on to address race aggressively.

In a 1980 performance video, “Free, White and 21,” Ms. Pindell wore whiteface to deliver a scathing rebuke of art-world racism. In the same year Ms. O’Grady introduced an alter ego named “Mlle Bourgeoise Noire” who, dressed in a beauty-queen gown sewn from white formal gloves, crashed museum openings to protest all-white shows. A few years later Ms. Piper, who is light skinned, began to selectively distribute a printed calling card at similar social events. It read:

Dear Friend,
I am black. I am sure you did not realize this when you made/laughed at/agreed with that racist remark. In the past I have attempted to alert white people to my racial identity in advance. Unfortunately, this invariably causes them to react to me as pushy, manipulative or socially inappropriate. Therefore, my policy is to assume that white people do not make these remarks, even when they believe there are not black people present, and to distribute this card when they do.
I regret any discomfort my presence is causing you, just as I am sure you regret the discomfort your racism is causing me.
Sincerely yours,
Adrian Margaret Smith Piper

Although these artists’ careers took dissimilar directions, in at least some of their work from the ’70s and ’80s they all approached race, whiteness as well as blackness, as a creative medium. Race is treated as a form of performance; an identity that could, within limits, be worn or put aside; and as a diagnostic tool to investigate social values and pathologies.

Ms. Piper’s take on race as a form of creative nonfiction has had a powerful influence on two generations of African-Americans who, like Mr. Obama, didn’t experience the civil rights movement firsthand, and who share a cosmopolitan attitude toward race. In 2001 that attitude found corner-turning expression in “Freestyle,” an exhibition organized at the Studio Museum in Harlem by its director, Thelma Golden.

When Ms. Golden and her friend the artist Glenn Ligon called the 28 young American artists “postblack,” it made news. It was a big moment. If she wasn’t the first to use the term, she was the first to apply it to a group of artists who, she wrote, were “adamant about not being labeled ‘black’ artists, though their work was steeped, in fact deeply interested, in redefining complex notions of blackness.”
The work ranged from mural-size images of police helicopters painted with hair pomade by Kori Newkirk, who lives in Los Angeles, to computer-assisted geometric abstract painting by the New York artist Louis Cameron. Mr, Newkirk’s work came with specific if indirect ethnic references; Mr. Cameron’s did not. Although “black” in the Studio Museum context, they would lose their racial associations in an ethnically neutral institution like the Museum of Modern Art.

Ethnically neutral? That’s just a code-term for white, the no-color, the everything-color. For whiteness is as much — or as little — a racial category as blackness, though it is rarely acknowledged as such wherever it is the dominant, default ethnicity. Whiteness is yet another part of the postracial story. Like blackness, it has become a complicated subject for art. And few have explored it more forcefully and intimately than Nayland Blake.

Mr. Blake, 48, is the child of a black father and a white mother. In various performance pieces since the 1990s he has dressed up as a giant rabbit, partly as a reference to Br’er Rabbit of Joel Chandler Harris’s Uncle Remus stories, a wily animal who speaks in Southern black dialect and who survives capture by moving fast and against expectations.
In 2001 Mr. Blake appeared in a video with another artist, AA Bronson. Each had his face slathered with cake frosting, chocolate in Mr. Blake’s case, vanilla in Mr. Bronson’s. When then two men exchanged a long kiss, the colors, and presumably the flavors, began to blend. Shared love, the implication was, dissolves distinctions between “black” and “white,” which, as racial categories, are cosmetic, superficial.

As categories they are also explosive. In 1984, when Mr. Hammons painted a poster of the Rev. Jesse Jackson as a blond, blue-eyed Caucasian and exhibited it outdoors in Washington, the piece was trashed by a group of African-American men. Mr, Hammons intended the portrait, “How Ya Like Me Now,” as a comment on the paltry white support for Mr. Jackson’s presidential bid that year. Those who attacked it assumed the image was intended as an insult to Mr. Jackson.

More recently, when Kara Walker cut out paper silhouettes of fantasy slave narratives, with characters — black and white alike — inflicting mutual violence, she attracted censure from some black artists. At least some of those objecting had personal roots in the civil rights years and an investment in art as a vehicle for racial pride, social protest and spiritual solace. Ms. Walker, whose work skirts any such overt commitments, was accused of pandering to a white art market with an appetite for images of black abjection. She was called, in effect, a sellout to her race.

In a television interview a few weeks ago, before he formed plans to deliver his speech on race, Mr. Obama defended his practice of backing off from discussion of race in his campaign. He said it was no longer a useful subject in the national dialogue; we’re over it, or should be.

But in fact it can be extremely useful. There is no question that his public profile has been enhanced by his Philadelphia address, even if the political fallout in terms of votes has yet to be gauged. Race can certainly be used to sell art too, and the results can be also be unpredictable. As with politics, timing is crucial. In 1992 the white artist team Pruitt-Early (Rob Pruitt and Walter Early) presented a gallery exhibition called “The Red Black Green Red White and Blue Project.” Its theme was the marketing of African-American pop culture, with an installation of black-power posters, dashiki cloth and tapes of soul music bought in Harlem. What might, at a later time or with different content, have been seen as a somewhat dated consumerist critique proved to be a public relations disaster. The artists were widely condemned as racist and all but disappeared from the art world.
Eight years later, with the cooling of identity politics, a show called “Hip-Hop Nation: Roots, Rhymes and Rage” arrived, with no apparent critical component, at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. An array of fashion images, videos and artifacts associated with stars like the Notorious B.I.G., Missy Elliott and Tupac Shakur, it was assumed to be a welcoming (if patronizing) gesture to the museum’s local African-American audience. Yet its appearance coincided with the general massive marketing of hip-hop culture to middle-class whites, a phenomenon that Mr. Pruitt and Mr. Early had been pointing to.
Were Pruitt-Early postblack artists ahead of their time, offering a new take on race, as a movable feast that collided with older, essentialist attitudes? If so, they would probably find plenty of company now in artists who stake out terrain both black and postblack, white and postwhite.

Mr. Pope.L (he who crawled up Broadway) does so with a posture of radical outsiderness that cancels bogus notions of racial or cultural essence. Basically he short-circuits the very concept of what an artist, black or white, “should” be. He smiles as he inches up the street on all fours; he uncomplainingly devours news of money he’ll never have. He paints murals with peanut butter and makes sculpture from Pop-Tarts, the stuff of welfare meals. In many ways his main subject would seem to be class, not race. Yet race is everywhere in his art.

He works with mostly white materials — mayonnaise, milk, flour — but he also runs the Black Factory, a mobile workshop-van equipped to transform any object, no matter what color, into a “black” object. How? By covering it with cheap black paint. For a retrospective at the Maine College of Art in Portland in 2003, Mr. Pope.L presented a performance piece with the optimistic title “eRacism,” but that was entirely about race-based conflict. In a photograph in the show’s catalog, he has the word written in white on his bare black chest. Were he pale-skinned, it might have been all but invisible.
Whereas Mr. Pope.L has shaped himself into a distinctive racial presence, certain other artists of color are literally built from scratch. A Miami artists collective called BLCK, in the current Whitney Biennial, doesn’t really exist. The archival materials attributed to it documenting African American life in the 1960s is actually the creation of single artist: Adler Guerrier, who was born in Haiti in 1975.

Projects by Edgar Arceneaux, who is also in the biennial, have included imaginary visual jam sessions with the jazz visionary Sun Ra and the late Conceptual artist Sol Lewitt. Earlier in this art season, a white artist, Joe Scanlan, had a solo gallery show using the fictional persona of a black artist, Donelle Woolford. Ms. Woolford was awarded at least one appreciative review, suggesting that, in art at least, race can be independent of DNA.
The topic of race and blood has always been an inflammatory one in this country. Ms. Piper broached it in a 1988 video installation and delivered some bad news. Facing us through the camera, speaking with the soothing composure of a social worker or grief counselor, she said that, according to statistics, if we were white Americans, chances were very high that we carried at least some black blood. That was the legacy of slavery. She knew we would be upset. She was sorry. But was the truth. The piece was titled “Cornered.”

And are we upset? I’ll speak for myself; it’s not a question. Of course not. Which is a good thing, because the concept of race in America — the fraught fictions of whiteness and blackness— is not going away soon. It is still deep in our system. Whether it is or isn’t in our blood, it’s in our laws, our behavior, our institutions, our sensibilities, our dreams. It’s also in our art, which, at its contrarian and ambiguous best, is always on the job, probing, resisting, questioning and traveling miles ahead down the road.

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9. Annie Sprinkle, FF Alumn, at UC Santa Cruz, CA, May 17

Annie Sprinkle and Elizabeth Stephen Exhibit
Their Love at the San Jose ICA

March 28, 2008, SAN JOSE, Calif – The San Jose ICA and artists Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle invite you to co-create their “Green Wedding #4” that will take place on May 17 at 2:30 at the Shakespeare Glen, UC Santa Cruz. The Love Art Laboratory Sewing Bee on April 5, from 2-4 p.m. at ICA gallery will allow an opportunity for visitors to contribute to their wedding production. Part bridal shower and part sewing bee, visitors can help sew the artists’ veils while sharing stories of love and relationships. In addition to these programs, the artists will display the costumes, ephemera and video documentation from their first three weddings as part of the exhibition, This Show Needs You.

Community participation is an essential part of the larger theme of This Show Needs You. The exhibition examines art as social exchange with workshops, installations, and performance art by 11 artists. Each piece is dependent on the willingness of audiences to co-author its production. This exhibition is also presented in conjunction with UCSC’s conference, Intervene! Interrupt! Rethinking Art as Social Practice from May 15-17.

Internationally known “post-porn” performance artist Annie Sprinkle and inter-media artist Elizabeth Stephens are the Love Art Laboratory. As collaborators and lovers, they are dedicated to exploring to love as art as a response to the violence of war, the intolerance of the anti-gay rights movement, and the excessive greed and fear in our culture. A seven-year project, now in its fourth year, the artists co-create a big performance art wedding with friends, families, artists and various communities each year.

For more information please visit:
www.sjica.org or contact Susan O’Malley at (408) 283-8155.

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10. Tadashi Kawamata, FF Alumn, at Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Japan, thru April 13

Tadashi Kawamata [Walkway]
9 February 2008 - 13 April 2008

Museum of Contemporary
Art Tokyo (MOT)
4-1-1, Miyoshi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0022 JAPAN
Tel: +81 (0)3 5245 4111
Fax: +81 (0)3 5124 1141
http://www.mot-art-museum.jp/english
The exhibition’s official site:
http://www.kawamata.mot-art-museum.jp

Viewers, through their own movement, produce an exhibition that never ends.
What do people look at, in what way?
If there were a wall, how would it affect the flow of people?
In a certain place, people collect, sit down, make discoveries. . . .

Tracing Kawamata’s journey of the past 30 years, from 1978 to 2008, we see that his career has been a continuing attempt to connect--and be a “walkway” --between art and the everyday.

To turn the art museum into a “walkway”--such will be the nature of Kawamata’s new project this time. A walkway is an intermediate territory or threshold, a detour between two places, or else a contact zone. The art museum--something usually perceived as a storehouse or display area. By perceiving it as a “walkway” on which people come and go, how will Kawamata alter its spaces, its functions?

With this keyword, “walkway,” as a lamp, viewers will survey the works he has created since his student days, including projects unfinished and yet to begin. As they come and go on this “walkway,” furthermore, they will observe people holding meetings, laboring, and engaging in dialogue, and may even find involvement in such activity. Tadashi Kawamata’s “Walkway” is the practice of reconstructing experiences related to everyday life. Working without beginning or end, he creates an autonomous place in order to work free from limitation by goals or norms.

The exhibition is curated by Fumihiko Sumitomo, SeniorCurator, MOT.

The concept book for this exhibition including photo documents of Kawamata’s projects, snapshot photos and sketches with surveyed biography and bibliography is published from Bijutsu
Shuppan-Sha, Ltd.

For further information please contact Reiko Noguchi, Press Office, Museum of Contemporary Art
Tokyo, Japan.

Email: r-noguchi@mot-art.jp Tel: +81 (0) 3-5245-1134 / Fax: +81 (0) 3-5245-1141,

Tadashi Kawamata [Walkway] was organized by: Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture – Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo
Under the patronage of : Embassy of France
In cooperation with: Hewlett-Packard Japan, Ltd.

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11. Katya Grokhovsky, FF Intern, at CUE Art Foundation, Manhattan, April 5, and more

Performances of Frontera: Original Version with English Subtitles
By Edwin Culp
Curated by CUE exhibiting Collective, Laboratorio 060
Performers: Katya Grokhovsky, Pun and Edwin Culp
Based on the principles of oral narration, this performance recuperates the experiences and works in the project Frontera: Sketch for the Creation of a Future Society by Laboratorio 060. Stories, actions and images developed from what happened there are combined with the performer's own life experience, producing a new way of approaching, re-presenting and documenting the artistic projects developed in Frontera Corozal, Mexico. Rather than presenting 'true facts' by using audiovisual techniques, the performer -who was not present at the actual project- takes the stories into their own body and memory, developing new images and anecdotes closer to their own experience. As a compliment to this work, a series of interviews is also screened: not with the artists that participated in the original project or with the curators, but with the performers who imagine and shape a town they have never been to and describe a series of pieces they have never seen or experienced.
Performance Dates:

Saturday, April 5, 3:00-4:00pm
Saturday, April 19, 3:00-400pm

Both performances will be performed by the artist, Katya Grokhovsky and are open to the public. No reservations are required.

Cost: FREE
CUE Art Foundation
511 West 25th Street
New York, New York 10001

And

EXISTENCIA
one night exhibition of performance art

Sunday 20th of April 2008, 6 to 9pm,

at Rififi - 332 East 11th Street

participating artists:

Ana MAria Delgado
Jennifer Dewalt
Thomas Gokey
Katya Grokhovsky
Jaclyn Meloche
Megan Prince
Polina Porras Sivolobova
Cole Wimpee

guest Dj Twig the Wonderkid

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12. Laurie Anderson, Carl Andre, John Baldessari, John Cage, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Joan Jonas, Martin Kippenberger, Joseph Kosuth, Louise Lawler, Sol LeWitt, Robert Longo, Robert Mapplethorpe, Dennis Oppenheim, Adrian Piper, Cindy Sherman, at Bard College, Annandale, NY, opening April 13

Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College

Spring Exhibitions in the CCS Galleries
April 13 – 27, 2008

Opening reception:
Sunday, April 13, 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Center for Curatorial Studies and
Hessel Museum of Art
Bard College, PO Box 5000
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-5000
845-758-7598
ccs@bard.edu
http://www.bard.edu/ccs

Another Time
Chen Chieh-jen, Tacita Dean, and Peter Hutton
The three films in Another Time are poetic visions of disappearing technology and industries. By slowing down the viewer's experience of time, the films encourage reflection on the personal and collective loss connected to notions of linear history, progress, technological advancement and global economies.
Curated by Milena Hoegsberg

(loverboy), sleep, shatter, handheld bird
Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Rodney Graham, Barry Le Va, and Charles Ray
Four works by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Rodney Graham, Barry Le Va, and Charles Ray are brought together based on a series of affective relationships, emphasizing a central concern of both the art on view and the exhibition’s organizing premise: the charged space of encounter between materials, objects, bodies, or experiences, and the new meanings that come from their meeting.
Curated by Daniel Byers

Under the Influence
John Baldessari, Jen DeNike, Nancy Holt, Tim Jackson, Joan Jonas, David Jones, Jill Magid, Rachel Mason, Michele O’Marah, and Robert Smithson
In every relationship—be it lover, student, teacher, friend, colleague—there exists a tension, a psychological push-pull, a subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) tug-of-war between dominance and submission. These frictions can surface under stress, but also amidst seemingly playful moments. Under the Influence considers what happens when this aspect of life enters the art-making process. Opening day performances by: Rachel Mason, snowboots, and Arctic Circle.
Curated by Anat Ebgi

Museum Hours:
Wednesday – Sunday, 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

Free transportation is available on a chartered bus that leaves from New York City for the opening reception. The bus returns to New York after the opening. For reservations, call 845.758.7598 or write ccs@bard.edu

For more information, call CCS Bard at 845.758.7598, write ccs@bard.edu , or visit http://www.bard.edu/ccs

Also on view: Second Thoughts
Hessel Museum of Art, March 16 – May 25

Second Thoughts presents exhibition as revision. Curated by 14 graduate students at the Center for Curatorial Studies, it is a direct response to Exhibitionism (October 20, 2007 – February 3, 2008), a series of autonomous and idiosyncratic micro-exhibitions that were curated by Matthew Higgs for each of the 16 galleries in the Hessel Museum of Art. By engaging amplification, erasure, extension, and redress, Second Thoughts seeks to alter the strategies utilized by Higgs in Exhibitionism to progressively revise the
entire exhibition.

French artist Marcelline Delbecq (b. 1977) contributes a new work for Second Thoughts that will interact with the preceding exhibition, Exhibitionism, thus incorporating the history of the site into the structure of her work. Additionally, New York–based artist Jaime Isenstein (b. 1975)—whose video work was recently brought into the Hessel Collection—will present a durational performance in the Museum (April 13, 1:00–4:00 p.m.) where she transforms herself into the arms and legs of a wingback chair.

Artists: Rita Ackermann, David Altmejd, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Laurie Anderson, Carl Andre, John Baldessari, Bernd & Hilla Becher, Robert Beck, John Bock, Alighiero e Boetti, Cosima von Bonin, Jonathan Borofsky, David Bunn, Gary Burnley, Scott Burton, John Cage, Paul Chan, Cecelia Condit, John Currin, Marcelline Delbecq, Donna Dennis, Carroll Dunham, Valie Export, Fischli and Weiss, Saul Fletcher, Isa Genzken, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Nancy Graves, Philip Guston, Rachel Harrison, Rachel Harrison, Matthew Higgs, Gary Hill, , Thomas Hirschhorn, Desiree Holman, Jamie Isenstein, Valerie Jaudon, Donald Judd, Martin Kippenberger, W. Imi Knoebel, Christopher Knowles, Joseph Kosuth, Robert Kushner, Carter Kustera, Sean Landers, Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt, Louise Lawler, Sol LeWitt, Ardele Lister, Robert Longo, Kim MacConnel, Robert Mangold, Robert Mapplethorpe, Virgil Marti, Martina Mullaney, Allan McCollum, Shana Moulton, Dennis Oppenheim, Gabriel Orozco, Blinky Palermo, Jorge Pardo , A. R. Penck, Adrian Piper, Seth Price, Robin Rhode, Tom Roda, Peter Saul, Ilene Segalove, Cindy Sherman, Ned Smyth, Rosemarie Trockel, Nicola Tyson, Kelley Walker, Joe Zucker

Curators: Mireille Bourgeois, Summer Guthery, Anaïs Lellouche, Christina Linden, Katerina Llanes, Gene McHugh, Fionn Meade, Kate Menconeri, Zeynep Öz, Marion Ritter, Bartholomew Ryan, Hajnalka Somogyi, Wendy Vogel, and Jess Wilcox

These exhibitions were made possible with support from the Rebecca and Martin Eisenberg Student Exhibition Fund, Mitzi and Warren Eisenberg, and the Patrons, Supporters and Friends of the Center for Curatorial Studies. Additional support provided by the Monique Beudert Award and the French Embassy in the US. Special thanks to the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.

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13. LAPD, FF Alumns, in Paris, France, April

Just in case you DID want to come to the show:

performances:
dinsdag /Tuesday + donderdag/Thursday : 19.30
woensdag/wednesady + vrijdag/Friday + zaterdag/Saturday : 20.30
zondag/Sunday : 15.00

Performed in French (mostly French though), English and Japanese by with 4 LAPD and 40 people from Gennevilliers with the movie. The performance last 2 hours, free seating, full price 22 euro.

here are some cheap hotels near the theatre:
ADRESSES HOTEL

HOTEL ETAP Gennevilliers
2 avenue Laurent Cely
08 92 68 32 29

48 € par jour

HOTEL IBIS BERTHIER
163 BIS AVENUE CLICHY 75017 PARIS
01 40 25 20 00

DU LUNDI AU VENDREDI 65€
DU LUNDI AU JEUDI 95€

Ciao amigos,
Henriette

www.lapovertydept.org

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14. Warren Neidich, FF Alumn, at magnus muller Gallery, Berlin, Germany,

magnus muller Gallery is pleased to announce the exhibition of Berlin-based American artist Warren Neidich entitled "Each Rainbow Must Retain the Chromatic Signature, it…". For the past 15 years Warren Neidich has used a variety of artistic means to explore the developmental and cultural foundations of perception, consciousness and the mind. The gallery will present three projects which utilize three different approaches, painting, installation and sculpture, to investigate the experiential variability of color perception.

Rainbow Brushes, 2007-08, consists of a series of thirteen and fifteen-inch paintbrushes that have been made through an action the artist refers to as "Performative Pulls". The colors found in a section of a rainbow that appears in an already existing painting in the history of European Art are first matched on paper with acrylic paint. For instance, the work entitled After Peter Paul Rubens, 1636, was made from the rainbow found in Ruben's painting Rainbow Landscape, 1636-1638. The paper is laid flat on the ground and a brush is pulled through it, leaving its traces or afterimage on the bristles. The brush is then hung on the wall. According to the science of optics, a rainbow is a physical phenomenon made up of seven colors arranged in a specific order. However, painted rainbows from different periods in art history appear quite different as they express the varying cultural and experiential circumstances under which they were created. These same changing conditions are reflected in the construction of the mind of the artist. Therefore, the representation of each rainbow is the result of the projection of this mind upon the canvas, which acts as a screen illuminated by that particular condition of the mind. The installation of these brushes highlights these differences and expresses the history and cumulative affects of cultural history on the mind as represented through the optics of art history.

Neidich's close relationship to Los Angeles and his interest in the works of the California Light and Space artists like James Turrell, Robert Irwin and Maria Nordman served as the inspiration for the large sculpture installed in the front of the gallery. Infinite Regress, 2008, is a three-sided pavilion, each side consisting of a 3m x 2,8m steel frame upon which ready-made automatic transparent glass sliding doors, like those found at airports and department stores, have been attached. Each door is tinted in one of the primary colors red, blue and yellow. The doors' opening and closing is activated through the passing motion of visitors in the gallery whose presence stimulates an invisible eye in this case an infrared sensor. Visitors as actors are also encouraged to move into and through it. Their actions and secret relations with the "work itself" endlessly EXCITE the superimposition of the transparent colored door surfaces upon each other, producing the secondary mixtures of violet, green, and orange. As a social conduit, the pavilion is embedded in the tectonics of the gallery, situating itself at the juncture of its three adjoining spaces. This relational and performative work is primarily the result of random gestures and circulatory patterns of the visitors inhabiting the gallery. Yet there is always the possibility that these same visitors might form temporary alliances with each other to create a variety of emergent colored effects and affects.

Red, White and Blue, 2000-2008, is an installation shown in the back room of the gallery made up of three one-meter square neon paintings and a wall of mirrors reflecting them. In False Start, 1959, Jasper Johns painted words in colors different from the colors named. Orange is painted in white and red is in blue. The object nature of the words is enhanced, rendering them almost unintelligible. The first part of Red, White, Blue consists of three painted canvases on which neon words spelling out the three colors of the American flag are attached but here, too, the colors are not consistent with their names. The neon for red consists of white letters and that of blue appears in red letters. This lack of correspondence is also found in a psychological test for attention called the Stroop Test, which takes advantage of our ability to read words more quickly and automatically than we can name colors. It measures a cognitive mechanism called directed attention. A poorer performance is found in individuals with attention deficit disorder but degrees of difficulty are also uncovered in normal people. The chromatic experiments using colored squares in the paintings of Joseph Albers, for instance Homage to the Square, 1965 are well known. But can experimental art works such as these go beyond the psychological and physiological conditions they stimulate? Surely they are imbedded in a history of art to which they communicate, but can they have biopolitical import. Red, White and Blue, 2000-2008 attempts to answer this question by engaging the body in a political way and drawing awareness to the way attention can be manipulated and information made confounding.

Warren Neidich has participated in numerous exhibitions worldwide and his work is represented in private and public collections, including the Whitney Museum of Art in New York, the Los Angeles County Museum in Los Angeles and the Ludwig Museum in Cologne. His work will be presented in a solo show at the Moderna Museet, Stockholm in the fall of 2008. In the past his work has been shown internationally in such institutions as the Whitney Museum of Art, New York City; P.S.1, MOMA, Long Island City, Ludwig Museum, Cologne; the Walker Art Museum, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Kunsthaus Graz, Kunsthaus Zurich, and ICA London. A collection of his writing Blow-up: Photography, Cinema and the Brain was published by DAP in 2003. He is the recipient of the AHRB-ACE Art Award, 2004, The Arts Council of England Merit Award, 2005 and The British Academy Award, 2005. He is currently the Visiting Artist and Research Fellow at the Center for Cognition, Computation and Culture at Goldsmiths College, London (2006-2008).

For additional information please contact Sönke Magnus Müller or Constanze Korb at the gallery.

magnus muller
Weydinger Strasse 10/12
D-10178 Berlin

Tel. +49-30-390320-40
Fax. +49-30-390320-44

mailto: office@magnusmuller.com
www.magnusmuller.com <http://www.magnusmuller.com>

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15. Annie Lanzillotto, FF Alumn, at the Brecht Forum, Manhattan, April 11, and more

Cittadini,

Here are two great events. Remember Invitations are not Obligations. I invite you with love, and so you know what is going on...

-- I am reading from a new publication April 11th, and I am mounting a performance installation dealing with my obsession with pushcart peddlers on April 14th and 15th.

Thank you for your constant love, support, and being there

Annie

April 11: I'm reading from "Wallid Walla Bint," (boy or girl) memoir essay about my time in Egypt studying tropical disease and cross-dressing as Abdul, while finding Allah.

Friday, April 11th
7:30 p.m.
Free
The Brecht Forum
451 West Street (between Bank + Bethune)
New York City

www.brechtforum.org
on "Manhattan's Left Bank" at 451 West Street (that's the West Side Highway) between Bank & Bethune Streets

This reading is a Launch for:
The International Journal of Feminist Politics
Volume 9 Issue 4 2007
Politics of Water: A Confluence of Women's Voices
Guest Editors Paola Corso and Nandita Ghosh
ISSN: 1468-4470 (electronic) 1461-6742 (paper)
Publisher: Routledge <http://www.informaworld.com/rout> Press Taylor &
Francis Group, tf.enquiries@informa.com or
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/spissue/RFJP-si.asp to order copies

"This special issue on women and the politics of water is a response to a
growing concern for the unequal access men and women have to water in an
increasingly fragile physical environment. As per the United Nations policy
brief on gender and water, although women have primary responsibility for
managing domestic water supply, sanitation and health, their central role in
water management is overlooked."
-Excerpt from "Women and the Politics of Water: An Introduction" by Nandita
Ghosh

"Consumers International (CI), which represents consumer organizations in
115 countries, officially made the link between women and water on
International Women's Day in 2004 when it announced that water is a consumer
right and that women are in the forefront of needing and securing that
right. This special issue is an expression of our deep admiration for women
all around the world who are putting their bodies and their lives on the
line for water."
-Excerpt from creative introductory essay "Confluence" by Paola Corso

and

EGGS and BELLS: a video meditation on my grandmother breaking eggs by slamming one into the other

available on YouTube. at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbQ3yMsNceU

Enjoy!

And

Monday April 14th, 7:00
Tuesday April 15th, 8:00

$22 (includes a 4:00 panel from the "Experimental Cuisine Collective" if the tkt is too steep, come help with the show)
Roulette
20 Greene Street (between Grand and Canal)
UMAMI Festival for Food and Performance www.umamifestival.com
Gastronomic Interactive Installations

I am performing my pushcart peddler solo. I'm calling this performance "Rule 23" which centers around my anger at La Guardia's RULE 23: No hawking and squawking!!!
(So, come Hawk and Squawk)
I have guest artists and scholars who've promised to be around me and take on pushcart peddling performance: Fawzia Abdel Khan (hosting Pushcart Peddler Karaoke), Salley May (Spirit of the Lower East Side), Jenny Bass (Viva Broccoli Rabe Saute) , Suzanne Wasserman (Pushcart Peddler History) , Nancy Ralph (New York Food Museum Display), Jules Gimbrone (Music), Josh Fausty (Cosa Mangia Oggi ! Temple) , Simba Yangala (pushcart peddler dance), Audrey Kindred (garlic skin masks)
Come hang out
The evening will also show films, and the ice cream offerings of Miwa Koizumi

**first annual UMAMI festival, curated by Yael Raviv, with Ame Gilbert. Check out the website to see the whole festival program.
Happy crocuses and daffodils busting through and radiating

Annie
forse sogniamo quasi abbastanza....perhaps we dream nearly enough
www.annielanzillotto.com

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16. Peter Grzybowski, FF Alumn, at Midway Theater, Boston, MA, April 4-5

PETER GRZYBOWSKI

Performance in Boston
Saturday, April 5, 2008, 7 PM

Contaminate 3 Festival
April 4-5, 2008

Midway Theater
15 Channel Center Street
Boston, MA 02132
(617) 542 7416

http://contaminate-festival.testperformance.org/

http://grzybowski.org

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17. SPACES, Cleveland, OH, seeks executive director

Executive Director – SPACES, a leading, national alternative gallery located in Cleveland seeks an experienced arts professional to guide its mission. An artist-centered organization since 1978, SPACES has presented work by over 9,000 artists to an audience of over 850,000. Executive Director provides creative direction and maintains curatorial process integrity; works with Board to maintain organizational sustainability; manages staff, fundraising, budgeting, planning; serves as liaison to artists, funders, and constituents. Bachelor’s degree (equivalent experience considered); Master's degree preferred. Ideal candidate demonstrates passion for and knowledge of alternative art, proven leadership and management success; is creative; open to change and willing to take risks. Salary commensurate with experience. Equal Opportunity Employer. Visit www.spacesgallery.org for a more detailed position description. Submit resume, cover letter, salary requirements, three references in 8.5 x 11; PDF format by April 25th to: jschutte@processcreative.com or Search Chair, Process Creative Studios, 1956 W. 25th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 44113. If submitting by email, please place “SPACES – Executive Director” in the subject line.

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18. Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Lawrence Weiner, FF Alumns, at Castello di Rivoli, Turino, Italy, April 2, 2008-January 18, 2009

Castello di Rivoli

A Room of One’s Own
April 2, 2008 - January 18, 2009

Press preview:
Monday, March 31, 2008 - 11:30 a.m.

Curated by Marcella Beccaria

http://www.castellodirivoli.org
A Room of One’s Own, a group show curated by Marcella Beccaria and inspired by the title of the homonymous essay by Virginia Woolf, explores the theme of solitude, analyzing its importance in the creative realm. Focusing on this theme, the exhibition brings together about twenty artists of international stature and includes forty works and large installations, dated from the Sixties to the present. Some pieces have been created specifically for this occasion; others are being shown for the first time, and most of them belong to the Castello’s collection, thanks to Fondazione CRT’s Project for Modern and Contemporary Art.

“The exhibition -- Marcella Beccaria writes -- explores the positive value of solitude, both as a condition tied to the secret moment of artistic inspiration, and as an unrepeatable moment of private encounter between the work and the observer. Immersing viewers in spaces capable of stimulating various senses, the works in the show refer to the conditions sought by each artist to nurture his or her creativity, and to an intention to seek direct contact with each visitor.”

Artists: Franz Ackermann, Stefano Arienti, Massimo Bartolini, Alan Charlton, Jan Dibbets, Olafur Eliasson, Marisa Merz, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Giulio Paolini, Giuseppe Penone, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Paola Pivi, Pipilotti Rist, Ettore Spalletti, Marijke van Warmerdam, Francesco Vezzoli, Lawrence Weiner.

The exhibition has been made possible with the support of Fondazione CRT

For information
Press Office, Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, tel. +39/011.9565209 - 211, fax +39/ 011.9565231
e-mail: press@castellodirivoli.org , s.bertalot@castellodirivoli.org
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19. Tish Benson, FF Alumn, reviews Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane, FF Alumns

turah cadillac (aka: tish benson)
artist residency in houston texas
"the contemplation of hoodoo art"

hey yall
i wrote this after going to see bill t jones/arne zane dance company this weekend at jones hall performance space in Houston Texas. If ya can please go to see something done by this brilliant man. His work speaks from the place words alone cannot reach.

blessings
t-

SOMETHING SO NECESSARY I CALL IT HOODOO ART

last night i saw one of'um them spirits gave the big load to carry bill t jones his art his art his art his art...
weighed and measured in movements given to those who have joined his troupe of ambidextrous interpreters of the show nuff color coated garblers shakin up salt they bend their bodies till time stands still rewinds to the place where art took the crash route a father who kills his daughter for her breath to carry her own words a psychotic rampager doin another kind of family intervention rust colored headline news given the healing oils by this shamanic circle

medicine torsos twistin the deformed puzzlers riddle doin whatever it takes to get at the holy tip
liftin dark magic gone awry see some shine
yeah
through the art of dance they spoke about the killin' spirit not in glorifying misspent energy but to recognize it as a source of power and might a place where the soul travels to know the worth of life has value is necessary as art as art as art as song as story as movement as song as story as movement

After they tamed the roar after the audience had been filled with the rise up bill t jones gave even more he opened up the floor to the audience yes!
i have finally found my hoodoo beggin' room i know if he don't hear me full ways at least i did my very best yes! i do have a question the scribe gives nothing until ink flows to the paper- i must write it first cause if i don't out pops the gibberish heart thumpin babbler dancin' the winged doll tourettes tongue jumpin up makin soup splash through the roof the audience would laugh as i hunt for the strange vocabulary that just flew out my mouth which will make all of me work up a sweat sure to be some news story about a river over flowin in a town called yak "mr. jones-where do u think the energy that your work exudes would go if you were not placing it- containing it in the dance the movements and the story?"
"thats a great question- i don't know I think i would go mad..."

his voice his truth echos past this showcase

pleasure is an odd bird-to find the place where the hereafter speaks the sky torn in two can soothe the wildest woodworkers -to have discovered the art of the arts -to know and see and hear'um speak the big winds- say to me "chile u think we really came here and picked cotton for hundreds and hundreds of years and not know who runs nature-umph umph umph...tell our stories daughta tell our stories"

between the cacaphony of dance and exploding music i kept rubbing my beaded bracelet saying to them hoodoo ridin' me urging me to hurry and get the loot to do their stories-i say: well yall there it is instead of takin yaselves cross this cotton and flower field nation...out body jumpin fire startin plane crashin where i can see ya! there it is! mr. bill t jones done figured out how to make it work so gowan bother him! ok fine hollywood wanna keep ya in the unknown slave catagory but here this fellow carryin' hoodoo good- obviously his juice is the true shine-gowan now follow him!

of course as usual when i get my hoodoo chant goin strong all they say
is:
SCENICVILLE TEXAS SCENICVILLE TEXAS SCENICVILLE TEXAS its the only way daughta its our song its our story its our place to let freedom ring - we came here cause we wanted to we came knowin ain't nobody told our stories daughta aint nobody told our stories cause we gave'um to u to tell'um until then we ride the winds we body jump we make art daughta we make art...

turah cadillac (aka:tish benson)
hoodoo goddess, scenicville texas mythologist, performance artist and hollywood muse currently is working extremely hard to get her Scenicville Texas folks attached to a good director to do them spirits right-make movies so they can calm down body jumpin and plane crashin and fire startin'

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20. Dolores Zorreguieta, FF Alumn, at Cultural Center of Spain, Tegucigalpa, Honduras, opening April 9

Dolores Zorreguieta, FF Alumn, at the Artists' Books Exhibition organized by the Cultural Center of Spain of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

The Cultural Center of Spain in Tegucigalpa will show books created by artists from Latin America selected by curator Mariaugusta Vintimilla.

Opening April 9 2008, 6:30PM

Mariaugusta Vintimilla will give a lecture about Artists' Books on May 10 at 6:30PM at the Cultural Center of Spain.

Centro Cultural de España
Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Tuesdays to Saturdays from 10AM to 8PM
Sundays, 9AM to 3PM

TE: 504 238 2013
Fax: 504 238 5332
info-ccet@aecihonduras.hn

Dolores Zorreguieta
http://www.sheisanartist.com

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21. Marie Sester, FF Alumn, in Ostersund, Sweden, April 2-August 31,

News for friends and colleagues,

Selected large-scale prints from L'Architecture du Paradis (2000) will be exhibited in the inaugural show Teleport Färfabriken at Färgfabriken Norr in Östersund, Sweden, April 2 - August 31, 2008.

Färfabriken Norr is the new second permanent exhibition space of Stockholm's well-known Färgfabriken. This grand opening exhibition features more than 80 international artists.

The exhibited large-scale prints are surveillance representations from L'Architecture du Paradis (2000), an immersive projection-based installation consisting of images of X-rayed vehicles juxtaposed with architecture.

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22. Brooke Toczylowski, FF Alumn, at Madarts Spring Show, Brooklyn, opening April 5

Come see my new work, it's racy.

Madarts Spring Show
Opening Reception: THIS SATURDAY, April 5th, 8 PM - 1 AM Exhibit goes from April 5th to April 20th Gallery Hours are Sat & Sun 12-6 and Thurs 6-9

255 18th St. (btw. 5th and 6th Ave) Brooklyn Take the R to Prospect Ave and walk UP.

Besitos,
Brooke

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23. Alistair McCartney, Tim Miller, FF Alumns, announces new book

from TIM MILLER- my partner ALISTAIR McCARTNEY and his NEW BOOK!

“If I’ve read a more deeply impressive, beautiful, sweeping, mindful, and innovative first novel than Alistair McCartney’s The End of the World Book, I have no memory of it. McCartney is a writer of peerless, brilliant originality and pure, giant talent.”
—Dennis Cooper, author of The Sluts and God Jr.

Hi Folks!

My partner Alistair and I are TOTALLY excited about his novel THE END OF THE WORLD BOOK which is just out from University of Wisconsin Press!
Check out the great video trailer for his book on Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waApf0KHBuc
The book is a funny and kinky and powerful novel told in encylopedia form from A-Z! Check it out! See the big story on Alistair in the current Advocate.
Buy a copy on Amazon!
http://www.amazon.com/End-World-Book-Novel/dp/0299226301/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1206720356&sr=8-1

Here's the cover and blurbs for Alistair's book THE END OF THE WORLD BOOK
http://alistairmccartney.blogspot.com/

cheers, Tim Miller

ALISTAIR McCARTNEY - THE END OF THE WORLD BOOK
http://alistairmccartney.blogspot.com/

Alistair McCartney is the author of THE END OF THE WORLD BOOK to be published in April 2008 by University of Wisconson Press. This is no ordinary novel. An encyclopedia of memory—from A to Z—The End of the World Book deftly intertwines fiction, memoir, and cultural history. Born in Perth, Western Australia, in 1971, his writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Fence, Bloom, James White Review, and other literary journals, as well as in a number of fiction and creative nonfiction anthologies, including Wonderlands: Good Gay Travel Writing (University of Wisconsin Press) and Between Men (Carroll and Graf.) He lives in Los Angeles with his partner Tim Miller and teaches creative writing and literature in the BA Program at Antioch University Los Angeles and Antioch Santa Barbara.

The End of the World Book
A Novel by
Alistair McCartney

This is no ordinary novel. An encyclopedia of memory—from A to Z—The End of the World Book deftly intertwines fiction, memoir, and cultural history, reimagining the story of the world and one man’s life as they both hurtle toward a frightening future. Alistair McCartney’s alphabetical guide to the apocalypse layers images like a prose poem, building from Aristotle to da Vinci, hip-hop to lederhosen, plagues to zippers, while barreling from antiquity to the present.

In this profound book about mortality, McCartney composes an irreverent archive of philosophical obsessions and homoerotic fixations, demonstrating the difficulty of separating what is real from what is imagined.

“If I’ve read a more deeply impressive, beautiful, sweeping, mindful, and innovative first novel than Alistair McCartney’s The End of the World Book, I have no memory of it. McCartney is a writer of peerless, brilliant originality and pure, giant talent.”
—Dennis Cooper, author of The Sluts and God Jr.

“The End of the World Book is in turn informative, playful, erotic, imaginary, witty, perverse, charming, autobiographical, and full of wonders; the letter K, for example, begins with Kafka and ends with Freddie Krueger. If the world is ending soon, I recommend you read it while there’s still time.”
—Jim Krusoe, author of Iceland and Blood Lake

“Beguiling, comical, earnest, and wise beyond its author’s years. Crossing sporadic bursts of linear narrative with a detailed taxonomy of altercation, McCartney has engineered a compelling compendium of integrated distractions, somewhat in the manner of Robert Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy. Read it from A to Z. He knows who you are: you will be quizzed.”
—James McCourt, author of Mawrdew Czgowchwz and Queer Street

www.hometown.aol.com/meaningme

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24. Ron Athey, FF Alumn, in Portland, OR, April 3, and more

April: Athey in Portland (3rd), Vancouver (6th), and Donau Festival, Austria (26th & 30th)

http://www.donaufestival.at/content-1/festival/program/08/ron-athey-dominic-johnson

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25. Ame Gilbert, Audrey Kindred, Barbara Kirschenblatt-Gimblett, Annie Lanzillotto, Paul Lamarre and Melissa P. Wolf, Harley Spiller, Marvin Taylor, Martha Wilson, Simba Yangala, FF Alumn, at Umami Festival, Roulette, Manhattan, April 8-18

For complete details on this food and art festival please visit www.umamifestival.com or call 917-720-5706. Thank you.

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26. Dread Scott, FF Alumn, at MoCADA, Brooklyn, April 11, and more

Friends,

a) On April 11, I will be giving another artist talk about my show at MoCADA. Revolution Books ( http://www.revolutionbooksnyc.org/ ) and MoCADA ( http://mocada.org/ ) are co-hosting this evening. For those that missed the first one, 150 people came and the dialog after my presentation was amazing. This will be another chance to hear me talk about the work in “Dread Scott: Welcome to America”

MoCADA (Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art)
Friday, April 11, 2008 6:30 pm
80 Hanson Place: the corner of South Portland and Hanson in downtown Brooklyn. Trains: 2 3 4 5 B Q at Atlantic Avenue / D M N R at Pacific Avenue / C at Lafayette / G at Fulton
Please RSVP to info@mocada.org or 718-230-0492

b) AlterNet.org posted a statement from me on controversy surrounding the show. It’s currently on the front page (woo hoo!). The direct link to the article is:
http://www.alternet.org/mediaculture/80640/

c) More favorable coverage of the show is starting to be written. Revolution Newspaper has a good short article:
http://www.revcom.us/a/124/check-it-dread-scott-en.html
There are no reviews yet. If you have ideas of a particular critic who you think would like the show and might write about it, please let me know.

d) Thank you to all of you that have come to the show. I really appreciate it and the museum is pleased that they have support. Thanks also to those who have spread the word. If you haven’t seen it yet, I hope you’ll drop by soon. The show rocks. You won’t be disappointed.

Best,

Dread
w: http://dreadscott.net
e: dread@dreadscott.net

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Goings on posted the week of March 24, 2008

CONTENTS:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1. Cecilia Vicuña, FF Alumn, at American Museum of Natural History, Manhattan, Apr 5
2. WACK! exhibition on PBS television, April 1st, 10:30 pm
3. Tina Keane, FF Alumn, at Serpentine Gallery, London, UK, thru April 13
4. Richard Foreman, Stuart Sherman, FF Alumns, at NYU, April 3-4
5. Andy Warhol, FF Alumn, at The Jewish Museum, Manhattan, thru August 3
6. Coco Fusco, FF Alumn, at The Project, Manhattan, opening April 3
7. Cornelia Lauf, FF Alumn, at Mercer Union, Toronto, Ontario, TONITE
8. Penny Arcade, FF Alumn, at Gene Frankel Theatre, Manhattan, Mar. 26, 8 pm
9. Franc Palaia, FF Alumn, at G.A.S., Poughkeepsie, NY, opening April 19
10. Agnes Denes, FF Alumn, releases new book of writings
11. Leslie Sharpe, FF Alumn, at:Dallas Contemporary, TX, thru May 10, and more
12. Donna Henes, FF Alumn, offers Spiritual Support Skill Seminar, April 5
13. Theodora Skipitares, Kay Hines, FF Alumns, at La Mama Annex, Manhattan, thru March 30
14. Tom Trusky, FF Alumn, at Claremont/Mckenna College, CA, March 31
15. Cary Peppermint, FF Alumn, at SUNY, Purchase, NY, March 27-29
16. Eleanor Antin, John Baldessari, Nancy Buchanan, Stanya Kahn, Allan Kaprow, The Kipper Kids, Tony Labat, Suzanne Lacy, Susan Mogul, Bruce Nauman, Martha Rosler, Nina Sobell, William Wegman, FF Alumns, at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA, thru June 8
17. Nicolás Dumit Estévez, Yoko Inoue, Martha Rosler, Susan Joy Share, Micki Watanabe Spiller, FF Alumns, at Center for Book Arts, Manhattan, Apr. 3, 6-9 pm
18. Chino, Lady Pink, FF Alumns, at Cinema Village, Manhattan, Apr. 15-May 8, 2008
19. Patty Chang, Anita Chao, FF Alumns, at MoMA, Manhattan, Mar. 30, and more
20. Susan Bee, Carolee Schneemann, Mira Schor, FF Alumns, at The Brooklyn Museum, Mar. 30, 3-5 pm
21. Judith Sloan, FF Alumn, at Queens College, Queens, NY, Mar. 30, 3 pm
22. Alison Knowles, FF Alumn, at Miguel Abreu Gallery, Manhattan, TONITE, 7:30 pm
23. Eric Heist, FF Member, at Schroeder Romero, Manhattan, opening April 4
24. Antoinette LaFarge, at Baltimore Theatre Project, Baltimore, MD, Mar. 27-30
25. Gabriel Martinez, FF Alumn, at Pulse, Manhattan, Mar. 27-30, and more
26. Annie Lanzillotto, FF Alumn, at The Brecht Forum, Manhattan, April 11, 7:30 pm
27. Joan Jonas, FF Alumn, at Artists Space, Manhattan, TONITE, 6-9 pm
28. John Cage, Julie Harrison, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol, FF Alumns, at Stevens Institute, April 5

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1. Cecilia Vicuña, FF Alumn, at American Museum of Natural History, Manhattan, Apr 5

Threads of Language is the last in a series of three performances poet/artist Cecilia Vicuña is presenting in New York this season.

The first was The Paracas Performance, at the BKLYN Museum, on March 1st,
The second mtEve, Mother of Threads, at MoMA/P.S.1, on March 16th, presented within the context of WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution at P.S.1, an exhibition that also includes her work from l974 “A Journal of Objects for the Chilean Resistance.”

In these multimedia performances the artist continues her exploration of the symbolic functions of weaving and language, as they relate to our current ecological crises.
She improvises her chants and poems while interacting with threads, her public and the projected images, which are her creation as well.

www.ceciliavicuna.org

Threads of Language
Performance
By Cecilia Vicuña
American Museum of Natural History
Saturday, April 5
• 2:15 p.m.
Linder Theater, first floor

Poet Cecilia Vicuña weaves indigenous poetic traditions of South America with Spanish and English, highlighting connections among language, Earth, and water through playful improvisations and chants.

the performance is presented within the context of the Symposium on Cultural and Biological Diversity
Saturday, April 5
11:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Kaufmann and Linder Theaters, first floor
Leonhardt People Center, second floor
Free with Museum admission

American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West and 79th st
New York NY 100024
www.amnh.org

For further information, call the Museum's Department of Education at 212-769-5315 between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

For information on the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation’s Spring Symposium, Sustaining Cultural and Biological Diversity in a Rapidly Changing World, please visit symposia.cbc.amnh.org/biocultural

This program is copresented, in part, with the People's Poetry Gathering's Endangered Language Initiative, a multiyear collaboration between City Lore and Bowery Arts & Science to document, present, and translate the poetry and musical traditions of lesser-used languages. For more information on the Initiative, visit http://www.peoplespoetry.org.

Public Programs are made possible, in part, by the Rita and Frits Markus Fund for Public Understanding of Science.

and

The Paracas Performance
Cecilia Vicuña

In this performance, Cecilia interacts with her film “Paracas”, a three dimensional animation of a two thousand year old textile now in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum. The textile, interpreted here as a celebration of the Thread of Life, was constructed in a sculptural three dimensional looping technique developed by the ancient artists of the Paracas/Nazca region of Peru. The structure of the performance echoes the three realities of the textile.

and

mtChondrial Eve, mother of threads
A performance by Cecilia Vicuña

In this ceremonial multimedia work Cecilia Vicuña weaves a language loom based on her own mtDNA, as she traces the double story of her ancestry and the discovery of the mother line for the whole of humankind through the struggle of the families of the disappeared in South America.

At P.S.1 MoMA
Sunday March 16th 4pm

The performance is part of: WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution curated by Connie Butler. (Cecilia’s work, 12 handmade books l973-74, also on view)

22-25 Jackson Ave at 46th Ave Long Island City, New York

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2. WACK! exhibition on PBS television, April 1st, 10:30 pm

WACK on TV is bumped to next Tuesday at the same time but different date-- instead it will be on April 1st. They are presenting the Elliot Spitzer sex scandal tonight instead- Who says this is a victimless crime?

I hope you will be interested in viewing WACK! Art of the Feminist Revolution next week on PBS which includes an interview with Mary Beth Edelson about WACK! as well as her own work.
PBS program “New York Voices” now airs at 10:30pm, Tuesday, April 1st

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3. Tina Keane, FF Alumn, at Serpentine Gallery, London, UK, thru April 13

Serpentine Gallery Public Programmes
Derek Jarman: Brutal Beauty, curated by Isaac Julien

Film Season It’s A Sin: the Films and Inspirations of Derek Jarman

Tickets: £11/£9 for Picturehouse members and concessions
Available from: www.picturehouses.co.uk
and 0871 704 2068

It’s A Sin is a season of feature-length films by Derek Jarman as well as films that influenced his practice. In addition, a short film programme has been selected by Tina Keane featuring works by Jarman’s contemporaries as well as younger film-makers. Screened at The Gate, Notting Hill, Greenwich Picturehouse, and Ritzy Cinema, Brixton, the series celebrates the work and legacy of this pioneering film-maker.

The Gate, 87 Notting Hill Gate, W11
12pm Sunday 24 February: The Last of England, Derek Jarman, UK, 1987

12pm Sunday 23 March: Caravaggio, Derek Jarman, UK, 1986

12pm Sunday 30 March: Le Testament d’Orphée, Jean Cocteau, France, 1960
This film is accompanied by the short film Un Chien Andalou, Luis Buñuel, France, 1929

12pm Sunday 6 April: Shorts Programme 1
A selection of short films by Derek Jarman and his contemporaries
Featuring:
Kiss 25 Good Bye, Steve Farrer, UK, 1991
Behind Closed Doors, Anna Thew, UK, 1988
Absurd, John Maybury, UK, 1986
Degrees of Blindness, Cerith Wyn Evans, UK, 1988
Domestic Sanitation: Latex Glamour Rodeo, Helen Chadwick, UK, 1976
Untitled, Christine Binnie and Jennifer Binnie and Wilma, UK, 2007

12pm Sunday 13 April: Shorts Programme 2
Derek Jarman’s Film Poetry of the Small Medium Lives On
Featuring
Black Palms, Jacopo Miliani, Italy, 2007
Beauty in Motion, Tina Keane, UK 2007
The Storm, Tina Keane, UK, 2007
Summerhouse, Laura Buckley, Finland, 2007
Swiss Plot, Julia Brazell, UK, 2006
Empathy with Trees, Seraphina Anderson, UK, 2006
Get Me a Mirror, Bonnie Camplin, UK, 2005
This is not an AIDS advertisement, Isaac Julien, UK, 1987
Loverfilm, Michael Brynntrup, Germany, 1996
Swan, Alia Syed, UK, 1986
Assassin, Michael Maziere, UK, 2006
The Space Between, Brad Butler & Karen Mirza, UK, 2005
Paris – FRANPRIX, Mark Aerial Waller, UK, 2003

Ritzy Cinema, Brixton Oval, Coldharbour Lane, SW2
12pm Sunday 30 March: Shorts Programme 1
A selection of short films by Derek Jarman’s contemporaries
For full listings see Gate Picturehouse Programme

12pm Sunday 6 April: Caravaggio, Derek Jarman, UK, 1986

12pm Sunday 13 April: Last of England, Derek Jarman, UK, 1988

Greenwich Picturehouse, 180 Greenwich High Road, SE10
12pm Sunday 23 March: Shorts Programme 2
Derek Jarman’s Film Poetry of the Small Medium Lives On
For full listings see Gate Picturehouse Programme

12pm Sunday 30 March: Caravaggio

12pm 6 April: Le Testament d’Orphée with the short film Un Chien Andalou

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4. Richard Foreman, Stuart Sherman, FF Alumns, at NYU, April 3-4

IMAP is announcing two upcoming programs in the month of April - A SYMPOSIUM and A PRESERVATION WORKSHOP:
IMAP and The Fales Library at New York University invite you to
Moving/Images: Preserving Downtown Time-Based Works
A symposium comprised of a gallery exhibition, an
evening screening, and a day of panel discussions about
the grant-funded preservation of film and video works
by Downtown New York artists.
Admission is free
EXHIBITION: Moving/Images: Preserving Downtown Time-Based Works
March 26 – July 31, 2008. Monday - Friday 10:00-5:00
Tracey/Barry Gallery, Bobst Library; 70 Washington Square South, 3rd Floor
SCREENING: Thursday, April 3, 2008. 7:00-9:00 pm.
Presenting works by: Jaime Davidovich, Richard Foreman, Richard Hell, Mabou Mines, Frank Moore, Stuart Sherman, David Wojnarowicz, and others.
PANEL DISCUSSION # 1: “Signal Loss: Saving Downtown Video”
Friday, April 4, 2008; 12:00-1:30 pm
Panelists: Rebecca Cleman, Jaime Davidovich, Chris Straayer, Sarah Ziebell.
Moderator: Ann Butler
PANEL DISCUSSION # 2: “Not Your Home Movies: Downtown Film”
Friday, April 4, 2008; 2:00-3:30pm
Panelists: Peggy Ahwesh, Bill Brand, Andrew Lampert, Nick Zedd.
Moderator: Brent Phillips
Location for Symposium events:
SCREENING & PANEL DISCUSSIONS: NYU Cantor Film Center, 36 East Eighth Street; Theatre 200
OPENING RECEPTION: Friday, April 4, 2008; 3:30-6:00pm, Tracey/Barry Gallery, Bobst Library; 70 Washington Square South, 3rd Floor
Moving/Images: Preserving Downtown Time-Based Works is funded in-part by The New York State Council on the Arts, and co-sponsored by Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP) with support from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs

and

On April 11th
IMAP is offering a half-day "Introduction to Media Preservation" Workshop
at The Bronx Museum of Art
Friday, April 11, 2008
12:00 - 4:00 PM
This half-day workshop will serve as an introduction to the issues and strategies necessary to tackle the challenges of videotape preservation. Designed to meet the needs of those with or without technical experience in video production, this workshop is geared to media makers and arts professionals, archivists, conservators, artists and other caretakers of media collections.
Location:
1040 Grand Concourse at 165th Street
Directions: http://www.bronxmuseum.org/info/directions.html
Workshop fee:
$50
$40 IMAP and AIM members
$25 Students with valid ID
(cash or check only)
RSVP: Reservations required; space is limited.
imap@imappreserve.org
Support for the IMAP Preservation Workshops provided by:

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5. Andy Warhol, FF Alumn, at The Jewish Museum, Manhattan, thru August 3

WARHOL’S JEWS:
TEN PORTRAITS RECONSIDERED
March 16 through August 3, 2008

The Jewish Museum
Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street
New York, NY
212.423.3200
Sat - Wed 11am - 5pm,
Thurs 11am - 8pm

http://www.thejewishmuseum.org

When it premiered in 1980, Andy Warhol’s Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century was met with both admiration and hostility. The series depicts such luminaries as Bernhardt, Einstein, Freud, and the Marx Brothers, among others. On view are photographs that Warhol used as source images, several preliminary sketches, a preparatory collage, an edition of the final silk-screen portfolio (of which 200 were published), and one of the five complete sets of paintings that he made for the series. Additional materials related to the portraits, including the list of nearly 100 “famous Jews” prepared by Warhol’s dealer, and television coverage of the artist’s trip to Miami for the world premiere of the series, will shed light on their creation and display.

The Jewish Museum initially exhibited three sets of paintings and an edition of prints in the fall of 1980. While Jewish audiences tended to embrace Warhol’s series, several leading art critics dismissed it as crass and exploitative. In the twenty-eight years since its debut, Ten Portraits has continued to confront viewers with these questions: Why did a Pop artist who otherwise displayed little interest in Jewish culture or causes create a series devoted to eminent Jews? How do we reconcile Warhol’s commercial motives with the high-minded portrayal of cultural and historical icons? How has our view of Ten Portraits changed since its first showing?

Following its New York showing at The Jewish Museum, the exhibition travels to the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA (October 12, 2008 through January 25, 2009).

ART, IMAGE AND WARHOL CONNECTIONS
Presented concurrently with Warhol’s Jews, this mini-exhibition features works by artists who directly respond to Andy Warhol or employ techniques often associated with Warhol’s oeuvre. Warhol and themes central to his practice – such as current events, consumer culture and the superstar, are seen reflected through 26 works by a multi-generational group of artists, including Deborah Kass, Alex Katz, Abshalom Jac Lahav, Adam Rolston, Ben Shahn, Devorah Sperber, and June Wayne.

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6. Coco Fusco, FF Alumn, at The Project, Manhattan, opening April 3

Coco Fusco
“Buried Pig with Moros”
April 3-May 2, 2008
Opening Reception, April 3, 6-8 pm
The Project
37 W. 57th St
3rd Fl.
Manhattan
212-688-1585
www.elproyecto.com

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7. Cornelia Lauf, FF Alumn, at Mercer Union, Toronto, Ontario, TONITE

Please join us on Tuesday March 25th, at 7pm, for an informal lecture by curator and Artists' Books publisher Cornelia Lauf. Born in Germany and based in Rome, Italy, Cornelia Lauf is a curator and editor of Artists' Books. She has organized exhibitions or published works by or about Maurizio Cattelan, Liam Gillick, Wim Delvoye, Diana Thater; Ken Lum, Fluxus, Robert Smithson, Joan Jonas, D.J. Spooky, David Byrne, Jan Dibbets, Joseph Kosuth and countless others.
She is the co-author of the most widely available text on Artists' Books: Artist/Author, published by D.A.P in 1998.
She will speak about her curatorial practice and Artists Books.
Mercer Union is located at 37 Lisgar Street, a block SW of Queen and Dovercourt, Toronto, Ontario For more information please visit www.mercerunion.org or contact dave@mercerunion.org or 416-536-1519.

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8. Penny Arcade, FF Alumn, at Gene Frankel Theatre, Manhattan, Mar. 26, 8 pm

Gail Thacker & The Gene Frankel Theatre Presents:

A Happening For the New Century
At
The Gene Frankel Theatre
24 Bond Street
Wednesday March 26, 2008
8:00pm

A Reading from Train to Pokipse by Rami Shamir Visuals by AVOID pi Featuring performances by Penny Arcade and Mother Flawless Sabrina

Train to Pokipse, the debut novel from twenty-seven year old Rami Shamir, explores the apathy and confusion of twenty-somethings in the decade of zeros.
Taking place in New York and Bard College after nine-eleven, Shamir takes us through the depths of both the emotional and physical landscape of young Americans in the privileged worlds of collegiate America and New York’s undergrounds. Shamir is currently shopping Train to Pokipse while he works on his second novel, Slaughter of the Innocents. He lives in New York.

AVOID pi at twenty-six years old has been expressing the voice of the people through graffiti for the last ten years. His work can be seen from Southern Mexico to Oslo with reach from the sides of freight trains to press to New York galleries. He believes that The world is ready for a change and that each one of us can bring about this change by exercising our right to freedom of speech.
AVOID will have works available for purchase and viewing.

Mother Flawless Sabrina (a.k.a. Jack Doroshow) came to international fame in
1968 when his film ?The Queen? won the Cannes Film Festival. Mr. Doroshow has been a vital part of New York?s artistic community throughout its various changes. From Truman Capote to William S. Burroughs to Andy Warhol, Mr. Doroshow has been in the center of New York’s cultural genius for decades. Today he finds himself a Socrates of sorts, nurturing young artists of all types. J. Edgar Hoover would probably have charged him with corrupting the youth of New York, but as Mr. Doroshow points out When you call Hell, J. Edgar Hoover’s answering the phone.

Penny Arcade (aka Susana Ventura) is an internationally acclaimed and respected writer, poet, essayist, cultural critic, performance, theater and video artist and cultural icon. She is one of the few performance artists to gain international renown in the mainstream theatre and entertainment world. Her long performance roots go back to her involvement as an original member of The Playhouse of The Ridiculous, NY's famed queer, glitter/glam political theatre, that influenced everything from Punk to current performance.

She was a teenage superstar for Andy Warhol's Factory, featured in the film Women In Revolt (now available on DVD). Penny Arcade occupies a rare position in the American avante-garde and counterculture, all the rarer because she is one of the few independent American artists who have been able to sustain a 40-year career in the theater. Penny Arcade is at the top of her game in an arena she has helped define and influence for four decades. She is the author of ten full length performance plays

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9. Franc Palaia, FF Alumn, at G.A.S., Poughkeepsie, NY, opening April 19

FRANC PALAIA
“Mysterious Traveler” Solo Exhibition
April 19 – May 11, 2008
Opening reception: Sat April 19, 5-8pm
G.A.S. Visual Art & Performance Space,
196 Main St., Poughkeepsie, NY 12601

G.A.S. (Gallery and Studio) is proud to present Mysterious Traveler by noted artist, FRANC PALAIA in his first one-man show in Poughkeepsie since 2003.

FRANC PALAIA will debut several new illuminated photo sculptural and mixed media works in an installation of over 25 luminous suitcases and other objects at G.A.S.’s sprawling two- gallery 1400 sf space. Palaia’s tough but humorous works reflect the multitude of shared experiences and dilemmas that tourists, travelers and wanderers encounter in 2008.

Palaia has traveled to over 25 countries and has transformed the “iconic” suitcase into a metaphor for what has become the symbol of today’s edgy state of transcontinental mobility. Palaia alters and manipulates found and recycled antique suitcases, valises, steamer trunks, attaché cases and other domestic objects into illuminated photo constructions that address diverse issues such as, politics, tourism, natural beauty, commercialism, war, terrorism and other anxieties.

Ever since the September 11th attacks on the WTC (in fact, Palaia had artwork destroyed in the WTC event), most people feel that traveling brings on equal doses of pleasure and dread. Palaia’s suitcase light boxes, (some totem-like stacked precariously, up to 8 feet high) and glowing with illuminated transparencies of exotic architecture, create a surrealistic scene reminiscent of a bizarre, forgotten baggage claim area in an unknown foreign port. Viewers delight at the sight of gloriously colorful, warm luminous images of majestic landscapes, colossal towers and structures from exotic Venice, Rome, Croatia, Ravenna and Pisa. However, lurking on the suitcase backs and sides viewers are startled to find aged and bogus and sometimes illuminated travel stickers that quietly send disconcerting cryptic messages like, “Welcome to Iraq, the Majestic Land of Rendition”. Palaia’s prosaic suitcases are vessels for his juxtaposed and thought-provoking ideas. His interventions of manipulated luggage frames pictures within pictures that seem to pull the viewer inward into his world. His savvy sculptural works cradle caution and humor in equal doses and provoke the viewer to visually wander inward into his back-lit photographic portals. In Palaia’s world, there is no need to actually travel, because the world’s sights and mysteries are right in his luggage!

In other works, Palaia uses digital photo frames hidden behind eradicated mirrors that alternate images in a single piece. In Cardboardominium, a humorous yet disconcerting piece on homelessness vs. the American Dream, Palaia transforms a horizontal cardboard refrigerator box into a brightly painted suburban house complete with vinyl siding, flower boxes and illuminated curtained windows on the outside, but the interior of this “suburban house”, sub-titled the “Bush Low Income Housing Program” presents a pathetic but orderly pile of filthy rags, old shoes, chicken bones, wine and beer bottles, a tiny, flickering B&W TV set and a small framed photograph of the White House tacked lovingly to the wall.

In a quote from the Poughkeepsie Journal in June of 2007, by Alison Nordstrom, curator of Photographs at the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY commenting on Franc’s works that she included in a national juried exhibition at the Center for Photography at Woodstock, goes on to say;
“Palaia’s surreal photo sculptures of suitcases and color images of travel cross boundaries and chart new territory, he has a distinctive, individual voice. His work looks like no one else’s. He’s developed a vocabulary for what he’s thinking about.”

FRANC PALAIA is an award winning photographer, muralist and sculptor, however, he is also an accomplished curator, educator, lamp designer, musician, TV producer and host with hundreds of solo and group exhibitions locally, nationally and internationally. He is listed in “Who’s Who in American Art” and has been awarded over 17 grants and fellowships including the prestigious Rome Prize, the Louis Comfort Tiffany grant and a Polaroid Sponsorship. Other grants include the Dutchess County Arts Council and the New Jersey Council on the Arts. He has exhibited in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NY, The White House, the Whitney Museum of American Art annex, the New Museum, Exit Art, Alternative Museum, Drawing Center, Sidney Janis Gallery, and in 2011 he will exhibit in a group show at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. Other shows include; OK Harris Gallery, Dorsky Museum of Art, Carrie Haddad Gallery, Newark Museum and the Center for Photography at Woodstock to name a few. His works are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art Library, Newark Museum, Polaroid Corp., Brooklyn Museum, Houston Museum of Fine Art, Johnson & Johnson, McDonald’s Corp., Senator Frank Lautenberg, author Oscar Hijuelos and singer Diana Ross among others.

For more information contact:

FRANC PALAIA at 845-486-1378, cell- 845-505-3123 FPalaia@earthlink.net
G.A.S. Visual Art & Performance Space gallery: 845-486-4592
Gallery Hours: Friday- Sunday, 12 – 6pm and by appt.
www.galleryandstudio.org www.baupalaia.blogspot.org

Bonus: After the opening the movie, “Jimmy’s Café” will be screened in the front gallery. This is a 30 movie film was filmed entirely in Poughkepsie and is a delightful love story directed, edited and photographed by Danny Simon and starring Roger Hendricks Simon. Roger Simon is a New York and Poughkeepsie director and acting coach who has taught and directed actors, singers and writers in New York, LA, London and throughout Europe. He is a graduate of Yale Drama School and has directed and acted for Joseph Papp at the New York Shakespeare Festival. He has directed and coached many noted actors such as: John Lithgow, James Earl Jones, John Travolta, James Woods, Samuel L. Jackson and others.

Bonus II: As an added surprise to Mysterious Traveler, Franc will park his Solar Photo-Car in front of G.A.S. during the opening. At dusk, or about 7pm, the Solar Car will self illuminate.

The opening festivities will also be videotaped for future broadcast on “Arts Focus”, the weekly Time Warner Cable TV program produced and hosted by Franc Palaia.

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10. Agnes Denes, FF Alumn, releases new book of writings

February 2008
THE HUMAN ARGUMENT
The Writings of AGNES DENES
(Edited, with an introduction, by KLAUS OTTMANN)
Paperback original, $25
320 pages, ills., first edition
ISBN-10: 0-88214-569-X
ISBN-13: 978-0-88214-569-3
SUBJECT: Art & Knowledge
The first complete collection of the writings of the American artist Agnes Denes. A pioneer of the environmental art movement and an artist of enormous vision, Denes investigates the physical and social sciences, philosophy, mathematics, linguistics, psychology, art history, poetry, and music. Her art involves ecological, cultural, and social issues and is often monumental in scale. “Agnes Denes is widely recognized as an artist who is able to transform her brilliant original ideas and concepts into innovative visual images and integral texts on an enormously wide range of topics and disciplines. By applying her visual philosophy to analytical writings, she has enriched our insights into problems of human and global survival.”
– Peter Selz (Univ. of California, Berkeley)

“Agnes Denes seems to straddle science and art in a way reminiscent of Leonardo.”
– Donald Kuspit (SUNY Stony Brook)

“In the history of art there gave been few artist’s artists – individuals who have emphasized in their work the raising of provocative questions and who have also tested the limits of art by taking it into new, unforeseen areas. Agnes Denes is one of these special artists.”
– Robert Hobbs (Virginia Commonwealth University)
SPRING PUBLICATIONS, INC.
PUTNAM, CONNECTICUT
www.springpublications.com
Available soon at amazon.com

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11. Leslie Sharpe, FF Alumn, at:Dallas Contemporary, TX, thru May 10, and more

"realtime: 08" Dallas Contemporary, Dallas Texas, through May 10, 2008

and

"Artistic Medium: Revelations of the Invisible", Museum of New Art,
Pontiac, MI April 5 - April 26, 2008

and

recipient, New Frontiers Award.

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12. Donna Henes, FF Alumn, offers Spiritual Support Skill Seminar, April 5

Dear Friends,

In winter, we tend to get lazy, sloppy, heavy, and
slow. This, in turn, makes us feel depressed, out
of control, and out of sorts.

Now is the time to emerge from the hibernating
mode, shake ourselves off, and get centered. A
mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual seasonal
cleansing can make all the difference to your health,
happiness and sense of well-being.

Join me for a Spiritual Support Skills Seminar

SPIRITUAL SPRING CLEANING: BODY, MIND & SPIRIT
CLARITY FROM THE INSIDE OUT

SATURDAY, APRIL 5

1-5PM

Learn how to purify and sanctify your body, mind, spirit,
and space.

Learn simple techniques from cultures around the
world to rekindle your perspective, sanity, equilibrium,
good cheer, and positive attitude.

Learn how to detox, declutter, bathe, and fast in order
to sweep away the detritus that clogs your body, fogs
your brain, and bogs you down.

CLEAR! CLEANSE! RENEW! REFRESH! REVIVE! RELEASE!

$50.
Bring a friend and you each get $10. off!

Advance paid reservations required.

Info & reservations (pay by credit card): 718-857-1343

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13. Theodora Skipitares, Kay Hines, FF Alumns, at La Mama Annex, Manhattan, thru March 30

La Mama, E. T. C. and Skyzaver Productions Present
Medea
Adapted, designed and directed by Theodora Skipitares, with video by Kay Hines
For reservations please call 212-475-7710

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14. Tom Trusky, FF Alumn, at Claremont/Mckenna College, CA, March 31

PREMIERE CALIFORNIA SCREENING

The recently restored Nell Shipman film, "The Grub-Stake" (1922) (100 min., now tinted, as per original) DVD projected with live accompaniment by the Bijoux Orchestrette of Indian Valley, Idaho Introduction by Tom Trusky, (FF Alumn) Boise State University Screening courtesy of Profs. Audrey Bilger and James Morrison of Claremont/McKenna College

Shipman is the recently re-discovered Silent "Indie" writer, actor, director, editor and producer now being recognized for her humane treatment of animal actors, her reverence towards nature, and her insistence that films be shot on-location--not back lots. As well, women are the heroes in all her films--assisted by animal co-stars.
Long thought lost, "The Grub-Stake" is considered to be Shipman's magnum opus.

Mary Pickford Auditorium
Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA
7:30PM
Monday, March 31st

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15. Cary Peppermint, FF Alumn, at SUNY, Purchase, NY, March 27-29

EcoArtTech in "Off the Grid" Exhibition @ the Neuberger

EcoArtTech will be demonstrating their Environmental Risk Assessment Rover-¬AT (see description below) at Purchase College, SUNY, Purchase, NY each evening at dusk on 3/27, 3/28, and 3/29, 2008.

Ecoarttech's ERAR-AT is part of the Neuberger Museum of Art's "Off the Grid"
Exhibition, March 30 - June 1, 2008. "Off the Grid" features works that subvert and circumvent conventional infrastructures. Co-presented by the Neuberger Museum of Art and free103point9 and curated by Jacqueline Shilkoff, Galen Joseph-Hunter, Tianna Kennedy, and Tom Roe.
http://www.free103point9.org/events/1678

Participating artists: Benjamin Cohen, Dylan Gauthier, and Stephan von Muehlen, EcoArtTech, eteam, Max Goldfarb, Louis Hock, Nina, Katchadourian, Kristin Lucas, Joe McKay, Trevor Paglen, Temporary Services, Seth Weiner, Bart Woodstrup

Environmental Risk Assessment Rover-¬AT, Version 1.0, 2008 http://www.ecoarttech.net/erar

"Sooner rather than later, one comes up against the law that so long as risks are not recognized scientifically, they do not exist--at least not legally, medically, technologically, or socially, and they are thus not prevented, treated or compensated for. No amount of collective moaning can change this, only science. Scientific judgment's monopoly on truth therefore forces the victims themselves to make use of all the methods and means of scientific analysis in order to succeed with their claims."
-German risk theorist Ulrich Beck

ERAR¬AT is a mobile, solar- and GPS-powered, networked video installation that will accumulate and aggregate the environmental threats and risks faced by the population in its immediate location. ERAR-AT performs the difficulty of perceiving, evaluating, and understanding risk scenarios and presents an assessment of its given locale by producing a unique fourteen-tiered threat level embedded live within video projections onto local natural and architectural surfaces.

What kind of local and global environmental risks do you face everyday? How far is the closest superfund site or nuclear power plant or agribusiness?
How do the 148 industrial chemicals already in every American human body interact with the synthetic hormones and antibiotics in the dairy products we eat? How many chemicals are in human breast milk? How do the chemicals in your toothpaste interact with the pesticides on your food? Why has modernity, which was supposed to create a sense of security, produced more anxiety and threats than ever? Can scientific data and research help us understand the "riskiness" of contemporary life?

ECOARTTECH is Christine Nadir & Cary Peppermint ERAR Programming & Research Assistant: Colin Twomey

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16. Eleanor Antin, John Baldessari, Nancy Buchanan, Stanya Kahn, Allan Kaprow, The Kipper Kids, Tony Labat, Suzanne Lacy, Susan Mogul, Bruce Nauman, Martha Rosler, Nina Sobell, William Wegman, FF Alumns, at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA, thru June 8

GETTY EXHIBITION SHOWCASES 40 YEARS OF GROUNDBREAKING VIDEO BY CALIFORNIA ARTISTS
California Video
At the J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center, March 15-June 8, 2008
October 9, 2007
Over the past four decades, video has played an increasingly central role in artistic production throughout the world. This has been particularly true in California, where many of the state’s most prominent artists have used the medium to produce some of their most significant works. Co-organized by the Getty Research Institute and the Getty Museum, and on view in the J. Paul Getty Museum’s special exhibition pavilion at the Getty Center, March 15 through June 8 2008, California Video highlights the unique sensibilities of West Coast video, while providing the first major survey of video art produced in California.

California Video will feature more than 50 single-channel videos and 15 installations by 58 artists including Eleanor Antin, John Baldessari, Brian Bress, Nancy Buchanan, Chris Burden, Jim Campbell, Meg Cranston, Harry Dodge & Stanya Kahn, Allan Kaprow, Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, Bruce Nauman, Tony Oursler, Martha Rosler, Jennifer Steinkamp, T.R. Uthco and Ant Farm, Diana Thater, Bill Viola, and William Wegman. Approximately half the works in the exhibition will be drawn from the Getty Research Institute’s (GRI) extraordinary collection of video art, which, since its acquisition of the Long Beach Museum of Art Video Archive in 2006, has become one of the largest institutional collections in the world. The GRI’s superlative collection will be augmented by the loan of important video installations, rarely exhibited historical single-channel works, and a selection of recent works by established and emerging artists.

A highlight of the exhibition will be the reconstruction of the original installation of The Eternal Frame (1975-76), by the Bay Area collectives T. R. Uthco and Ant Farm. The well-known video in this installation depicts the artists re-enacting the iconic Zapruder footage of the assassination of John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas, while also documenting the puzzled and emotional responses from tourists and passersby. When presented at the Long Beach Museum of Art in 1976, the video was exhibited on an antique television within an elaborately constructed 1960s living room filled with dozens of pieces of JFK memorabilia. For the first time since its original installation, a full reconstruction of this piece will be featured in the Getty’s exhibition.

The single-channel video works in the exhibition cover a broad range of activities by artists from Northern and Southern California, including performance and conceptual art, experimental narratives, lush video abstractions, and politically and socially engaged documentaries. A number of these works have rarely or never been publicly exhibited before, including very early videos by the Kipper Kids, Tony Labat, Tony Oursler, and Paul McCarthy. California Video also showcases work by lesser-known pioneers of the medium, including remarkable performance works by Cynthia Maughan and Wolfgang Stoerchle, early punk music videos by Joe Rees and Target Video, and Arthur Ginsberg’s The Continuing Story of Carel and Ferd (1970-75), a surprising experiment in social documentary that is a clear precursor to reality television.

In California Video, a number of spectacular large-scale video installations will be presented, including a new site-specific work by Jennifer Steinkamp, Oculus Sinister (2008), which will be projected inside the oculus of the Getty Museum’s special exhibitions pavilion. Paul Kos’ Chartres Bleu (1983-86) replicates a stained-glass window from Chartres Cathedral, using a tower of 27 video monitors representing each of the window’s 27 panes. Within 12 minutes, the video panes fade from daylight into night. In Jim Campbell’s Home Movies (2006), a 16-foot grid of variably bright LEDs (light emitting diodes) casts a soft light onto the wall behind it, causing viewers to perceive hazy and evocative images reminiscent of home movie footage. The exhibition also includes the first public exhibition on the West Coast of an installation from Mike Kelley’s Day is Done series, as well as installations by Hilja Keading, Bruce Nauman, Diana Thater, Bill Viola, and Bruce and Norman Yonemoto.

California Video will also feature a “video study room,” which will provide visitors with an alternative way to experience the single-channel works in the exhibition. Using touchscreen kiosks in the study room, viewers will be able to see all of the single-channel videos in the exhibition on demand, view interviews with selected artists, and read additional biographical information about each artist. The video study room will also feature additional videos not on view in the main exhibition.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated companion book, California Video: Artists and Histories. Featuring extensive entries on each artist, this volume includes more than three dozen new interviews, as well as video transcripts, rare reprints, historical and interpretive essays, and hundreds of illustrations.

California Video is co-organized by the Getty Research Institute and the J. Paul Getty Museum, and is curated by Glenn Phillips, senior projects specialist and consulting curator, Department of Contemporary Programs and Research, Getty Research Institute.
MEDIA CONTACT:
Rebecca Taylor
Getty Communications
310-440-6427
retaylor@getty.edu

About the Getty:
The J. Paul Getty Trust is an international cultural and philanthropic institution devoted to the visual arts that features the Getty Conservation Institute, the Getty Foundation, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Getty Research Institute. The J. Paul Getty Trust and Getty programs serve a varied audience from two locations: the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Getty Villa in Malibu.

Sign up for e-Getty at www.getty.edu/subscribe/ to receive free monthly highlights of events at the Getty Center and the Getty Villa via e-mail, or visit our event calendar for a complete calendar of public programs.

The J. Paul Getty Museum collects in seven distinct areas, including Greek and Roman antiquities, European paintings, drawings, manuscripts, sculpture, and decorative arts, and European and American photographs. The Museum's mission is to make the collection meaningful and attractive to a broad audience by presenting and interpreting the works of art through educational programs, special exhibitions, publications, conservation, and research.

Visiting the Getty Center: The Getty Center is open Tuesday through Thursday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. It is closed Monday and major holidays. Admission to the Getty Center is always free. Parking is $8. No reservation is required for parking or general admission. Reservations are required for event seating and groups of 15 or more. Please call 310-440-7300 (English or Spanish) for reservations and information. The TTY line for callers who are deaf or hearing impaired is 310-440-7305.

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17. Nicolás Dumit Estévez, Yoko Inoue, Martha Rosler, Susan Joy Share, Micki Watanabe Spiller, FF Alumns, at Center for Book Arts, Manhattan, Apr. 3, 6-9 pm

Annual Benefit and Silent Auction
Travelogues
Thursday, April 3rd , 6 to 9 pm
The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, New York 10001
(212) 481-0295
info@centerforbookarts.org

This year's benefit is from 6:00 to 9:00 o'clock in the evening on Thursday, April 3. We are pleased to honor the following individuals whose commitment to book arts has advanced the field:
Honorees
Milan Hughston (Chief of Library and Museum Archives at The Museum of Modern Art)
Arthur Jaffe (Arthur & Mata Jaffe Collection at Florida Atlantic University Libraries)
Peter Kruty (Master Letterpress Printer)
Hedi Kyle (Master Binder)
Martha Rosler (Artist)

Catering
Travelogue Edible Books: chef-produced, artist-designed
Saffron 59 - Southeast Asian hors d'oeuvres
Wine courtesy of Casa de Vinos
Worldly Libations </TD< tr>

Entertainment
Kagero (Japanese Gypsy Rock)

Attire
Favorite Adventurer

Silent Auction and Raffle
As part of the evening activities we have planned a silent auction featuring prints and artist's books and a raffle featuring limited edition postcard sets.

Silent Auction
Books, Prints and More Manuel Acevedo
Barbara Barnes Allen
Desirée Alverez
Lynne Avadenka
Mare Blocker
Amy Chan
Beatrice Coron
Lesley Dill
Takuji Hamanaka
Randolph Huebsch
Yoko Inoue
Rajkamal Kahlon
Karen Kunc
Catarina Leitäo
Hilary Lorenz
Carlos Motta
Benjamin D. Rinehart
John Risseeuw
Susan Joy Share
Tennille Shuster
Barbara Takenaga
Robert The
Cynthia Thompson
Susan Weil (courtesy of Vincent FitzGerald & Co.)
Tony White Raffle
Limited Edition Postcard Sets Delphi Basilicato
Ana Cordiero
Tim Fite
Roni Gross
Yukari Hayashida
Barbara Henry
Nancy Loeber
Amber McMillan
Alisa Ochoa
Sara Parkel
Peter Schell
Champe Smith
Jeremy Thompson
Robert Warner
Shanna Yarbrough
Corinna Zeltsman

Edible Books Artists and Chefs
Andy Birsch (chef)
Terri Boddie (artist)
Laura Davidson (artist)
Lauri Ditunno (chef)
Nicolás Dumit Estévez (artist)
Dana Kravis (chef)
Franco Mondini-Ruiz (artist)
Sofia Osman (chef)
Rocco Scary (artist)
Tattfoo Tan (artist)
Austin Thomas (artist)
Micki Watanabe Spiller (artist)
Jon Zeltsman (chef)

Patrons Society
*Cindy Au-Kramer
*Virginia Bartow
Donna Brodie
Thatcher M. Brown III
Joan K. Davidson
*Sharon Dolin
Vincent Fitzgerald
*Brian Hannon & Sharon Krieger, MD
*Michael & Deborah Held
Babette Katz
Eylene King
*John Koegel
*Dierdre Lawrence
Roselyn Leibowitz
Lois Lowenstein
David B. Marshall, Jr. Brian Mattson/Patents + TMS, PC
*Susan Mills
*Richard Minsky
*Sara Parkel
*J. Fernando Pena
Sarah Plimpton
*David S. Rose
*Jae Jennifer & Corey Rossman
*Robert J. Ruben, MD
*Robbin Ami Silverberg
Kenneth Soehner
Catherine Steinmann
Jean Wardle & Ray Mortenson
*Mark S. Waskow
*F. Ellen Zeifer
*Board of Directors

Order tickets by calling the Center at (212) 481-0295.

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18. Chino, Lady Pink, FF Alumns, at Cinema Village, Manhattan, Apr. 15-May 8, 2008

YesSirEee, Folks-

The global graffiti documentary Bomb It finally has its New York and Los Angeles theatrical screening dates locked in.

You NYers can check it out at Cinema Village Fri. April 25 - Thu. May 8, 2008.

http://bombit-themovie.com
http://www.cinemavillage.co

Jon Reiss’ Global Graffiti Documentary
Bomb It
Announces US Theatrical Screening Dates – April/May
DVD Release on May 27, 2008

LOS ANGELES, CA – Antidote Films is pleased to present Bomb It, the global graffiti documentary by award winning director Jon Reiss. Featuring street artists and top graffiti writers from 5 continents Bomb It is the first film to update the story of graffiti with a truly international perspective. The film’s North American theatrical release kicks off on April 4th in Seattle, Washington. The DVD release will follow on May 27, 2008 through Docurama Films. Personalities such as Cornbread, Lady Pink, acclaimed hip hop artist and former graffiti writer KRS One, international art machine Shepard Fairey, Brazilian bombing twin brothers Os Gemeos, and others share their lives with the camera. Globally comprehensive as well as politically relevant, a recent review by IGN.com reported, “… At the core of the film is a poignant social statement about public space and the war being waged for it.” To learn more please visit http://bombit-themovie.com and http://www.myspace.com/bombitthemovie. For continual updates about this film and graffiti culture in general, such as events, artist rights, screenings, visit the Bomb It blog at http://bombit-themovie.com/blog.

Bomb It’s theatrical run hits these fine cities this spring:

April 2008

- 4/4 - 4/10 Seattle, WA Grand Illusion Cinema[www.grandillusioncinema.org]
- 4/10 - 4/14 San Francisco, CA Red Vic Movie House+ premiere party (on Thu. 4/10 at 11pm - 111 Minna) [http://www.redvicmoviehouse.com]
- 4/18 - 4/24 Portland, OR Clinton Street Theater [http://www.clintonsttheater.com]
- 4/23 - 4/29 Columbus, MO Ragtag Cinema [http://www.ragtagfilm.com]
- 4/25 - 5/8 New York, NY Cinema Village [http://www.cinemavillage.com]
- 4/25 - 5/1 Chicago, IL Facets Cinematheque [http://www.facets.org]
- 4/26 Madison, WI U of Madison [http://www.mcscuw.com]
- 4/26 - 4/29 Albuquerque, NM The Guild Cinema [http://www.guildcinema.com]

May 2008

- 5/8 - 5/10 Wilmington, NC Jengo’s Playhouse [http://www.cucalorus.org/blog]
- 5/9 - 5/10 Jacksonville, FL San Marco Theatre [http://www.sanmarcotheatre.com]
- 5/15 - 5/22 Denver, CO Starz Film Center + Kaffeine Buzz parties & all-day graff conf on Sat. 5/17 [http://www.denverfilm.org]
- 5/23 - 5/28 Los Angeles, CA Laemmle Sunset 5 [http://www.laemmle.com]
- 5/28 Austin, TX Alamo Draft House - one night - design conference [http://www.drafthouse.com]

June 2008

- 6/7 - 6/9 Atlanta, GA Eyedrum Theater [http://www.eyedrum.org]
- 6/11 New Orleans, LA Contemporary Arts Center [http://www.cacno.org]

Bomb It’s festival run continues internationally, as well:

- 3/14 & 3/16 Cleveland, OH Cleveland International Film Festival [http://www.clevelandfilm.org]
- 3/13 - 3/21 Tiburon, CA Tiburon International Film Festival [http://www.tiburonfilmfestival.com]
- 4/3 - 4/6 Durham, NC Full Frame Documentary Film Festival [http://www.fullframefest.org]
- 4/4 - 4/14 Singapore Singapore International Film Festival [http://www.filmfest.org.sg]
- June '08 Saragossa, Spain Espontánea Film Festival
- 6/19 - 6/29 Johannesburg, SA Encounters South African International Doc Festival
- 7/3 - 7/13 Cape Town, SA Encounters South African International Doc Festival [www.encounters.co.za]

Starting with graffiti’s roots in New York and Philadelphia, Bomb It goes on to explore the graff cultures in London, Paris, Amsterdam, Hamburg, Barcelona, Berlin, Cape Town, São Paulo, and Tokyo, before finally wrapping up in Los Angeles. The film features original footage with artists around the world who have taken the form and applied it to their particular cultural and social conditions, from Latin America, where graffiti has been adapted into the mural tradition, to Japan where anime inspired rakugaki juxtaposes with formal calligraphy and conformist societal norms, to Europe where a dadaist/surrealist tradition produces deliberately confrontational prankstering.

While some believe the roots of graffiti can be traced back to pre-linguistic cave markings and the innate human need for self-expression, graffiti remains a highly controversial issue. Using a myriad of original interviews as well as guerilla footage of graffiti writers in action, Bomb It tells the story of contemporary graffiti from its roots in ancient rock paintings through Picasso to Latino placas through its notorious emergence as a visual adjunct to the rise of hip hop culture in 1970's New York City culminating in its current, pervasive presence in a myriad of forms – on the streets and in pop culture throughout the world, co-opted into advertising, on our clothing, etc.

The controversy surrounding graffiti is an integral part of the story: from anti-tagging groups, to the impact of New York City's infamous "Quality of Life" laws which directly targeted illicit writing (the film includes an interview with NYC’s most outspoken graffiti critic, NYC Councilman Peter Vallone Jr.), to the proliferation of these laws throughout the world. Graffiti – as well as stenciling, stickering, postering, and any unsanctioned graphic “interference” in public space - raises important questions that delve deep into our contemporary social structure such as: Who has the right to express themselves? What is a canvas? Where should art take place? If public space is a forum for discussion, which voices will be heard?

Bomb It is the most comprehensive documentary about graffiti and street art to date. Roughly 200 artists were interviewed for this film. In addition to those named above, interviewees included Mear One, Terrible T-KID 170, Taki 183, Zephyr, Tribe, Tats Cru, Chaz Bojorquez, Robbie Conal, Ron English, Cope 2, Daim, Revs, Blek Le Rat, Very One, Stay High 149, Tracy 168, KET, Chino, Revok, Pez, Sixe, Zezao, Faith47, and so many more (see http://bombit-themovie.com/artists/default.html for full list of artists interviewed).

The film’s soundtrack combines a striking roster of hip-hop, electronic music and native sounds from some of the locales visited. Highlights include tracks by Immortal Technique, Big Syphe, The Budos Band, Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, Disco D, Donald Byrd, Spank Rock, Virgin Tears vs Dave The Hustler, and Mathematics. Indie record labels such as Highpoint Lowlife, Daptone Records, and Ninja Tune were extremely helpful in the process. Soweto Gospel Choir, ACFC Choir, and Black Noise underscore the South African scenes while the São Paulo portion boasts songs by Brazil’s Arthur Joly, and ARD, and Uruguay’s Federico Ramos Composed.

“Filmmaker Jon Reiss finds himself drawn to subcultures with guts,” the Village Voice wrote in May of last year during an interview for Bomb It’s world premiere at the 2007 Tribeca Film Festival. Named one of “10 Digital Directors to Watch” by Daily Variety, Reiss has covered the West Coast punk explosion, documented the notorious San Francisco performance group Survival Research Laboratories, rave culture in his debut feature-length documentary, Better Living Through Circuitry, and now graffiti culture. He also has a non-doc under his belt: the award-winning dark psychological drama, Cleopatra's Second Husband. Also famous for his music videos, in 1995 the Toronto Film Festival curated a retrospective of Reiss' music videos, which included 1992’s acclaimed Nine Inch Nails video, “Happiness in Slavery.” Jon Reiss’ work has screened at festivals, theaters and cultural centers throughout the world as well as on channels such as IFC, Showtime, and the Sundance Channel. Reiss received his MFA from the UCLA Film School.

For more information, images and interviews, please contact Green Galactic’s Lynn Hasty at 213-840-1201 or lynn@greengalactic.com.

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19. Patty Chang, Anita Chao, FF Alumns, at MoMA, Manhattan, Mar. 30, and more

Patty Chang and David Kelley's video Flotsam Jetsam is part of the new directors/new films festival at MoMA. The screenings are:

Sun Mar 30: 7:30 (MoMA)
Mon Mar 31: 6:15 (Walter Reade Theater)

New Directors / New Films
March 26 - April 6, 2008

Flotsam Jetsam. 2007. USA. Directed by Patty Chang and David Kelley. Edited in collaboration with the directors by Anita Chao. In 2005 an American nuclear submarine crashed into an uncharted underwater mountain in the Pacific Ocean. Two years later, artists Patty Chang and David Kelley constructed their own submarine and launched it in the Yangtse River in China, just below the Three Gorges Dam. With members of a Chinese opera troupe on board, the sub's journey becomes an imaginative performance exploring space, identity, and memory. 30 min.

ND/NF 2008 screenings will take place at the Film Society of Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater (WRT), 165 West 65th Street between Broadway & Amsterdam Avenues on the upper level and at The Museum of Modern Art's The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 1 (MoMA), 11 West 53 Street between Fifth & Sixth Avenues.

http://www.filmlinc.com/ndnf/program.html

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20. Susan Bee, Carolee Schneemann, Mira Schor, FF Alumns, at The Brooklyn Museum, Mar. 30, 3-5 pm

"Beyond the Waves; Feminist Artists Talk Across Generations"
Sunday, March 30th, 3-5pm
Panelists: Susan Bee, Emma Bee Bernstein, Mira Schor, Carolee Schneemann, Brynna Tucker at The Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum
Free & Open to Public (With Museum Entry Fee) - 3:00 - 5:00 PM

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21. Judith Sloan, FF Alumn, at Queens College, Queens, NY, Mar. 30, 3 pm

Crossing the BLVD performance of monologues, sounds and images of new immigrants and refugees with Warren Lehrer and Judith Sloan.
Post show discussion moderated by Brian Lehrer, talk show host WNYC radio and wnyc.org

Goldstein Theatre, Queens College
All seats $12. Order online at http://www.kupferbergcenterarts.org/ or call: 718.793.8080.

About the Performance: As immigration policy is being hotly debated around the country in terms of national, economic, and cultural security, Crossing the BLVD presents the very human stories of why new immigrants and refugees have migrated to the United States and what their experiences have been since they came here pre- and post-9/11. Writer and artist, Warren Lehrer is the tour guide providing commentary and perspective as actress and oral historian Judith Sloan “channels” many of the people they interviewed on their three-year journey around the world through the borough of Queens. Sloan’s vocalization work and movement bring these characters to life. Their performance is illuminated by projections of Lehrer’s stunning photographs of the subjects, urban landscapes, objects they have carried with them from home to home, and Queens’ landscapes, along with soundtrack of original music, sounds, and voices. [Soundtrack includes music by Scott Johnson and Gogol Bordello.]

"Immigrant life as told in the intimate, rich, comic, ironic and sad stories so often seen but not heard in America's big cities..." The Washington Post

“A turbo-driven Eyewitness guide...BLVD is a demonstration of the way you can explore the world without leaving home.”
The Guardian, London

“An offbeat ethnic tour of one of the country's most ethnically diverse counties. Riveting stories...”
The New York Times

“Crossing the BLVD boldly carries the tradition of oral history into the 21st Century... Electrifying!
Eve Ensler, author, oral historian, performer The Vagina Monologues

Winner Brendan Gill Prize, Municipal Art Society of New York 2004

The performance is held in conjunction with Lehrer and Sloan’s Multimedia Exhibition of the same name at Queens College’s Godwin-Ternbach Museum. The exhibition includes 90 portraits, story excerpts, 14 sound stations, and an interactive Mobile Storybooth. It runs through June 28 and will be on view before and after the performance on March 30th.

http://www.crossingtheblvd.org

http://www.earsay.org

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22. Alison Knowles, FF Alumn, at Miguel Abreu Gallery, Manhattan, TONITE, 7:30 pm

RICE AND BEANS
A music performance by Charles Curtis & Alison Knowles
Tuesday, March 25 at 7:30 pm at Miguel Abreu GalleryI will do a poem titled Mantra for Jessie (some help in sleeping). It is a juxtaposition of sound and color in a literal narrative poem. In my mind it is a lullaby. I remember Simone Forti my friend in California who says her mother used to read her recipes to put her to sleep. This Mantra appears in a pamphlet put out by the Great Bear series of Something Else Press, 1979. The pamphlet is titled More by Alison Knowles.

Charles will play a score I made for him entitled Rice and Beans for Charles Curtis. He will also play a pieces by John Cage and Morton Feldman from the 1950s.

Lentils were eaten from the wild before domestication. They are the oldest bean in existence first found in the Franchthi Caves of Greece in 1,100 B.C. They appeared in the Bronze Age and then India and Ethiopia as well. Beans are the first food associated with the poor. Documents in tablet form with recipes have been discovered, but most recently in a rock crevice on cliffs off the Pacific coast what may be an ancient vestment has appeared. Its origins are completely unknown. It is made of paper melded with muslin containing red lentils, a tangle
of cords and black curled marks perhaps some primitive language. Egyptians imagined it was sufficient to eat lentils to enlighten the mind and open the heart, and perhaps as well to make music!

Alison Knowles

PROGRAM
Rice and Beans

a. Mantra for Jessie (some help in sleeping), 1979
Poem from Something Else Press Pamphlet More by Alison Knowles
written and performed by Alison Knowles

b. Feldman and Cage: graphic notations from the 1950's
Projection 1 for solo cello: Morton Feldman, 1950
Intersection 4 for solo cello: Morton Feldman, 1953
Solo for Cello: John Cage, 1957-58

c. Rice and Beans for Charles Curtis, 2008
60 x 100 cm graphic notation score of rice, beans, cloth and paper
made by Alison Knowles, performed on cello by Charles Curtis

Morton Feldman met John Cage in the winter of 1949-50 at a performance of the Webern Symphony opus 21; his Projection 1 for solo cello dates from 1950. In a graph-like form, Feldman classifies various ways of making sounds on the cello (plucking, bowing and touching harmonics), and fixes these with regard to high, medium and low registers in a more or less regular time grid. Intersection 4 elaborates a similar notational method with a higher concentration of sounds.

Cage's class in Composition of Experimental Music at the New School was attended by most of the musicians and artists later grouped as Fluxus: Higgins, Brecht, Ichiyanagi, MacLow, Hansen etc. Also at the New School, Cage's class in mushroom identification led to the founding of the New York Mycological Society, under whose auspices Alison Knowles' friendship with Cage began. The Solo for Cello, an extract from the orchestral parts of the Concert for Piano and Orchestra, dates from the exact period of Cage's activities at the New School. In the Solo, all sounds are preceded and followed by silence, and are placed freely in time at the discretion of the performer.

A John Cage notation, while substantially altering the inherited notational logic of the marks on the page, never departs from the sense of the score as a logical representation. An Alison Knowles notation, on the other hand, is itself an instrument, as well as the record of an art-making process which, in the moment of its making, is inseparable from an audible and performed act. It is non-reproducible, except through the interpretation of a performance; and its performance is not intended to take place without the physical presence of the notation, there to be seen as its interpretation is heard.

For more information, please contact the gallery:
36 Orchard Street (between Canal & Hester), New York, NY 10002
Tel 212.995.1774 • Fax 646.688.2302 • post@miguelabreugallery.com

Gallery hours: Wednesday – Sunday, 11:00 AM to 6:30 PM
Subway: F to East Broadway; B, D to Grand Street or J, M, Z to Delancey / Essex Street

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23. Eric Heist, FF Member, at Schroeder Romero, Manhattan, opening April 4

SCHROEDER ROMERO
637 WEST 27TH STREET GROUND FLOOR NEW YORK, NY 10001
(212) 630-0722 www.schroederromero.com

ERIC HEIST
UStrust

April 4 - May 10, 2008
Opening Reception: Friday, April 4, 6-8pm
Schroeder Romero is pleased to present UStrust, Eric Heist's fourth solo show with the gallery. Through his past shows, Heist has developed an increasingly allegorical voice in which the personal collides with the larger institutions that shape our lives. For this show, Heist has created a fictional corporation, a bank named UStrust, as the site where the individual attempts to remain visible within a faceless corporation reflecting its self-interests.

The installation mimics a bank's interior, including variations on a teller window, posters, crowd control stanchions, cubicle partitions, and video surveillance. In a series of advertising posters, images from the artists relatively comfortable life a supermarket, the workplace, home, car, and bank are interwoven with texts from the poverty-stricken in the United States. These appropriated texts become open, less tied to the actual feelings of invisibility expressed by the poor than to a fear of dematerialization in the artist and viewer. The text runs along the bottom of each poster in small text like an FDIC disclaimer, something one is not really meant to read:
I feel like I'm nothing

I steal to feed them

Its my third offense

They took my kids, took my freedom

They spend a fortune punishing me

This theme of invisibility flows through the show: A teller window reflects the viewer in black. Video footage of a failed robbery depicts the artist in front of this same window, humbled by his inability to get past his own reflection. This situation is complicated by a post-robbery act of vandalism in which the teller window has been spray-painted by a reversal of the corporate name: "UStrust" becoming a sardonic command, trust us." The final act of invisibility is depicted in a life-sized diorama: a black dais at the center of the gallery, surrounded by incandescent black-lights and black velvet ropes a negative stage on which lies a draped body, presumably that of the robber/artist, embracing his act of self-conscious martyrdom simultaneously unseen and public, seductively giving form to the invisible. Painting-like felt-covered panels adorn the surrounding walls in UStrust's corporate colors of black and blue and transform the typical workplace, the cubicle, into a flattened, uninhabitable corporate sign and emptying the fictional interior of possible witnesses.

This corpse at the center of the show startles not through morbidity but through humor and self-deprecation. Conflicted feelings of powerlessness tempered with privilege, the limits of lording corporations and art's own limitations in addressing social inequities all guide this impulse, negatively cementing our places in a complex network of consumption, a network that the artist's desire to transcend does not escape.

A series of thematically-related drawings and gouaches depicting shoe displays, homeless artifacts, and swimming pools will also be included. Presented separately from the installation these function as an unlikely corporate collection for the elite, and reminders of the full spectrum of existence through markers of class. Drained, unmaintained swimming pools and the nomadic belongings of the homeless in tropical environments are both sobering and hopeful in the sense of providing escape from an otherwise oppressive existence defined through economy.

Special thanks to The Outpost video editing facility, Brooklyn, NY, Bridget Webber, Michael Waugh and Laura Parnes.

Please contact the gallery for more information. The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11am - 6pm.

March 27 - 30, PULSE Contemporary Art Fair, New York
New Location: Pier 40, West Side Highway @ West Houston

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24. Antoinette LaFarge, at Baltimore Theatre Project, Baltimore, MD, Mar. 27-30

Baltimore Theatre Project
Invites You To

Playing The Rapture
Written by Antoinette LaFarge with contributions by John Mellies Directed by Robert Allen Sound design by Philip White Machinima projections by Antoinette LaFarge A new performance work about computer games, The Rapture, role modeling, and falling off a horse...

("The Rapture," a moment in time when all true Christians will vanish from the earth and leave the rest of humankind to struggle through a period of extreme tribulation.)

Playing The Rapture
5 Performances Only!
DATE: Thursday, March 27 - Sunday, March 30, 2008
TIME: Evenings, 8 p.m.; Sunday Matinee, 3 p.m.
LOCATION: Theatre Project, 45 West Preston Street

TICKETS: General Admission, $20.00; $15/seniors and artists; and $10/students; Group Sales (10 or more, $15 each)

Purchase tickets at 410.752.8558 OR
<http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=zbws8kcab.0.0.jpkc5icab.0&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.missio
ntix.net%2F&id=preview>www.missiontix.com
<http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=zbws8kcab.0.0.jpkc5icab.0&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.theatr
eproject.org%2F&id=preview>www.theatreproject.org

more info: http://www.forger.com/rapture/

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25. Gabriel Martinez, FF Alumn, at Pulse, Manhattan, Mar. 27-30, and more

Gabriel Martinez’s video "Sauna" to be included in the “Pulse Play” Program- “Sameness, Difference and Desire,”
Pulse Contemporary Art Fair New York at Pier 40, March 27th – 30th.

PULSE PLAY
“Sameness, Difference and Desire”
Curated by Bill Arning

In making sense of the visual world the human eye scans constantly, and then when objects of interest are identified the mind is engaged and starts making distinctions with other previously identified objects; Are they the same or different? If different, how are they different? If the same, are they the same, similar or two iterations of the same phenomenon? This is true if the objects under consideration are fellow humans or products on the supermarket shelf. Somehow in this visual perusal the close examination leads to inchoate feelings of desire, some for sameness, some for difference. In this selection of international video artists this process of comparison provoking desire is replayed in each video in ways that are also both exactly the same and completely different.

also...

Gabriel Martinez's exhibition "Self-Portraits," presented at Boston's Samson Projects October - December 2007, is reviewed by Karen Kurcznski in the current "March/April" edition of Art Papers.

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26. Annie Lanzillotto, FF Alumn, at The Brecht Forum, Manhattan, April 11, 7:30 pm

Friends, here are two major events. Remember Invitations are not Obligations. I invite you with love, and so you know what is going on with me.

I am reading from a new publication April 11th, and I am mounting a performance installation on April 14th and 15th.

Thank you for your constant love, support, and being there

Annie

April 11: I'm reading from "Wallid Walla Bint," (boy or girl) memoir essay about my time in Egypt studying tropical disease and cross-dressing as Abdul, while finding Allah.

Friday, April 11th
7:30 p.m.
Free
The Brecht Forum
451 West Street (between Bank + Bethune)
New York City

www.brechtforum.org
on "Manhattan's Left Bank" at 451 West Street (that's the West Side Highway) between Bank & Bethune Streets

This reading is a Launch for:
The International Journal of Feminist Politics
Volume 9 Issue 4 2007
Politics of Water: A Confluence of Women's Voices
Guest Editors Paola Corso and Nandita Ghosh
ISSN: 1468-4470 (electronic) 1461-6742 (paper)
Publisher: Routledge <http://www.informaworld.com/rout> Press Taylor &
Francis Group, tf.enquiries@informa.com or
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/spissue/RFJP-si.asp to order copies

"This special issue on women and the politics of water is a response to a
growing concern for the unequal access men and women have to water in an
increasingly fragile physical environment. As per the United Nations policy
brief on gender and water, although women have primary responsibility for
managing domestic water supply, sanitation and health, their central role in
water management is overlooked."
-Excerpt from "Women and the Politics of Water: An Introduction" by Nandita
Ghosh

"Consumers International (CI), which represents consumer organizations in
115 countries, officially made the link between women and water on
International Women's Day in 2004 when it announced that water is a consumer
right and that women are in the forefront of needing and securing that
right. This special issue is an expression of our deep admiration for women
all around the world who are putting their bodies and their lives on the
line for water."
-Excerpt from creative introductory essay "Confluence" by Paola Corso

and

Monday April 14th
7:00
$22
Roulette
20 Greene Street (between Grand and Canal)
UMAMI Festival for Food and Performance www.umamifestival.com
Gastronomic Interactive Installations

I am performing with the voices of pushcart peddlers; ancient street cries.
for the entrance fee, you get to attend the panel at 4:00 "Experimental Cuisine Collective Panel"
(if the fee is too steep, I'll have to put you in the show)

The festival will also show films and the ice cream of Miwa Koizumi
Tuesday, April 15th
8 PM -- same performance, same deal as last night with a 6:00 panel of Chef's you can go to.

*This is what promises to be the first annual UMAMI festival, curated by Yael Raviv, with Ame Gilbert. Check out the website to see the whole festival program.

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27. Joan Jonas, FF Alumn, at Artists Space, Manhattan, TONITE, 6-9 pm

Charta Books & Artists Space

invite you to celebrate Armory Show Week
with the Launch of Charta’s Spring 2008 Titles on contemporary art and culture

Tuesday, March 25th
Artists Space, 38 Greene Street, 3rd floor, New York
from 6 till 9 pm

at 6 pm

Conversation between Luigi Ontani and Joan Jonas,
moderated by Luca Massimo Barbero (Associate Curator at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice)
Book signings will follow: Luigi Ontani. MarmArmonia (Charta, 2007) and Joan Jonas (Charta, 2007)

from 7 to 9 pm

Presentation of Charta’s New Titles
it’s a chance to meet some of Charta’s key artists and authors

Adam Berg • Gabriele Basilico and Massimo Vitali. Disco to disco • Tacita Dean. Film Works • Carlo Ferraris • Fortunate Objects • Giuliana Michelotti. Inform • Joan Jonas • Jon Kessler. The Palace at 4 a.m. • Luca Pignatelli. Paintings • ORLAN. The Narrative • conrad-bercah and w office. West Workroom. Theory + Practice • Rui Chafes • The Sites of Latin American Abstraction • Stefano Arienti. The Asian Shore • Steps Off the Beaten Path. Nineteenth-Century Photographs of Rome and its Environs

Donation of 101 Charta books to Artists Space
presented to inaugurate the new Artists Space Book Corner

Two exhibitions currently on view at Artists Space
“Nina in Position” and “Combined Faulty Acts,” a project by Shana Lutker, both curated by Jeffrey Uslip (the exhibitions will close on March 29th)

Live Cuban Music played by Gato Loco LOW END

Italian Wines

To order Charta publications in the US, contact D.A.P. at +1-800-338-2665 or on www.artbook.com

Edizioni Charta srl
Milano (Italy)
Via della Moscova, 27 - 20121
Tel. +39-026598098 / +39-026598200
Fax +39-026598577

CHARTA BOOKS Ltd.
New York City (USA)
Tribeca Office
Tel. +1-313-406-8468

visitate il nostro sito
http://www.chartaartbooks.it
visit our website

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28. John Cage, Julie Harrison, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol, FF Alumns, at Stevens Institute, FF Alumns, April 5

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
Please join me for a weekend (or part of one) of Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.), founded in 1966by engineers Billy Kluver and Fred Waldhauer, and artists Robert Rauschenberg and Robert Whitman, to provide artists with access to new technology and to promote collaborations between artists and engineers. I've attached a poster and press release in pdf format for further information.

All events take place at Stevens Institute of Technology, Babbio Center (River & 6th Streets) in Hoboken, NJ and are free and open to the public. Sponsored byHarvestworks Digital Media Arts Center and the Art & Technology Program at Stevens Institute of Technology.

Saturday, April 5, 2008

2:00 Exhibition opening E.A.T. Revisited:Documents and Works (through April 28).Included is an installation of photographic documentation entitled The Story of E.A.T.: Experiments in Art and Technology,19602001by Billy Kluver; a selection of classic works: Floats by Robert Breer and Silver Clouds by Andy Warhol; and an installation of new works, Transduced Objects, created in a workshop inspired by David Tudors Rainforest, taught by John Driscoll and Phil Edelstein to artists and students from both Stevens Institute and Harvestworks.

3:00 Panel Art and Technology, Historical and Current Perspectives with panelists Robert Whitman, Julie Martin, John Driscoll, Steve Bull, Scot Gresham-Lancaster and Anne Swartz (Savannah College of Art and Design), moderated by Julie Harrison (Stevens Institute of Technology).

5:30 Performance Cellphonia: Tempo Variable (Cellphonia: Changeable Weather by Steve Bull and Scot Gresham-Lancaster, with Phil Edelstein, HansTammen, and Brooks Williams a surround sound memorial concert for John Cage and David Tudor in which live performance, cellphone calls, transduced objects, and synthetic voices are mixed by the musicians and the neural synthesis ETANN, or electronically trainable analog neural net, developed by Forrest Warthman and Scot Gresham-Lancaster for David Tudor.

6:15 Reception to meet the artists, panelists, and organizers

Sunday, April 6, 2008(suggested donation $5, free to students and seniors)

1:00 Film Screening 9 Evenings: Theater & Engineering include Robert Rauschenbergs Open Score; John Cage’s Variations VII; ֹOvind Fahlstrom Kisses Sweeter than Wine and a work-in-progress on David Tudor’s Bandoneon! Producer Julie Martin and director Barbro Schultz Lundestam, will be present to introduce the films and answer questions.

Hope to see some of you there!
Cheers,

Julie Harrison

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Goings on posted the week of March 10, 2008

CONTENTS:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1. Martha Wilson, FF Alumn, at Mitchell Algus Gallery, opening March 22, 6-8 pm
2. Marc Bloch, Robert Delford Brown, FF Alumns, at Cameron Art Museum, opening March 27, and more
3. Penny Arcade, Carolee Schneemann, Cindy Sherman, FF Alumns, at Central Connecticut State University, thru April 18
4. Helen Varley Jamieson, FF Alumn, now online
5. John Baldessari, Stanya Kahn, Coco Fusco, Louise Lawler, Sherrie Levine, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Matt Mullican, Michael Smith, Javier Téllez, FF Alumns in the Whitney Museum of American Art Biennial, thru June 1
6. Linda Montano, FF Alumn, at St. Pats, Manhattan, April 12
7. Elly Clarke, FF Alumn, at London Gallery West, UK, opening April 3
8. Clifford Owens, William Pope.L, Michael Smith, FF Alumns, win Tiffany Foundation grants of $25,000
9. Aaron Landsman, FF Alumn, in Metro NY, March 6
10. Joshua Fried, FF Alumn, at Cave Canem, Manhattan, TONITE, and more
11. Naeem Mohaiemen, FF Alumn, now online, and more
12. Carey Lovelace, FF Alumn, at Art in General, Manhattan, Mar. 26, 6:30 pm
13. Seiji Shimoda, FF Alumn, at Fado, Toronto, Mar. 22
14. Linda Sibio, FF Alumn, at Roadside Attraction, CA, May 17, 6:30 pm
15. Terry Dame, FF Alumn, at Pioneer Arts Center, MA, opening Mar. 28 and more
16. Jed Speare, FF Alumn, in Wire magazine, March 2008
17. Deborah Garwood, Robin Tewes, FF Alumns at Philoctetes, Manhattan, thru April 16
18. Nao Bustamante, Nicolás Dumit Estévez, FF Alumns, at El Museo del Barrio, Manhattan, Mar. 19, 6:30-8:30 pm
19. Beth B, FF Alumn, at SVA, Manhattan, Mar. 25, 7 pm
20. Eric Brown, FF Member, at Chashama, Manhattan, thru March 23
21. Donna Henes, FF Alumn, at South St. Seaport, Manhattan, Mar. 20
22. Ligorano/Reese, Vitaly Komar, Sherrie Levine, at Carriage Trade, Manhattan, thru Mar. 30
23. Anne Flournoy, FF Alumn, now on YOUtube
24. Juana Valdez, FF Alumn, finalist for Cintas Foundation award

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1. Martha Wilson, FF Alumn, at Mitchell Algus Gallery, opening March 22, 6-8 pm

The Mitchell Algus Gallery presents an exhibition of photo/text work by Martha Wilson opening on Saturday, March 22 and continuing through Saturday, April 26, 2008. A reception for the artist will be held on the day of the opening from 6 to 8 PM. This exhibition is accompanied by a catalog with an essay by art historian Jayne Wark.
Martha Wilson’s pioneering photo/text and performance work is little-known, original and important. Done between 1971 and 1974 at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) where Wilson was teaching English, the work takes then-emerging conventions of language based conceptual art into new territory, examining the construction and perception of identity and gender. Wilson’s emphasis on subjectivity and transformation in the presentation and recognition of self placed her art at a productive remove from mainstream conceptualism where the ruse of analytical objectivity was the prevailing mode. Her work’s sly humor was also at odds with contemporary art world taste, particularly coming as it did from a woman. The current show is Martha Wilson’s first one person gallery exhibition.
While Wilson’s work conjures parallels with artists like Suzy Lake in Toronto and Eleanor Antin and Lynn Hershman in California, its non-ideological tenor cut across the essentialist and collectivist perspectives of the feminist establishment of the early 1970s. This divergence became explicit in Judy Chicago’s reaction to a 1974 performance by Wilson at Womanspace Gallery in Los Angeles which Chicago deemed “irresponsible demagoguery.” Yet Wilson’s prescient mix of role playing and image presentation was culturally precocious and would soon be picked up by a younger generation of artists, Cindy Sherman being the most obvious heir.
Martha Wilson was born in Pennsylvania and received an MA in English literature from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia. After beginning doctoral work Wilson left to teach at NSCAD when her thesis advisor said her ideas about Henry James were “visual art” and not literature. (Wilson’s then-partner, Richards Jarden, was an MFA student at NSCAD.) In the early 1970s NSCAD had a highly regarded program, directed by David Askevold, which emphasized cutting edge conceptual work. Many prominent artists and critics visited the College, including John Baldessari, Robert Barry, Dan Graham, Lee Lozano, and most importantly Lucy Lippard, who included Wilson’s 1971 Chauvinist Pieces in her documentary history Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object.
Leaving Nova Scotia in 1974 Martha Wilson settled in New York where she became the founding director of Franklin Furnace, the legendary downtown center documenting artist books and performance. In 1997 the FF artist book collection was acquired by MOMA and Wilson moved the organization into cyberspace. Martha Wilson was also a founding member with Ilona Granet, Donna Henes, Ingrid Sischy and Diane Torr of the vaudeville feminist punk rock group DISBAND, video of which is featured in WACK!, Art and the Feminist Revolutioin. The show however, does not include any of Wilson’s photo/text work or solo performance video. Martha Wilson continues to perform, mostly political satire, most frequently impersonating former and aspiring first ladies.
Mitchell Algus Gallery—511 West 25 Street, Second Floor—New York 10001—Tel: 212-242-6242

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2. Marc Bloch, Robert Delford Brown, FF Alumns, at Cameron Art Museum, opening March 27, and more

Media Contact:
Ashley Hammons
910.395.5999 x1005
ahammons@cameronartmuseum.com

ROBERT DELFORD BROWN: Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics [March 28-August 3, 2008]

Wilmington, NC-“ROBERT DELFORD BROWN: Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics” opens at the Cameron Art Museum on March 28 and will remain on view through August 3, 2008. A free public opening reception will be held on Thursday, March 27 from 7-9 pm, and a private members preview and gallery talk will be held the same evening from 6-7 pm. The exhibition’s guest curator, artist-writer Mark Bloch (NYC), and Robert Delford Brown, will both be present.

“ROBERT DELFORD BROWN: Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics” is the artist’s first museum exhibition following an active career of 50 years. Brown was in the vanguard of many major art movements following his arrival in New York in 1959, including Performance Art, Fluxus, Pop Art, Happenings and Correspondence art.

In 1964, Robert Delford Brown shocked both the public and fellow artists with his groundbreaking performance entitled Meat Show. The event took place in a meat locker at the Washington Meat Market in New York City, and consisted of huge amounts of blood, meat and lingerie fabric. This performance had a great impact at the time, and offered a prescient vision of future contemporary art works, such as Damien Hirst’s recent installations with animal carcasses ( “School: The Archeology of Lost Desires, Comprehending Infinity, and the Search for Knowledge” shown at Lever House Art Collection, NYC, Nov 2007-February 2008). Through his early career, Brown encountered, communicated and collaborated with artists Ed Moses, Nam June Paik, Allan Kaprow, Ray Johnson, Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Claes Oldenburg and many other, now widely recognized figures in art history.

In 1992, Allan Kaprow, who first conceived of Happenings in 1957, noted of Robert Delford Brown’s early work: “…(he) threw a monkey wrench into the avant garde in those days. He was a visionary you couldn’t ignore or forget. Robert Delford Brown’s transcendent vision takes on a great significance”. Renowned curator and art maverick, Walter Hopps, wrote to a colleague about Brown in 1971, observing he was “a tremendously talented artist” and held a unique position among his peers. [A previously unpublished 2003 interview with Walter Hopps by V. Vale is included in the exhibition’s publication].

Robert Delford Brown was born in Colorado in 1930, later moving to California where he received his B.A. (1952) and M.A. (1958) from UCLA. In 1959 Brown moved to New York City where he lived and worked for the next 40 years. The artist currently lives and works in both New York City and Wilmington, North Carolina.

A concurrent exhibition and video screenings will be held at Wabi Sabi Warehouse of Independent Art Company, an alternative space in Wilmington, NC., opening to the public Friday, March 28 6-9 pm.

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3. Penny Arcade, Carolee Schneemann, Cindy Sherman, FF Alumns, at Central Connecticut State University, thru April 18

Female Forms and Facets:
Artwork by Women from 1975 to the Present
Featuring
Judy Chicago
with
Carolee Schneemann CindySherman PennyArcade
Janine Antoni
Lisa Yuskavage Sara Risk Judy Fox Candice Raquel Lee
March 13 - April 18, 2008*
* closed for Spring Break, March 17 - 21
Opening Reception:
Thursday, March 13, 2008, 4:30 - 7:00PM
Artist Lectures by Carolee Schneemann, Judy Fox, Candice Raquel Lee, and Penny Arcade,
3:00 - 4:15, preceding reception
Performance by Penny Arcade, 5PM
http://www.art.ccsu.edu/Gallery/2007-08/FFF.html
Wine and Hors-d'oeuvres - Free Admission - Plenty of Free Parking
Exhibition Hours:
Monday - Friday, 1-4 PM and by Special Appointment
Free Admission

Central Connecticut State University
Art Gallery
Maloney Drive
New Britain, ConnecticutConnect

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4. Helen Varley Jamieson, FF Alumn, now online

hi friends,
finally i have managed to put some words & photos together about my trip to cuba:
http://www.creative-catalyst.com/articles/cuba08.html


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5. John Baldessari, Stanya Kahn, Coco Fusco, Louise Lawler, Sherrie Levine, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Matt Mullican, Michael Smith, Javier Téllez, FF Alumns in the Whitney Museum of American Art Biennial, thru June 1

The Whitney Biennial 2008 opens today and runs through June 1. For the first time the Biennial will extend beyond the Museum to Park Avenue Armory (at 67th Street) with installations and performances daily through March 23. A full schedule of events is available at whitney.org/biennial

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6. Linda Montano, FF Alumn, at St. Pats, Manhattan, April 12

3 HOUR PRAYER RETREAT
WHEN:SATURDAY, APRIL 12,2008
WHERE: ST PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL, 5TH AVE,NYC
TIME: 10:45-2 PM
HOW:MEET 10:45 IN FRONT OF CATHEDRAL(IF LATE, JUST GO IN......FEEL FREE TO USE THIS SILENT TIME ..SITTING,WALKING,READING .. ETC)
WHAT:RETREAT'S FOCUS IS:PRAYERS OF PETITION/PRAYERS OF THANKSGIVING....
EXAMPLE:PETITION: I........PRAY FOR A HEALING OF..........
THANKSGIVING: I.............GIVE THANKS FOR THE ........

WRITE IN:IF YOU CANT ATTEND SEND A ONE SENTENCE PRAYER REQUEST AND WE CAN PRAY FOR YOU THAT DAY; SEND TO:
lindamontano@hotmail.com

SUGGESTIONS:
1.BATHROOM, FOOD ETC CONSIDER BEFORE.

2 DRESS FOR CHURCH.

3.AT COMMUNION, IF NOT CATHOLIC,AND YOU WANT TO PARTICIPATE IN THE COMMUNION SERVICE,GO UP FOR A BLESSING FROM THE PRIEST AND INDICATE YOUR INTENTION IS TO RECEIVE A BLESSING AND NOT HOLY COMMUNION BY CROSSING YOUR ARMS OVER YOUR CHEST AND BOWING YOUR HEAD.OTHERWISE DONT GO TO THE ALTAR AT COMMUNION.(THERE ARE 3 MASSES ATTHE MAIN ALTAR BEGINNING AT NOON. )

4.FOR CATHOLICS INTERESTED: CONFESSIONS ARE HEARD IN THE BACK....LEFTSIDE, STARTING AT NOON.

5.AT THE END OF THE 3 HOURS, EVERYONE MEET AT 2PM IN FRONT OF THE CATHEDRAL TO SAY GOODBYE.

SEND:
PRAYER REQUESTS TO:lindamontano@hotmail.com

THIS PRAYER RETREAT CAN ALSO BE PARTICIPATED IN AT HOME ,BY JOINING US AT THIS TIME, IN SILENCE AND PRAYER.

THANK YOU, LINDA

For performances, Art/Life Counseling, teaching, videos:
LINDA M MONTANO
THE ART/LIFE INSTITUTE
185 ABEEL ST
KINGSTON , N.Y. 12401
845-246-4482
www.bobsart.org ; www.vdb.org

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7. Elly Clarke, FF Alumn, at London Gallery West, UK, opening April 3

Dear Friends

I'm showing the Alternative Funding Strategy (- "Unique Elly Clarke photos not yet taken on her mobile phone in India Jan-Feb 2008", which I sold in December via ebay -) at this exhibition, which opens on 3rd April at London Gallery West at the University of Westminster in Harrow. (Northwick Park nearest tube.)

The project was devised to raise funds to enable me to travel to India in January to research a film I plan to make later this year in collaboration with sex workers and Aravanis (the transgender community) in Madurai, Tamil Nadu. I was granted access to these communities though the Russ Foundation (www.russfoundation.com).


All photos were taken on my Sony Ericcson K800i at the time requested by purchasers. They were then sent first by text message and then as single-edition digital prints from India via the post to purchasers.

Some images are still awaiting purchasers - they'll be shown blind in their envelopes, with only title and time to identify them.

Maybe see you there! See below for more info on the exhibition and conference which accompanies it.

Elly

Image: 150108 13:02 View from Window of Man Who Owns Land Upon Which Parking Lot Will be Built. Belur, Karnataka.


FILMOBILE CONFERENCE / SCREENINGS / EXHIBITION

FILMOBILE is a network project bringing together the mobile phone industry, filmmakers and artists working with mobile devices.

FILMOBILE is organising a gallery exhibition, cinema screenings and an international conference in London on the 4/5 April 2008. The events will explore the cultural impact brought about by new mobile technologies and will encourage debates between artists, filmmakers, the media and the new mobile industry.

The FILMOBILE EXHIBITION will feature mobile art works by Mark Amerika, Camille Baker, Bebe Beard, Melissa Bliss, Elly Clarke, Romain Forquy, Steve Hawley, Brian House, Brooke A. Knight, Simon Longo, Anne Massoni, Kasia Molga, Sylvie Prasad, Michele Pred, Henry Reichhold, Max Schleser, Jo Thomas.

The FILMOBILE CONFERENCE is a major international event including more than 22 speakers from the USA, South Africa, Australia, Germany, Italy and the UK exploring the prospects and possibilities of mobile technologies in the domain of art and media practice. A live web broadcast with the Mobilefest in Brazil is scheduled to take place during the conference. For detailed conference program see www.filmobile.net.

As part of the conference FILMOBILE will present a CINEMA SCREENING, which will curate for the first time a dedicated world premiere program for mobile feature productions, including SMS Sugar Man, Why didn't anybody tell me it would become this bad in Afghanistan, Nausea and Max with a Kaitai.

For detailed program information see: www.filmobile.net
The events are free to attend but registration via email or text-message is essential. Email toinfo@filmobile.net or text FILMOBILE to 81707 including your name and email address to register (texts cost 1 standard message).

Conference and Screenings are at The Old Lumiere Cinema, 309 Regent Street, London W1R 8AL (tube Oxford Circus).

Friday 4 April

16:00 – 18:00 FILMOBILE conference
18:30 – 20:30 FILMOBILE cinema screening
20:30 FILMOBILE wine reception

Saturday 5 April

10:30 – 18:30 FILMOBILE conference

Exhibition Private View:
Thursday 3 April, 5pm – 8pm at London Gallery West, Watford Road, Harrow HA1 3TP (tube Northwick park)
Featuring a live performance by Jo Thomas and Visual Rhythms

Exhibition Opening Times:
Daily 9am – 5pm, 4 April until 4 May at London Gallery West, Watford Road, Harrow HA1 3TP (tube Northwick park)

FILMOBILE is supported by the University of Westminster, HEIF, London Westside, Centre for Research and Education in Art and Media (CREAM), London Gallery West, Immedia 24 and the new media eXchange. FILMOBILE is part of NODE.London Spring'08 season (http://nodel.org).
Max Schleser
info@filmobile.net
www.filmobile.net
mobile + 44 [0] 791 9032166

--
Elly Clarke
ellyclarke@gmail.com
art: http://www.axisweb.org/artist/ellyclarke
photography: http://www.ellyclarkephotography.com

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8. Clifford Owens, William Pope.L, Michael Smith, FF Alumns, win Tiffany Foundation grants of $25,000

The Tiffany Foundation awarded $25,000 grants (as chosen by Amada Cruz, Clara Kim, John Perreault, Cindy Sherman (FF Alumn), Lowery Stokes Sims, Paul J. Smith and Judith Tannenbaum) are: Amy Balkin, Iona Brown, Juan Angel Chavez, Nicole Cherubini, Patricia Cronin, Einar and Jamex de la Torre, Alejandro Diaz, Sharon Hayes, Elana Herzog, Tim Hyde, Fay Ku, Walter McConnell, Wardell Milan, Dutes Miller and Stan Shellabarger, Wangechi Mutu, Kori Newkirk, Kelly Nipper, Odili Donald Odita, Kaz Oshiro, Clifford Owens (FF Alumn), William Pope.L (FF Alumn), Robert Pruitt, Aida Ruilova, Arthur Simms, Michael Smith (FF Alumn), Tavares Strachan, Julia Meltzer and David Thorne, Anna Von Mertens, Allison Wiese and Christie Wright.

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9. Aaron Landsman, FF Alumn, in Metro NY, March 6

Metro, March 6, 2008
“An Eye on the Neighbrohood”
Review – Instead of a theater, you arrive at someone’s home. Wine and Cheese sit on the kitchen counter – help yourself.

Experimental playwright Aaron Landsman brings his “open House” to all five boroughs, where apartment dwellers co-host the show tih Foundry Theatre. On and around a sofa, a young couple (Heidi Schreck and Paul Willis) grapple with iussues of trust, economics and what constitutes “shelter” in contemporary New Yrok.

Through March 16, various locations in NYC, $15, 866-811-4111
www.thefoundrytheatre.org

by Elizabeth Zimmer

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10. Joshua Fried, FF Alumn, at Cave Canem, Manhattan, TONITE, and more

{from composer Joshua Fried}
{RADIO WONDERLAND -- the media-mashing/multi-metric/high-concept}
{everyday object/spaced-out/body-moving/1-man dance band} {*Unsubscription info below*}

Two performances next week!

First--a return to Tom Swirly's Psychedelic Circus on St. Patrick's Day.

Then--a trio at the Warper Party in groovy Williamsburg on the 19th.

And oh! If you're interested, some nice action shots of last month's set in Minneapolis are up at radiowonderland.org. Shortcut is here:

http://tinyurl.com/2cfp2v

Thank you Ms. Hagen!

Monday 17 March 2008 10pm
St. Patrick's Day night!

Tom Swirly's Psych-o-delic Circus
at
Cave Canem, Under Lucky Cheng's
24 First Avenue (at 2nd St)
New York, NY 10009
$5

Anything can happen, including more than one Radio Wonderland set, dancing on stage, weird heckling, and spontaneous jams with Tom Swirly on his clarinet-like MIDI wind controller. Wear a costume.

As Tom Swirly puts it:

A monstrously strange avant-garde musical/talk show with variety acts, magic tricks, weirdness, sensation and live electronic music.

Wednesday 19 March 2008 MIDNIGHT
The Astral Freaks--A trio!

The Warper Party
b) Rooms of Omnidigital DJs and Biomorphic Musicians Projected Images, Workshops, and Interactive Art too

at
Supreme Trading
213 N. 8th St
Williamsburg, Brooklyn 11211
718 599 4224
Free!

with Hans Tammen, on Endangered Guitar
Tom Shad, on Electric Bass with digital whammy and yours truly RADIO WONDERLAND, on Radio Wonderland

Do we really have a name? Are we truly The Astral Freaks? Who knows.
We still can't agree. The Three Condoleezas, The Jazz Compactors, The Bit Shifters? At least we have a blurb, courtesy of Rebus PR:

"The newest entry into the technologically-enhanced extended improv sweepstakes is the trio of virtuosic veterans Hans Tammen--"endangered guitar", Tom Shad--Blue Man bassist, and Joshua Fried--AKA "Radio Wonderland" on his shoes, steering wheel and laptop. What sets these guys apart is the engagement of the body as well as the ear and the mind (read: they know how to groove). Expect the most current sonic DSP (that's digital signal processing in case you missed it), as well as muscular jams that fly Jimi and Miles into the heart of NYC's vortex of alt-jazz techno jams."

Thanks for reading.

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11. Naeem Mohaiemen, FF Alumn, now online, and more

Sediments from a few projects are now online. Also, I'm in a Dhaka group show until March 19th, and a panel in New York March 26th.<http://www.kabul-reconstructions.net/index/aig.html>

Red Ant Motherchod, Meet Starfish Nation
*Jumma Namaj came and went, I had other plans. Ants crawled on cracked stone, dried husks turned into soldiers and an orange peel refused to cooperate. A project on 1975, CIA coups (or not) and soldiers of fortune.
For "Conspiracy Papers", a publication from Transmediale, Berlin.

http://shobak.org/projects/red_ant.shtml

Prints from this project are showing at:

*Contemporary Bangladesh Art (1948-2008)* Asiatic Society Gallery Behind Curzon Hall, Dhaka University

*Exploding Lotus*
Art & Culture Center, Miami
http://artandculturecenter.org/exploding-the-lotus

Collaborative Art+Community
Wednesday, March 26th, 6:30 pm
Art in General gallery, New York

Making It Together: Women's Collaborative Art + Community, the exhibition guest-curated by Carey Lovelace for the Bronx Museum, surveys the period in the 1970s and early 80s when women artists, inspired by the 70s feminist movement, worked collectively in new ways to engage communities and address social issues. Taking the exhibition as a point of departure, this roundtable (the second of two held in conjunction with the show) brings together artists with community-based, site-specific, public and activist practices to discuss how their work extends the history of feminist collaborative and community-based artmaking, and how their contexts, choices, and collaborations shape the politics of their practices.

Tomie Arai
Doug Ashford
Jamal Cyrus + Kenya Evans / Otabenga Jones & Associates Naeem Mohaiemen Prerana Reddy Artists Against The War
Moderator: Gregory Sholette
Organized by Mariam Ghani+Chitra Ganesh

http://www.kabul-reconstructions.net/index/aig.html

*Everybody Wants To Be Singapore*
For Carlos Motta's project "The Good Life". The Good Life is a long-term, in-progress, experimental documentary project that engages and critiques documentary practice itself. It is an examination of the regional history, perception and effects of US interventionist policies in Latin America, at a time of global critical awareness of those politics. The work is composed of an installation, an Internet archive, a series of photographs and publications. For the debut at ICA, Carlos made a takeaway publication that contained text from four contributors. My text is online here:

http://shobak.org/text/hoggole_singapore.shtml

*For Runa Islam's joint show with Tobias Putrih in Modena, "Lost Cinema Lost", I wrote a catalogue text in response to her work.

http://shobak.org/projects/LostCinema_p1-15.pdf

I also did an "exquisite corpse" riff, filming rickshaw carcasses in homage to Runa's film "First Day Of Spring". A print from that project was featured in the e-flux project "Pawnshop".

http://shobak.org/projects/dear_runa.shtml

Appropriately enough, Pawnshop has filed for bankruptcy. Is it Real or Memorex?

http://e-flux.com/shows/view/5167
shobak mailing list
shobak@idash.org
http://idash.org/mailman/listinfo/shobak

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13. Seiji Shimoda, FF Alumn, at Fado, Toronto, Mar. 22

Fado Performance presents: Seiji Shimoda Saturday March 22, 2008 @ 8pm ($5) Lower Ossington Theatre 100A Ossington Avenue, Toronto (one block north of Queen St. W.)

http://www.performanceart.ca

Seiji Shimoda is one of Japan's most active, well-known and respected performance artists. He is a performer, a poet, an arts advocate, organizer, curator and lecturer at the Musashino Art University in Tokyo. Since graduating Osaka City University in 1977, Shimoda's work has been presented at over 100 international festivals, conferences and galleries, in more than 30 countries across western and central Europe, North and Central America and throughout Asia.

Shimoda is the Director of NIPAF (Nippon International Performance Art Festival, established in 1993) and has presented the work of over 300 international and Asian performance artists from 45 countries around the world in 2 annual festivals that take place in several cities in Japan. Under Shimoda's direction, NIPAF has become one of the most influential festivals in the global performance art community and is a sought after destination for performance artists from around the world. Shimoda also organizes tours under the umbrella of NIPAF to promote art exchange and dialogue about performance art to the US, Poland, Philippines, Germany and Spain. In 2000, Shimoda was the first Asian artist to receive a prized Bessie Award (New York Dance and Performance). Shimoda's own performance work is a combination of action poetry, performance and movement, employing simple
objects like chopsticks, a chair, a table and his physical body in unique ways.

On March 22, Shimoda will perform his seminal work entitled On The Table, at the Lower Ossington Theatre. Shimoda's performance in Toronto is presented in the context of Fado's on-going thematic series entitled IDea, which invited performance artists from around the world to respond to and create performances that relate to social, cultural or personal identity.

About Fado Performance
Fado is an artist-directed centre established in 1993 to provide a stable, ongoing, supportive forum for creating and presenting performance art created by local, national and international artists at all stages of their careers. Fado is the only artist-run centre in English Canada devoted specifically to this form.
Our activities include presenting performances, artist talks, festivals, residencies, exchanges and workshops, as well as publishing in a variety of formats, including video.

Contact: Shannon Cochrane (Director, Fado Performance)
416-822-3219
mailto:info@performanceart.ca

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14. Linda Sibio, FF Alumn, at Roadside Attraction, CA, May 17, 6:30 pm

For further information: Linda Carmella Sibio 760-362-4071

The Cracked Eggs Interdisciplinary ensemble will be performing their new piece “The Metaphysical Mechanic”
with a visual art show by the same title. The performance will be Saturday May 17th at 6:30PM at The Roadside
Attraction gallery located at 69197 29 Palms Highway (near Indian Cove). There is no cost for admission but we
recommend you buy a visual piece to help The Cracked Eggs or make a donation to their sponsor Bezerk Productions.
“The Metaphysical Mechanic” explores the supernatural and magical elements of working in a garage.
The head mechanic of the garage finds a sweet potato that has psychic powers. The cook comes on stage
mixing up bats and a live Imoo (a bird). When he comes off stage on comes the Valley Girl who is all mixed up
about how she should make a living. Then enters the freak complete with a third eye and psychic powers
of his own – he could be mistaken for a homeless person. The Psycho Waitress comes up serving spaghetti
with bolts and nuts and oil for the drink. Alas! The king has a breakdown in his Rolls Royce and is saved
by the Mechanic and her assistant. The Sweet Potato solves his problem of an early divorce and he goes
on his merry way. The Psycho waitress has a problem of her boyfriend being dead in her car and in the
end the Sweet Potato saves all. That’s all we can tell you for now because the piece is still being developed.

The piece will feature many new artists and some veteran Cracked Eggs players. Ariel Holkesvig will play
the Psycho Waitress and Charlie Ayala will play the chef and the king. We will be introducing Peter Naughton
as the Sweet Potato, Debbie Nyhus as The Metaphysical Mechanic and Annamaria Victoria Loza as the
Valley Girl and Aaron Wager as the Freak and other new characters such as the nurse. Other new players
will be announced at a later date but we’d like to say we have the return of one of the first Cracked Eggs
who was the star of “Queen of the American Way.” We’re very excited that he has returned, as he’s brilliant!

The visual art show will also feature the above “Cracked Eggs” and more interesting artists. The pieces are
constructs made of newspaper, cardboard, wire and nuts and bolts. They explore the theme of the metaphysical
and it’s relationship to ordinary objects. The works have three dimensional elements and multi-dimensional meanings.

The director of the Cracked Eggs is Linda Carmella Sibio. Ms. Sibio is the winner of the 2008 national
visual arts award called The Wynn Newhouse award. She has two upcoming shows in New York City,
and the Akron Art Museum, she has been in shows at Andrew Edlin Gallery with Henry Darger,
Track 16 gallery, United Nations, and the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. Her performance work
has been shown with the Walker Art Center, Creative Time/Franklin Furnace, and The Red Cat Theater
among other venues. She was the 2003 VSA international fellowship artist, has received grants from The
Lannan Foundation and The Rockefeller MAP award.

The Cracked Eggs ensemble has been working together since 2001 and has received support from The
California Arts Council. They have shown their work in many venues in the hi-desert as well as
Highways in Los Angeles. In Los Angeles they received a “GO” by the L.A. Weekly written by
Ron Athey that stated “mad is cool.”

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15. Terry Dame, FF Alumn, at Pioneer Arts Center, MA, opening Mar. 28 and more

Hello Beautiful People,
Electric Junkyard Gamelan is heading out on the road starting March 28th with shows at the Pioneer Arts Center in
Easthampton, Massachusetts (3/28), Time & Space Limited in Hudson, NY (3/29) and Zebulon in Brooklyn (3/30). The
show at Zebulon will be a special one as we are double billing with the great musician and instrument inventor
Bradford Reed, inventor of the famous "Pencilina".
We continue our travels the following weekend going to Langdon Street Cafe in Montpelier, VT (4/4)
Amazing Things Art Center in Framingham, MA (4/5) and our first trip to Portland, ME performing at One
Longfellow Square (4/6).
But wait, there is more... after that we carry on to gigs in PA, OH, AL, TN, NC and WV. PLease check the
full tour schedule below and tell your friends and family in areas we are going to come on out and check us
out. Hope to see you or someone you know real soon.
Peace,
EJG

Touring March 28-april 19
3.28.08 Pioneer Arts Center of Easthampton, Massachusetts
3.29.08 Time & Space Limited Art Center, Hudson, NY
3.30.08 Zebulon- Brooklyn, NY
4.04.08 Langdon Street Cafe-Montpelier, VT
4.05.08 Amazing Things Art Center- Framingham, MA
4.06.08 One Longfellow Square-Portland, ME
4.10.08 Your Inner Vagabond-Pittsburgh, PA
4.11.08 Casa Cantina-Athens, OH
4.12.08 Carabar-Columbus, OH
4.13.08 Flying Monkey Art Center-Huntsville, AL
4.17.08 World Grotto-Knoxville, TN
4.18.08 The Werehouse- Winston-Salem, NC
4.19.08 Earth Day Celebration at Appalachian South Folklife Center -Pipestem, WV

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16. Jed Speare, FF Alumn, in Wire magazine, March 2008

Jed Speare, composer, multidisciplinary artist and Studio Soto director (Boston) is featured in Cross Platform of
the March issue of Wire magazine, Adventures in Modern Music #289. There is also a sound file excerpt from his
recent double album, Sound Works 1982 - 1987, and a gallery of some of his other activities at
http://www.thewire.co.uk/ "Working field and documentary recordings into socially resonant performance
works, this unsung composer is a pioneer of multimedia presentation."
-Wire magazine, 3/08

Jed Speare, Director
617-426-7686
jed@studiosoto.com

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17. Deborah Garwood, Robin Tewes, FF Alumns at Philoctetes, Manhattan, thru April 16

THE PHILOCTETES CENTER
FOR THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDY OF IMAGINATION
AT THE NEW YORK PSYCHOANALYTIC INSTITUTE
247 EAST 82ND STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10028
Susanna Coffey, Self Portrait (kiss), 2001
Jenny Dubnau, Self-Portrait with Angry Face, 2005
Phyllis Herfield, Self-Portrait, 2008
Robin Tewes, I Want to be a Housewife, 2002
Deborah Garwood, Who are I (Qui sont-je?) No. 7, 1997,
2008
Self Reflection:
The True Mirror
WORKS BY
Susanna Coffey, Jenny Dubnau,
Deborah Garwood, Phyllis Herfield,
Haresh Lalvani, Robin Tewes, and John Walter
March 1 – April 16, 2008
ARTISTS’ RECEPTION: Sunday, March 9, 6:o0–7:30pm
Visual artists have always received inspiration from the objective world, filtering their
vision through cortical processes in both hemispheres of the brain. This shuttling between
imaginative and mimetic processes constitutes an ongoing dialogue between the inner and outer worlds of the artist.
While representational art and portraiture often impart the attitude of the artist towards his subject—one has only
to look at Velazquez’s Las Meninas to see how the point of view of the artist surges to the fore—the tradition of
self-portraiture offers the most vivid glimpse into how an artist perceives the self. This act of self-reflection depicts
the intermingling of sight and insight, subject and object. What does the gaze into the mirror reveal about the
artist? For those of us who don’t record our impressions with brush and paint, what does our relationship to the
mirror reveal, how does it impact our imaginative process, and how does it influence our self-conception?
The exhibition Self Reflection: The True Mirror illuminates the genesis of artistic identity, and coincides with the
roundtable The Mirror and the Lamp (part of the Brainwave Festival held in conjunction with the Rubin Museum,
Exit Art, The Graduate Center at CUNY, and the School of Visual Arts), which sets out to explore the neurobiology
of imagination. John Walter’s True Mirror and Haresh Lalvani’s multi-faceted Xurf Mirror 1 introduce immediate,
interactive examples of how we see our own reflection. The artists Susanna Coffey, Jenny Dubnau, Deborah
Garwood, and Phyllis Herfield use portraiture to investigate psychic selfhood, while Robin Tewes depicts the
emotional resonance of mirrors as objects. Self Refelection: The True Mirror may be viewed Monday through
Friday from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm, and by appointment. Please call 646.422.0544 or email info@philoctetes.org
to make arrangements.
Exhibition curated by Hallie Cohen, Chair, Art Department, Marymount Manhattan College.

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18. Nao Bustamante, Nicolás Dumit Estévez, FF Alumns, at El Museo del Barrio, Manhattan, Mar. 19, 6:30-8:30 pm

Voces: Contemporary Actions by Latino Artists

Wednesday March 19, 6:30 -8:30 pm
El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10029
T. (212) 831-7272
http://elmuseo.org/

José Muñoz, Department of Performance Studies, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU moderates this panel featuring
the work of contemporary Latino performance artists Nao Bustamante and Nicolás Dumit Estévez.
Bustamante will perform her piece Given Over to Want an ongoing conversation within the artist’s
performance works that deals with the themes of transformation and desire. Estévez will talk about
his most recent performative work Pleased to Meet You (2007) where he proposed to meet all of the
inhabitants of the town of Calaf, Spain during his visit in 2007 and a similar work that took place in
Peterborough, NH as part of the artists residency at the MacDowell Colony. The performance is documented
in a recent publication that will be presented after the panel.
Admission: Free.
For advance registration e-mail public_programs@elmuseo.org.

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19. Beth B, FF Alumn, at SVA, Manhattan, Mar. 25, 7 pm

BRAINWAVE FESTIVAL NYC
PRESENTS

PSYCHOTIC TO EROTIC

The work of artist and filmmaker
BETH B

IN PERSON

Tuesday, March 25th, 7pm
The School of Visual Arts
209 East 23rd Street
3rd Floor Amphitheater

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20. Eric Brown, FF Member, at Chashama, Manhattan, thru March 23

Accumulation Project: Selections
March 7-23, 2008

Opening Reception:
Friday March 14, 6-9pm

Chashama:
169 Ave. C (10th/11th)
F Train to 2nd Ave. / L Train to 1st Ave.
Thursday-Saturday 1-7pm
Free and open to the public
Contact: 917.669.9786

Chashasma is pleased to present Selections from the Accumulation Project, an exhibition featuring
work from local contributors to the Accumulation Project. Eighteen selected artists from around the
country committed to the year-long challenge of acquiring "accumulates" for the purpose of exhibition.
From September 1, 2005, to September 1 2006, these items amassed. Chosen accumulates ranged from
tangible objects such as unwanted plastic bags and discarded chewing gum to ephemera such as
opinions and wishes. Documentation of each contributor's process and progress was updated monthly
on the Accumulation Project website, www.accumulationproject.org.

The project was originally conceived of by members of Other Leading Brand collective as an exploration
of the roles that time and quantity play in creative practice and as an experiment in approaching art
production as problem solving. "We were curious about how people would transform their attraction to
something into an ordered system or practice, and how their connection or understanding of their subject
might change as a result", says show co-organizer Sam Imperatrice. Co-organizer Eric Brown adds, "We were
curious about who would be interested in participating in and sticking with a project like this. What sort of
personalities would be attracted to this?" While many contributors entered the project with clear ideas as
to how to organize and ultimately exhibit their final collection of accumulates, several participants figured
things out along the way-- their questioning, inspiration, and often their frustrations made public on the
project's website.
In addition to the monthly web documentation, the project's structure called for two gallery exhibitions. One after 3 months of accumulation, which was held in December 2005 at Lunarbase Galery in Williamsburg, and a final exhibition displaying a full year's worth of accumulation held at Art House Productions in Jersey City, October 2007. The current exhibition of selected works at Chashama features six projects by local artists: Paul Baumann, Yellow Things; Irene Chan, Barcodes; Lisa Dahl, Discarded Dreams; Tamara Gubernat, Accumulated Objects; Songyi Kim, Post-It Notes; Sam Imperatrice, Plastic Bags from the Street.

Chashama supports emerging and underrepresented artists by providing one of the most elusive commodities in New York City: space to create. Chashama works with landlords and developers to identify underutilized real estate, which the owner is willing to donate on a short-term, temporary basis, preferring to see underutilized spaces put to good use, looked after and maintained while they are awaiting commercial tenants.
www.chashama.org

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21. Donna Henes, FF Alumn, at South St. Seaport, Manhattan, Mar. 20

EGGSTRA! EGGSTRA! EGGSTRA!
Read all about it:

EGGS ON END: STANDING ON CEREMONY
33rd Annual
World Famous Vernal Equinox Celebration

WITH DONNA HENES, URBAN SHAMAN & FRIENDS

MARCH 20
Wednesday night/Thursday morning

1:00AM EVENT BEGINS
1:48AM EQUINOX MOMENT

South Street Seaport Pier 16 Manhattan

RAIN OR SHINE AS USUAL!

A family friendly event.
Please bring kids, drums, and noisemakers.
Volunteers needed — please call!
FREE

EGGCITING!

EGGCELLENT!!

EGGCEPTIONAL!!!!

EGGSTRAORDINARY!!!

Donna Henes is an internationally renowned urban shaman, eco-ceremonialist, award-winning author,
popular speaker and workshop leader whose joyful celebrations of celestial events have introduced ancient
traditional rituals and contemporary ceremonies to millions of people in more than 100 cities since 1972. She
has published four books, a CD, an acclaimed quarterly journal and writes a column for UPI (United Press
International) Religion and Spirituality Forum. Mama Donna, as she is affectionately called, maintains a
ceremonial center, spirit shop, ritual practice and consultancy in Exotic Brooklyn, NY where she works with
individuals, groups, institutions, municipalities and corporations to create meaningful ceremonies for every
imaginable occasion.

For information about upcoming events and services contact:

Mama Donna's Tea Garden & Healing Haven
PO Box 380403Â
Exotic Brooklyn, New York, NY 11238-0403
Phone: 718/857-1343
Email: CityShaman@aol.com
www.DonnaHenes.net
www.MamaDonnasSpiritShop.com/
www.TheQueenofMySelf.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donna_Henes

Read her blog at:
http://www.myspace.com/queenmamadonnaÂ
http://queenmamadonna.blogspot.comÂ
http://mamadonnahenes.gaia.com/

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22. Ligorano/Reese, Vitaly Komar, Sherrie Levine, at Carriage Trade, Manhattan, thru Mar. 30

The Cult of Personality Portraits and Mass Culture
opening Thursday, February 28, 6-8 pm
show runs: February 28 - March 30, 2008
carriage trade
94 Prince St. 2nd fl New York, NY 10012
open Thursday through Sunday, 1 pm - 6 pm
http://www.carriagetrade.org/

featuring work by:
Yasser Aggour
Jennifer Dalton
Vitaly Komar
Bill Owens
Sherrie Levine
Paul McCarthy
Ligorano/Reese
Muntadas and Reese
Karen Yama
Julia Wachtel
Bill Owens,
"Reagan on TV", 1972
courtey James Cohan Gallery
As the U.S presidential campaign kicks into high gear, the exhibition "The Cult of Personality, Portraits and
Mass Culture" investigates the relationship between celebrity and political personas within the context of
mass media. In focusing on portraiture, a genre which privileges the relative psychological interest of its
subject, this exhibition attempts to locate the manner in which the development of an identity for mass
consumption adopts the traditional viewer/subject relationship, with the result that the viewer tends to
"lose themselves" in the protectiveness or superiority of the featured personality.

Democratic societies, presumed to be free from totalitarian style cults of personality, often employ persuasion,
seduction, and manipulation as part of a phenomenon known as "soft power", a seemingly benign means of
governmental influence on mass media whereby a citizen's position is more or less co-opted through overwhelming
saturation of "preferred" information. The influence on mass sentiment by public relations firms, lobbyists and the
frequently used "anonymous" sources within the news, when taken as a whole, is usually dismissed as conspiratorial.
But when considered in practical terms (success or failure), the effectiveness of a democratic government's use of
mass media to convince the public, for example, that it is in their best interest to go to war, recent history has
proven these methods to be extremely reliable.

Depending on whether the goal is to make the subject appear "familiar" or "in charge", remnants of various
types of portraiture, from the snapshot to the honorific, are usually visible in the fabricated image of a politician
or celebrity. While maintaining a significant relationship to the genre of portraiture, the artwork and archival
material in "The Cult of Personality, Portraits and Mass Culture", represents a broad range of responses to the
creation of identity cults via mass media, offering critical and sometimes ironic commentary on the construction,
dissemination, and consumption of larger than life figures within the public arena.
carriage trade
94 Prince St. 2nd fl New York, NY 10012
contact: Peter Scott / Director
phone: 718.483.0815
email: pscott@carriagetrade.com
http://www.carriagetrade.org/

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23. Anne Flournoy, FF Alumn, now on YOUtube

Hi everybody,
The LOUISE LOG - 3 is finished and posted at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQrWnN60_5A
and The LOUISE LOG - 4 is at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-n4fIICCopw

Please turn up the volume. I hope you like them and if you do, please pass them on.
Thank you,
Anne
http://www.youtube.com/anneflournoy
MICRO-MOVIES

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24. Juana Valdez, FF Alumn, finalist for Cintas Foundation award

Hi
I wanted to share the good news with family and friends now that it is official.
Juana

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum and the Cintas Foundation Announce Seven Finalists for the
2008 Emilio Sanchez Award in the Visual Arts Ray Azcuy, Barbara M. Fuentes, Isaac Maiselman,
Ernesto Oroza, Maria Perez Bravo, Juana Valdes and Ricardo Zulueta are singled out from a field of 54 applicants.
Miami, February xx, 2008 – The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University
and the Cintas Foundation are pleased to announce seven finalists for the 2008 Cintas Foundation Emilio Sanchez Award in the Visual Arts.

The award carries a $15,000 cash prize which is used by the winner to further his or her creative development.
The award is generously funded by the Emilio Sanchez Foundation.In 2005, the Emilio Sanchez Foundation
(www.emiliosanchezfoundation.org) endowed an award in the visual arts, through 2009, in honor of the late
Cuban artist and Cintas Fellow Emilio Sanchez (1989 – 1990). This will be the fourth such award in a series of five
donated by the Emilio Sanchez Foundation. It was first awarded in 2005 to Christian Curiel, in 2006 to Glexis Novoa,
and in 2007 to Gean Moreno. Anne Ellegood, Curator, Hirshorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Washington DC,
Cecilia Fajardo-Hill, Chief Curator, Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation, Miami, Dr. Paula Harper, Art Historian and
critic, Miami, Yasmil Raymond, Assistant Curator, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis comprised the 2008 jury.

"We had an exceptionally competitive field of applicants this year, stated Cintas Foundation president
Hortensia E. Sampedro, "we are appreciative of the talent that the members of the jury brought to their
task this year. We are fortunate to have the services of such an outstanding panel of judges."

The Cintas Foundation Fellowship Program was established in 1963 with funds from the estate of the late
Oscar B. Cintas, (1887 – 1957) a former Cuban ambassador to the United States and a prominent industrialist
and patron of the arts. Since then more than 300 artists have been honored with the Cintas Fellowship. The
only one of its kind in the nation, the program has honored some of the world's most talented Cuban artists,
many in their initial stages who have gone on to play an influential role in the development of their disciplines.
Past visual arts fellows include Carlos Alfonzo, Jose Bedia, Mario Carreno, Teresita Fernández, Anthony Goicolea,
Maria Elena González, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, María Martínez-Cañas, and Mari Rodríguez-Ichaso, Andres Serrano
and many others. A complete history and listings of the fellows may found in the Cintas Foundation web site at
www.cintasfoundation.org. The Selection Program is administered by the Frost Art Museum at Florida International
University and the Cintas Foundation.

For more information, please visit www.cintasfoundation.org or www.frostartmuseum.org

Juana Valdes
http://homepage.mac.com/juanavaldes

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Goings On: posted week of March 3, 2008

CONTENTS:

1. Stanya Kahn, FF Alumn, in The New York Times & Whitney Biennial
2. Susana Cook, FF Alumn, Festival de Teatro Alternativo, Bogota, Colombia, March 7-9
3. Yana Kraeva, FF Alumn, at SUNY Stony Brook, Long Island, thru Mar. 29
4. Terence Gower, FF Alumn, at The Aldrich Musuem, Ridgefield, CT, opening Mar. 9
5. Jenny Polak, FF Alumn, at Pomegranate Gallery, Manhattan, thru Mar. 29, and more
6. Regina Silveira, FF Alumn, at Museo de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia, thru May 11
7. Anita Ponton, FF Alumn, at Centre Cultural de la Merce, Girona, Spain, Mar. 6-8
8. Richard Torchia, Andrea Fraser, David Hammons, Laura Parnes, FF Alumns, at Arcadia Univ., Glendale, PA, opening March 5, 6:30 pm
9. Roberta Allen, FF Alumn, at Happy Ending, Manhattan, Mar. 13, 8 pm
10. Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, FF Alumn, at Vox Populi, Philadelphia, PA, opening Mar. 7
11. Eugene Rodriguez, FF Alumn, at Pawtucket Armory, Rhode Island, and more
12. Lynn Cazabon, FF Alumn, at Montpelier Arts Center, Laurel, MD, Mar. 7-April 25
13. Licio Isolani, FF Alumn, at Pratt, Brooklyn, April 1-2
14. Deborah Garwood, Robin Tewes, FF Alumns, at Philoctetes, Manhattan, thru Apr. 16
15. Liliana Porter, FF Alumn, at Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston, thru April 19
16. Cheri Gaulke, Jerri Allyn, FF Alumns, at The Bronx Museum, thru August 4
17. Tribute to Arlene Raven, and Mona Hatoum, FF Alumns, at NJ City University, Jersey City, NJ, opening March 5
18. Ruth Hardinger, FF Alumn, at Tama, Manhattan, March 6, 7 pm
19. Lady Pink, FF Alumn, at Ad Hoc Art, Brooklyn, opening March 21, 7-10pm
20. Tiffany Ludwig, FF Alumn, at Bronx River Art Center, Bronx, NY, opening March 7

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1. Stanya Kahn, FF Alumn, in Whitney Biennial at The Armory, March 17, 8 pm

Stanya Kahn and Harry Dodge, video works in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. “Can't Swallow It, Can't Spit It Out” airs at the Museum, opening March 6th. A new piece, All Together Now, screens as part of the Whitney Biennial at the Armory on 72nd Street on March 17th at 8pm with Seth Price

AND here is the text of an illustrated NY Times article from March 2, 2008

Art: Unsettling, in a Funny Sort of Way By Jori Finkel

Los Angeles…Once the screen went black and the applause died down, the chorus of questions began. “Where did you get all the dead animal footage?” one viewer asked. Another asked, “Those blue people in the basement, what are they called?”

This was not your usual question-and-answer session after a film screening. The video artists Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn had invited friends and collaborators to their home in the Highland Park neighborhood to see the final cut of their new work, “All Together Now,” which makes its official debut on March 17 in New York.

In the past they have hung a large muslin sheet in their backyard for such screenings. This time, because of rainy weather, these artists decided to take the show inside Ms. Kahn’s studio, a former garage behind the house.

What they screened might be described as their most ambitious work to date, a 26-minute piece that took the better part of nine months to complete. It is also their most disturbing work, dispensing with dialogue and taking place in a burnt-out, post-urban version of Los Angeles.

It opens with Ms. Kahn, face bloodied and hair wild, bludgeoning something in a bush. The “blue people” who soon appear (wearing blue hoods over their faces, Ku Klux Klan style) prove surprisingly chummy, working on tasks like chopping wood together. But the imagery is unsettling enough that one guest that night, Julia Bryan-Wilson, said she was planning to add the work to her syllabus for a course at the University of California, Irvine, on the apocalypse in contemporary art.

This video will be screened at the Park Avenue Armory as part of the off-site programming for the Whitney Biennial. The artists’ 2006 work “Can’t Swallow It, Can’t Spit It Out” will play on a loop at the Whitney Museum of American Art. And “California Video,” an exhibition opening on March 15 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, will include two of their earlier pieces, “Let the Good Times Roll” from 2004 and “Whacker” from 2005.

Yet what promises to be an important year for the couple professionally is also a challenging one personally. After almost 10 years together, including a wedding ceremony and the birth of their son, the two separated last fall. Ms. Dodge, who was born Harriet but now goes by Harry and says she does not identify as “either male or female particularly,” has moved a few blocks away from Ms. Kahn. They said they are “co-parenting” their 3-year-old son and plan to continue collaborating artistically too.

The two first met in 1993 in San Francisco, where they were both part of a low-rent, do-it-yourself, identity-obsessed and queer-inspired performance scene. Ms. Kahn was in a solo show at 848 Community Space, when Ms. Dodge — a co-founder of a cafe-theater called the Bearded Lady — came to see her.

“She was so embodied,” Ms. Dodge said. “One of the things I love is when a performance is so authentic and/or vulnerable that it pierces the skin, the air, the things that mediate between people. It has to do with finding energy in the moment, responding to the right now, the skin of right now, in a way that creates this massive spark or electricity. That was there the first time I saw Stanya perform.”

More recently their goal has been to bring some of that electricity — the energy of live, intimate and improvised performance — into video art, offering an alternative to the slick production values of, say, a Matthew Barney. They began working together after moving to Los Angeles, by way of New York, in 2001.

Their first short, “Winner,” features Ms. Kahn as Lois, a struggling artist who has just won a cruise through a radio call-in contest and is expected to give the cameraman who has tracked her down one good sound bite about how excited she is. Only it emerges that she was actually calling in to request a song, has no intention of taking the cruise and would much rather show him and his audience her lumpy sculptures, stored in the trunk of her car.

“Winner” was shot in a day, with video and sound editing finished within a week. It established the standard division of labor between Ms. Kahn, who typically performs, and Ms. Dodge, who typically serves as the male cameraman, staying out of sight but within earshot in a way that he too becomes a character. Otherwise, the two share usually share responsibilities, from costuming and concept development to video and sound editing.

Like many of their pieces “Winner” was largely improvised. “We had this idea of a guy doing an interview with a lady who kept sculpture in her car,” Ms. Dodge said. “But it wasn’t until we drove up to the parking lot to start shooting that we figured out he was from a radio station.”

That the main character doesn’t know what’s coming next (she can’t, for example, remember the call letters of the radio station) is perceptible, creating moments of real suspense and comic resolution. (Lively editing helps.)

“I don’t mean in any way to compare our work to Andy Kaufman’s,” said Ms. Kahn. “But there’s something Kaufmanesque about this desire to empty yourself out and put anything you want in that space.”

The character of Lois returns in “Let the Good Times Roll.” This time she sits in a hotel room in the desert, telling the loopy story of a sex- and drug-fueled night that culminated in her receiving an Ecstasy enema. Glenn Phillips, a contemporary art curator at the Getty who picked it for the “California Video” survey, said it was the first piece he had seen by these artists. He has been finding ways to show it ever since.

“For starters, it’s just hilarious,” he said. “And I’m also interested in the way that humor for them is the mask for more philosophical ideas”: whether it’s an exploration of mind/body duality, the perils of social conformity, or the struggle of one individual to connect with another.

Or, as Ms. Kahn put it: “Entertainment is a way in for us. Our pieces end up not fully fitting any specific genres, but we have deep affinities to traditional entertainment, from vaudeville songs and dances to sketches, jokes, and stand-up comedy, from narrative filmmaking to live rock ‘n’ roll performances.”

Mr. Phillips has also included their video “Whacker,” which falls somewhere between punk performance and theater of the absurd, in the Getty exhibition. Seven minutes long, it features Ms. Kahn buzzing her way through an overgrown hill with an electric weed cutter. By the time she is done, if she is ever done, new weeds will surely have grown in her wake.

“It’s about the feral — the persistence of the weeds, the wild grass that insists on growing,” Ms. Dodge said.

Ms. Kahn added, “And a woman who is as tenacious as the weeds.”

The artists’ early videos made the rounds at indie film festivals before finding a home in the art world in 2006, when the New York dealer Elizabeth Dee gave them their first solo show. That was the first public screening of “Can’t Swallow It, Can’t Spit It Out,” which the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles included in its exhibition “Eden’s Edge” last year and the Whitney also tapped for the coming Biennial.

Shamim Momin, one of the Biennial’s curators, said she imagined that “Can’t Swallow” could become the “sleeper hit” of the show. “We chose it because it was their most resolved piece,” she said, “in terms of pacing, dialogue, rhythm of the dialogue.” She also said she hopes it will resonate with other pieces in the show that share “a sort of oblique or embedded politics, where the artist is responding to a sociopolitical situation without holding a protest sign.”

The artists have described “Can’t Swallow It,” made during the third year of war in Iraq, as their “portrait of civilian anxiety in a time of war.” Ms. Kahn plays a character they call the Valkyrie who wears a Viking helmet and carries a large foam wedge of Swiss cheese through a blighted Los Angeles landscape. Ms. Dodge is the videographer who follows her around, recording her paranoid imaginings, or memories.

Ms. Dodge said the concept grew out of a fascination with the uses of video today. “We always look at who is taking video, and ask ourselves why. And one function is the citizen watch, the idea that you can shoot something like the Rodney King video and change the world.” So they came up with the idea of a cameraman perched outside a hospital who wants to capture some abuse of political power and finds the Viking character instead.

The artists warned against taking the character too literally. “We haven’t resolved it,” Ms. Kahn said. “Maybe she works at a local theme park or maybe she’s homeless.” There’s also the “hazy possibility,” the artists once wrote, that she is actually a Valkyrie who ushers the spirits of slain heroes to Valhalla.

This kind of ambiguity is amplified in their new work, “All Together Now,” in which the characters’ identities are anything but clear. Formlessness competes with narrative, noise vies with music and there are those obfuscating hoods in blue and white. The blue hoods are blank. The white hoods have crude faces drawn on them with tape.

Ms. Dodge described the hoods, which they have used on occasion before, as part of a larger experiment. “What is a performance without language? Without a face?” she asked.

This direction could be risky, considering the praise critics have lavished on Ms. Kahn’s inventive storytelling in the past. “Harry and Stanya could have kept making narrative works without any lag in their career,” Mr. Phillips said. “But here they are purging themselves of almost everything that people have found interesting — language, a certain kind of expressiveness.”

It’s hard to forget that the artists’ relationship was disintegrating while the piece was being made. “Where I see sadness and darkness in the work, it’s on a personal level for me,” Ms. Kahn said.

But both said they see something hopeful in the video as well.

Ms. Kahn’s character appears to live off the land, whether running river water through a siphon or dragging a plant root through her teeth. She sees foraging as a model for their creative process for this video, which was low on budget and high on resourcefulness. (For the animal scenes they made use of local roadkill.)

And “All Together Now” does offer a particular vision of kinship in the aftermath of society. The hooded people, however voiceless and faceless, work together like families. And you see still-hoodless children — including shots of Ms. Kahn and Ms. Dodge’s son, Lenny — playing in the sand.

“Some people have said this is about a new kind of love,” Ms. Dodge said. “I hope it is about that.”

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2. Susana Cook, FF Alumn, Festival de Teatro Alternativo, Bogota, Colombia, March 7-9

Inseguridades de la Seguridad Nacional (Homeland Insecurities) is a powerful political satire that focuses on parallels between the dictatorship in Argentina and the present U.S. administration. Showing how discourse masks state inflicted terror and how torture is made invisible through the manipulations of language , Susana presents politics as a theater of discourse itself, using humor as a tool for exposing the rationales used by those in power to justify oppressions against minorities.

Written, Directed and Performed by Susana Cook Original Music by Julian Mesri
March 7th at 7-30pm. Teatro Ditirambo
March 9th at 7-30pm. Teatro Acto Latino

For more information: http://www.susanacook.com

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3. Yana Kraeva, FF Alumn, at SUNY Stony Brook, Long Island, thru Mar. 29

Dear Friends,

I would like to invite you to the Thesis Exhibition "What We Wished For" at the Staller Center Art Gallery at Stony Brook University. The show includes the works of four artists who are graduating from Art Department this Spring: Lorena Salcedo-Watson, Amy Marinelli, Ha Na Lee, & Yana K.M.

The show runs through March 29, 2008 Gallery hours: Tuesday - Friday, 12 pm - 4 pm; Saturday, 7 - 9 pm Closed Sunday, Monday, & holidays

Hope to see you there!

Please email me with any questions at yanakr@hotmail.com

Best regards,
Yana

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4. Terence Gower, FF Alumn, at The Aldrich Musuem, Ridgefield, CT, opening Mar. 9

Opening at The Aldrich: Painting the Glass House: Artists Revisit Modern Architecture
Sunday, March 9, 2008; 3 to 5 pm, 2 pm Panel Discussion
Round-Trip Transportation from NYC Available

http://www.aldrichart.org/contact/mail/mailings/PtGHeBlast3.html

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
258 Main Street
Ridgefield, CT 06877
http://www.aldrichart.org

THE ALDRICH PRESENTS PAINTING THE GLASS HOUSE: ARTISTS REVISIT
MODERN ARCHITECTURE

Painting the Glass House: Artists Revisit Modern Architecture—curated by Jessica Hough and Mónica Ramírez-Montagut—will open at The Aldrich on Sunday, March 9, 2008.

The exhibition brings together two-dimensional works (including video) in various media by Alexander Apóstol, Daniel Arsham, Gordon Cheung, David Claerbout, Angela Dufresne, Mark Dziewulski, Christine Erhard, Cyprien Gaillard, Terence Gower, Angelina Gualdoni, Natasha Kissell, Luisa Lambri, Dorit Margreiter, Russell Nachman, Enoc Perez, and Lucy Williams—a collection that explores an interest among emerging artists in architecture of the modern period.

Modern architecture is generally identified with buildings by Le Corbusier, Philip Johnson, Mies van der Rohe, and Frank Lloyd Wright, which represent a period driven by developments in technology, engineering, and the introduction of industrial materials such as iron, steel, concrete, and glass. Architects at this time engaged in a practice that not only incorporated structural innovations, but also encouraged social change.

The artists featured in the exhibition are interested not only in the potential of utopian ideas, but also the sense of a passing idealism that modern architecture now embodies. Hough comments, “The artists are less interested in the built structures themselves and what it might feel like to be inside one, and more interested in the philosophy and idealism they represent. The way in which the buildings signal a possibility of utopia is essential—a future that could have been. Sentimentality runs through much of the work.”

Ramírez-Montagut adds, “This melancholic remembrance comes at a time when great works of modern architecture are at risk due to neglect, deterioration, and demolition. Underlying all the artworks is a feeling of deep admiration for the architects who sought to elevate culture and bring it to the broad masses, yet their sense of failure is also prevalent; the artists’ knowledge of modern architecture’s crisis and demise tints their works with some kind of nostalgia.”

The Aldrich will host an Exhibition Reception on Sunday, March 9, 2008, from 3 to 5 pm. Prior to the opening there will be a 2 pm Panel Discussion: Painting the Glass House: Artists Revisit Modern Architecture, with curators Jessica Hough and Mónica Ramírez-Montagut, along with artists Daniel Arsham, Angela Dufresne, and Terence Gower. The reception is FREE for members. Refreshments will be served. Round-trip transportation from New York City is available; please call the Museum at 203.438.4519 for reservations. Please note that the bus will not arrive in time for the panel discussion. The reception and panel will take place at the Museum located at 258 Main Street, Ridgefield.

A book related to the exhibition is being co-published by The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Mills College Art Museum, and Yale University Press, and is scheduled for a fall 2008 release.

Painting the Glass House: Artists Revisit Modern Architecture has been organized by The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum with the Yale School of Architecture Gallery. Both The Aldrich and Yale will present a portion of the exhibition in their galleries. The exhibition will travel to Mills College Art Museum in California following its Connecticut debut. Exhibition dates: Yale School of Architecture Gallery (New Haven, CT): February 11 to May 9, 2008; The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (Ridgefield, CT): March 9 to July 27, 2008; Mills College Art Museum (Oakland, CA): January 14 to March 22, 2009.

ALSO OPENING AT THE ALDRICH ON SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2008:

Halsey Burgund: ROUND (on view through July 27, 2008); Gary Panter: Daydream Trap (on view through August 31, 2008); Ester Partegàs: The Invisible (on view through August 10, 2008).

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:
The Aldrich is one of the few non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States. Founded on Ridgefield’s historic Main Street in 1964, the Museum enjoys the curatorial independence of an alternative space while maintaining the registrarial and art-handling standards of a national institution. Exhibitions feature work by emerging and mid-career artists, and education programs help adults and children to connect to today’s world through contemporary art. The Museum is located at 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. All exhibitions and programs are handicapped accessible. Regular Museum hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 12:00 noon to 5:00 pm. For more information call 203.438.4519.

Contact: Pamela Ruggio
Phone: 203.438.4519
Email: pruggio@aldrichart.org

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5. Jenny Polak, FF Alumn, at Pomegranate Gallery, Manhattan, thru Mar. 29, and more

Dear Friends: my work is in 2 new shows – one opening tonight at the Pomegranate Gallery in Greene st. SoHo: the other on San Antonio TX. Other shows are still ongoing (info at jennypolak.com) at Rutgers’ (Newark) Paul Robeson Gallery/NJIT and the Tompkins Public Library in Ithaca NY. I hope you can have a look..

Best,Jenny Polak
http://www.jennypolak.com

ELIGIBLE TRAFFIC
MARCH 7 - APRIL 5, 2008
OPENING RECEPTION
Friday March 7, 5-7pm
at the Trinity University Art Gallery, San Antonio, TX

The exhibition features a group of artists including: David Avalos, Louis Hock, & Elizabeth Sisco, William Betts, Margarita Cabrera, Ann Carlson & Mary Ellen Strom, Pedro Lasch, Yoshua Okon, Jenny Polak, Lordy Rodriguez, and Gary Sweeney

Eligible Traffic is a term that refers to a designation employed by the Department of Defense in which the law regulates the flow of individuals. “Eligible Traffic” addresses the subject of the undocumented immigrant and the legal formalities that differentiate the permitted from the excluded, responding to the current geo-political conflict involving the US/Mexico border.

An experiment in curatorial collaboration, “Eligible Traffic” is a collaboration between the students from Trinity University’s Gallery Practicum seminar and guest curator, NYC-based artist, Steven Lam. Through personal interaction with artists and scholars, the seminar utilizes the exhibition format as a hand-on pedagogical tool addressing topical concerns through the lens of artistic practice.

PIECE PROCESS: Every Wall Shall Fall

Through March 29, 2008
Pomegranate Gallery (supported in part by the Oded Halahmy Foundation)
133 Greene Street
New York NY 10012
212-260-4014
www.pomgallery.com <http://www.pomgallery.com/>

Artists:

Granite Amit, Doris Bittar, Rajie Cook, Abdelali Dahrouch, Joyce Dallal, Hanah Diab, Michele Feder-Nadoff, John Halaka, Kanaan Kanaan, John Pitman-Weber, Jenny Polak, Amie Potsic

Also on view: contemporary Iraqi art from the Gallery collection.

PIECE PROCESS STATEMENT

Formed in 2002, Piece Process is a group of artists, Israeli and Palestinian, Jewish and Arab, men and women, committed to exhibiting together in order to explore the Israel-Palestine conflict and the possibility of peace. Exhibiting in the US, we engage this country’s deeply inequitable involvement in the conflict and our personal ties to it. We share the belief that all co-existence must be based on the principles of human rights and equality. Piece Process underlines the internal processes we undergo; it strengthens our artistic voices, and shows our personal narratives as inextricably intertwined. The diverse work of these artists (through varied media and visual vocabularies) allows Piece Process to bring about, in the spectator’s mind, a broader conceptualization of humans in situations of conflict and a deeper understanding of coexistence.

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6. Regina Silveira, FF Alumn, at Museo de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia, thru May 11

"Sombra Luminosa" curated by José Roca, at the Museo de Antioquia, in Medellin.
From February 21st to May 11, 2008.

"Sombra Luminosa" com curadoria de José Roca, no Museo de Antioquia, Medellin.
21 de fevereiro a 11 de maio, 2008.

Regina Silveira

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7. Anita Ponton, FF Alumn, at Centre Cultural de la Merce, Girona, Spain, Mar. 6-8

Hello everyone

Below are some details of a new show I am taking part in. It is an annual celebration for Women's Day and features some fabulous artists!

Marking International Womens Day 2008, Gresol present SiNERGiA a special performance event featuring 15 international performance artists. Work will be shown over a 3 day period (6-8th March 2008) in the Centre Cultural de la Merce in the town of Girona, Spain

Participating artists include:

Anita Ponton
Denys Blacker
Fiona Wright
Sandra Johnson
Robin Poitras
Nieves Correa
Isabel Leon
Elvira Santamaria
Maria Cosmos
Anet van Elzen
Danielle van Vree
Leanne Lloyd
Gresolart.com

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8. Richard Torchia, Andrea Fraser, David Hammons, Laura Parnes, FF Alumns, at Arcadia Univ., Glendale, PA, opening March 5, 6:30 pm

I hope you can join us for "Air Kissing: An Exhibition of Contemporary Art about the Art World" opening this Wednesday, March 5, at 6:30 PM with a panel discussion in Arcadia's Little Theatre followed by a public reception.

http://gargoyle.arcadia.edu/gallery/07-08/air-kissing.htm

Curated by Sasha Archibald for Momenta Art (Brooklyn), "Air Kissing" addresses some legitimate grievances about the art world in engaging and entertaining ways. The panel discussion prior to the reception promises to be interesting.

I look forward to seeing you there if you're able to attend.

Thank you. RT

Air Kissing: An Exhibition of Contemporary Art about the Art World

March 5 – April 20

Participating artists: Alex Bag, Conrad Bakker, Brainstormers, BANK, Jennifer Dalton, Elmgreen & Dragset with Lizette Kabré, Andrea Fraser & Jeff Preiss, David Hammons, Jason Irwin, Christian Jankowski, Kalup Linzy, Lee Lozano, James Mills, Elena Nemkova, Carl Pope, William Powhida, William Bryan Purcell, Mira Schor, and Amanda Trager.

Curated by Sasha Archibald.

OPENING EVENT

March 5 at 6:30 p.m, Arcadia University Theatre, Spruance Fine Arts Center. Panel discussion with exhibition curator Sasha Archibald and participating artists James Mills, William Powhida, Mira Schor, and Momenta Art co-director and artist Laura Parnes. Opening reception to follow immediately afterward in the gallery.

About the Exhibition

Featuring 35 works in diverse media by 22 regional and international artists, artist teams and collectives, the show explores the double-bind faced by artists navigating their desire to work (and succeed) in a world they hold in low regard.

Using self-deprecation, humor, sharp criticism, and a deliberate mix of high culture with low, the artists in “Air Kissing” give voice to a number of legitimate grievances about the art world. Works in the exhibition by Andrea Fraser & Jeff Preiss, Elena Nemkova, and William Powhida take up artists' relationships with collectors while the London-based collective BANK use their unsolicited “Fax-Bak” service to correct the art-babble clichés, grammatical errors, and exaggerated claims of press-releases issued by commercial galleries. Mira Schor's paintings compulsively document the lack of studio time for making work; Alex Bag's video parodies the plight of young art students; and Kalup Linzy's overblown soap opera spoof uses drag to examine the emotional drama of desiring art world success. Conrad Bakker and William Bryan Purcell speak to the stratification of institutional funding, particularly the fact that struggling non-profit galleries often rely on donations from emerging artists no more flush than the gallery. The work of Carl Pope and Amanda Trager addresses the phenomena of art world fame, while the graphs and charts developed by Jennifer Dalton and the Brainstormers (building on research begun by the Guerilla Girls 20 years ago), respectively create a statistical portrait of New York artists and make explicit the continuing gender inequities manifest by gallery exhibitions. Commercial signage by James Mills bespeaks the frenzied art market, as does Jason Irwin's minimalist cube turned racecar, as well as the behind-the-scenes work of art handlers. David Hammons takes a canonical monograph on Duchamp and rebinds it as the Bible, suggesting (among other things) the art world's predilection for accepted dictums. Lizette Kabré's photographs of the opening celebrations of Elmgreen & Dragset's Prada Marfa project—a Prada boutique in the Texas desert—poignantly capture the partygoers' isolation. Lastly, Christian Jankowski records Italian television-based fortune-tellers responding to questions about his forthcoming project for the Venice Biennale. The resulting work—comprised of the televised dialogues between Jankowski and the card-readers—reveals a seemingly irreconcilable gap between the earnest prophecies offered by professional mystics and the strategies of contemporary artists.

The insularity addressed by these and other works in the show highlight the art world's biggest problem, a handicap that leaves it not only embarrassingly homogeneous, but unaware of its own narrow confines. All irony aside, what's to be done? The painter and conceptual artist Lee Lozano took this question seriously, beginning an art world boycott at the height of her fame in the late 60s that she continued for nearly thirty years. Lozano described the strike as "the hardest work I have ever done." As the works in “Air Kissing” attest, staying in the New York art world isn't easy either.

Sasha Archibald is a Brooklyn-based writer and curator. “Air Kissing” was originally presented in November-December 2007 at Momenta Art (Brooklyn), and has been expanded for its installation at Arcadia. First established in Philadelphia in 1986 by Eric Heist, Donna Czapiga and James Mills, Momenta Art is an artist-run charitable institution that works to promote emerging and under-represented artists. In 1992, under the direction of Heist and Laura Parnes, it relocated to New York City and began presenting exhibitions in a variety of temporary venues in Manhattan. In March of 1995 Momenta Art reopened in a permanent exhibition space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

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9. Roberta Allen, FF Alumn, at Happy Ending, Manhattan, Mar. 13, 8 pm

I will read Thursday, March 13, 8 PM, Free in the Reading Series Mr. Beller's Neighborhood

at Happy Ending
302 Broome St.
at the intersection of Broome St. & Forsyth St.

212 334-9676

Also reading: Dr. Julia Nevarez, environmental psychologist,
Michele Carlo, writer

Hope you can come!

Best,

Roberta
robertaallen.com

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10. Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, FF Alumn, at Vox Populi, Philadelphia, PA, opening Mar. 7

On Transmitting Ideology
an installation by Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga Vox Populi

319 A. North 11th Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia PA. 19107 March 7 – March 30, 2008 Opening Reception: Friday, March 7th, 6-10pm

As we walk the streets our bodies pierce magnetic fields. On Transmitting Ideology will present an installation of several wooden guns outfitted with radios broadcasting declarations on freedom and transformation in our society. By manipulating historical and contemporary speeches that have targeted mass audiences Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga presents a poignant critique on the construction of consciousness through the rhetoric of ideology and the refrain of leadership. The radio transmissions framed in hand-crafted wooden AK47s and Uzis point to the power that mass media wields in the dissemination of information.

The exhibition will also feature two recent video commissions that question the outcome of popular notions of freedom, liberty and the power of capital. Carreta Nagua, Siglo 21 (2007) is an animation that tells a tale of immigration, aging and cultural and familial loss. Two aging television super heroes, Ultraman and El Chapulin Colorado take the voices of the artist's parents as they look back upon their lives and consider the price of immigration. El Rito Apasionado (2007) takes place in a hotel room where three Guevarrian Neo-Marxist Latino Terror Revolutionaries from Cuba, Nicaragua and Mexico gather to prepare an act against the history of U.S. intervention.

Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga was born of immigrant parents and grew up between Nicaragua and San Francisco and holds degrees from UC Berkeley and Carnegie Mellon University. His work has been presented around the world most recently at the House of World Culture, Berlin; Laboratorio Art-Alameda, Mexico City; the National Center for Contemporary Art, St.

Petersburg, Russia; the New Museum and Momenta Art in New York City.

On Transmitting Ideology will be open to the public Wednesday through Sunday noon – 6pm. For more information please contact Vox Populi: 215

238 1236; http://www.voxpopuligallery.org/

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11. Eugene Rodriguez, FF Alumn, at Pawtucket Armory, Rhode Island, and more

Pawtucket Armory/Arts Exchange
172 Exchange St.
Pawtucket, Rhode Island

For more information
www.reconnectus.org

And

"Experiencing the War in Iraq"
March 6-30, 2008 @Machines with Magnets
400 Main St.

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12. Lynn Cazabon, FF Alumn, at Montpelier Arts Center, Laurel, MD, Mar. 7-April 25

LYNN CAZABON

DILUVIAN

March 7 - April 25

opening reception: Sunday, March 9, 2-4pm

Montpelier Arts Center

Library Gallery
9652 Muirkirk Road
Laurel, MD 20708
301-953-1993

open every day, 10am-5pm
www.pgparks.com

directions from Baltimore: MD-295 S (towards D.C.) take exit for MD-197 (Laurel/Bowie) turn right onto MD-197 Laurel Bowie Road turn left on Muirkirk Rd, center is on right

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13. Licio Isolani, FF Alumn, at Pratt, Brooklyn, April 1-2

INVITED SPEAKERS

Bernhard Blumich
RWTH University of Aachen, Germany
Mauro Bacci

Institute of Applied Physics, Nello Carrara
Florence, Italy
Frima Fox Hofrichter
Chair History of Art and Design, Pratt

Diana Gisolfi
Director of Pratt in Venice,
History of Art and Design, Pratt

Licio Isolani
Fine Arts, Pratt

Deborah Schorsch
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Lisa Bruno
The Brooklyn Museum of Art

Silvia Centeno
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Julie Arsoroglu
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Mary Oey
The Morgan Library

Science & Artists’ Materials, Techniques and Conservation
2nd Science & Art and Symposium at Pratt Institute

April 1st and 2nd , 10 am, ARC E2
Bronze casting workshop

Organized by the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Department of Math & Science

For more information and RSVP

Contact Prof. Eleonora Del Federico
edelfede@pratt.edu
718-636-3764

Thanks to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Brystol Myers Squibb Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation

April 2nd 10:00 am, Room ARC E2

“Science and Artists’ Materials, Techniques and Conservation”

10:00 am

Introduction: Prof. Eleonora Del Federico

10: 10 am.

"What Lies Beneath: Technical Studies of Some 17th-Century Dutch and Flemish Paintings“ Prof. Frima Fox Hofrichter, Chair, History of Art and Design. 10: 35 am.

"Conservation and Recreation: Veronese's Cana from Palladio's Refectory at San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice" Prof. Diana Gisolfi, History of Art and Design and Director of Pratt In Venice.

11 am- 11:15 am Coffee break

11:15 am

"Conserving Egyptian Funerary Materials, How Science Informs Conservation“ Lisa Bruno, Conservation Department, The Brooklyn Museum of Art 11:45 am

“Seeing Meaning in Manufacture--Bronze Statuary from Ancient Egypt" Deborah Schorsch, Department of Objects Conservation, The Metropolitan Museum of Art 12:10 am -2:30 pm-

Lunch break

12:10 pm- 4 pm

Bronze Casting Demonstration, The Metal Shop (Chemistry Building, 3rd Floor

Prof. Licio Isolani, Sculpture, Pratt Institute

2:30 pm.

“Consolidatrion methods for Medieval Illuminated Manuscripts” Mary Oey, Paper Conservation, the Morgan Library

2:55 pm

"What does antibody technology tell us about artists' materials?”Dr. Julie Arasoglu, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

3:20 – 3:35 pm Coffee Break

3:35 pm ”Non invasive characterization of deterioration processes in daguerreotypes” Dr. Silvia Centeno, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

4.05 pm

“Lapis lazuli: an old, but not yet fully understood pigment" Dr. Mauro Bacci, head of research, Istituto di Fisica Applicata "Nello Carrara" - IFAC-CNR

Thanks to the Alfred P. Sloan foundation, tthe Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and the Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation

April 2nd, 10: 00 am Room: ARC E2

“Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Art and Mummies”

10 am. “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR, Art and Mummies”, Prof. Bernhard Blϋmich, RTWH Aachen University

Prof. Bernhard Blϋmich Macromolecular
Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University,
Germany, and developer of the NMR MOUSE.

Prof. Blϋmich will also conduct an NMR

MOUSE tutorial at 12pm in ARC D4

11:00 am. “Collaborative research projects between Pratt, NYU and The Metropolitan Museum of Art”

Prof. Eleonora Del Federico, Pratt Institute, Prof. Alexej Jerschow, New York University and Dr. Silvia Centeno, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and

11:10 am “NMR of Ultramarine Blue and Lapis Lazuli”

Jacob Newman, Chemistry Department, New York University

11:30 am. “Stains on works on paper. Latest results on the NMR studies”

Victoria Russell, Chemistry Department, New York University

11:45 am- Coffee break

12 pm. “How does the NMR MOUSE work?”

NMR MOUSE tutorial

Prof. Berhard Blumich. Chemistry and Art Lab, ARC Building D4

For information and Registration please contact Eleonora Del Federico: edelfede@pratt.edu or the

Department of Mathematics and Science at 718-636-3764

Metal Shop Chemistry Builiding 3rd Floor

Directions to campus: http://www.pratt.edu/campus/brooklyn_campus#

ARC-D4 (Lower Level) Chemistry and Art Lab ARC ARC E-2 (Lower Level)

Digital Arts Department, Main Entrance Subway station

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14. Deborah Garwood, Robin Tewes, FF Alumns, at Philoctetes, Manhattan, thru Apr. 16

THE PHILOCTETES CENTER
FOR THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDY OF IMAGINATION
AT THE NEW YORK PSYCHOANALYTIC INSTITUTE
247 EAST 82ND STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10028
Susanna Coffey, Self Portrait (kiss), 2001
Jenny Dubnau, Self-Portrait with Angry Face, 2005
Phyllis Herfield, Self-Portrait, 2008
Robin Tewes, I Want to be a Housewife, 2002
Deborah Garwood, Who are I (Qui sont-je?) No. 7, 1997,2008

Self Reflection: The True Mirror

WORKS BY

Susanna Coffey, Jenny Dubnau, Deborah Garwood, Phyllis Herfield, Haresh Lalvani, Robin Tewes, and John Walter

March 1 – April 16, 2008

ARTISTS’ RECEPTION: Saturday, March 15, 5:30–7:00pm

Visual artists have always received inspiration from the objective world, filtering their vision through cortical processes in both hemispheres of the brain. This shuttling between imaginative and mimetic processes constitutes an ongoing dialogue between the inner and outer worlds of the artist. While representational art and portraiture often impart the attitude of the artist towards his subject—one has only to look at Velazquez’s Las Meninas to see how the point of view of the artist surges to the fore—the tradition of self-portraiture offers the most vivid glimpse into how an artist perceives the self. This act of self-reflection depicts the intermingling of sight and insight, subject and object. What does the gaze into the mirror reveal about the artist? For those of us who don’t record our impressions with brush and paint, what does our relationship to the mirror reveal, how does it impact our imaginative process, and how does it influence our self-conception? The exhibition Self Reflection: The True Mirror illuminates the genesis of artistic identity, and coincides with the roundtable The Mirror and the Lamp (part of the Brainwave Festival held in conjunction with the Rubin Museum, Exit Art, The Graduate Center at CUNY, and the School of Visual Arts), which sets out to explore the neurobiology of imagination. John Walter’s true mirror and Haresh Lalvani’s multi-faceted Infinity Cubed introduce immediate, interactive examples of how we see our own reflection. The artists Susanna Coffey, Jenny Dubnau, Deborah Garwood, and Phyllis Herfield use portraiture to investigate psychic selfhood, while Robin Tewes depicts the emotional resonance of mirrors as objects. Self Reflection: The True Mirror may be viewed Monday through Friday from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm, and by appointment. Please call 646.422.0544 or email info@philoctetes.org

to make arrangements.

Exhibition curated by Hallie Cohen, Chair, Art Department, Marymount Manhattan College.

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15. Liliana Porter, FF Alumn, at Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston, thru April 19

Barbara Krakow Gallery announces our new exhibition: LILIANA PORTER, through April 19, 2008

Greetings:Barbara Krakow Gallery is pleased to announce our new exhibition:

LILIANA PORTER
thru 19 April, 2008

Liliana Porter's work has strongly approached the literal space, impelled, maybe, by the characteristic bareness and austerity of an aesthetic shaped over many years. Her works approach the literal, the obsessively literal, cautiously leaving behind the literary. In other words, Porter does not call things by their names: she creates a space in which things are their own name. Everything is either object or word, and based on this premise, she articulates a rhetoric and a poetic where language is no more than a constant impossibility and a closeness to something mysterious and impenetrable.

In works from the late 70s Porter explored the idea of writing with objects and/ or drawings of objects, graciously separated by punctuation signs as if the image were a list, pure text presented to be visually devoured. In more recent works, beyond the travesty of a syntax, Porter insists on presenting animated objects, condensing the focus in the specifics of the thing she literalizes, demanding 'from here', from this side of fiction, to continue the game of representation. In this way, each one does what they need to do, or, what they did before being forever fixed on an image: designers design and sweepers sweep, accusers accuse, and a melancholic gazes dismally at a spot on the wall.

Each thing is also a way of naming that thing. By being presented and re-presented in a scene, the figures acquire the density of a metaphor and, in this way, also become figures of the language. These things represent thought strategies, artilleries of the imagination that bring them to a rhetoric ˆ and its metonymic games that exchange parts for the whole in all parts- than to the prolonged breath of a syntax.

In this way Porter raises a rhetorical thought from the literal, a writing style many times understood as literary. And, although, without a doubt, authors such as Borges and Carroll have informed their artistic practices, Porter's works resist being a mere illustration of literary strategies used to prop up fiction. Porter does, however, play with writings, with objects summoned in a space to the point of turning them into ideograms, with sign-scrawls traced on the wall by an idle person.

It is a writing that is a travesty and is merciless with its own scribe, who seems to be its clearer sign. It is not reversible, but it is logical: cause and consequence, before and after are open elements now in the scene. And by opening up, they disarrange, they align or change places, discarding the tyrannical relationship that preceded them. Nonetheless, they resist chaos. Instead, they celebrate the mystery.

José Luis Blondet

LILIANA PORTER was born in Buenos Aires in 1941.

In 1954 she began her studies at the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes Manuel Belgrano. (National School of Fine Arts Manuel Belgrano) From 1958 to 1961 she lived with her family in Mexico City, Mexico. At the Universidad Iberoamericana of that city she studied with German artist Mathias Georitz and specialized in engraving techniques with Colombian artist Guillermo Silva Santamaría. Upon her return to Buenos Aires, she continued her training with Fernando López Anaya and Ana María Moncalvo. In 1964 she moved to New York. She worked at the Pratt Graphic Art Center and created the New York Graphic Workshop together with two artists: the Uruguayan Luis Camnitzer and the Venezuelan José Guillermo Castillo. In 1977 she co-founded the Studio Camnitzer-Porter, in Lucca, Italy, where she was also an engraving instructor. In 1980 she received a Guggenheim Fellowship. Since then, she has been granted seven research Fellowships in photography, video and multimedia at the City University of New York (PSC-CUNY). In 1991, the Bronx Museum in New York, presented a retrospective exhibition of her work and achievements.

Beyond coming to see the show in person, all the works in the exhibition are viewable on our website: http://www.barbarakrakowgallery.com/exhibition/current.php

Please feel free to visit, email or call for further information!

Andrew Witkin, Director
Barbara Krakow Gallery
10 Newbury Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02116

P - 617 262 4490
F - 617 262 8971
E - awitkin@barbarakrakowgallery.com
W - www.barbarakrakowgallery.com

Open Tuesday - Saturday 10 - 5:30

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16. Cheri Gaulke, Jerri Allyn, FF Alumns, at The Bronx Museum, thru August 4

I am excited to announce my participation in this exhibition in New York. The work I am showing includes documentation from two collaborative groups I co-founded, Feminist Art Workers (1976-81) and Sisters Of Survival (1981-85). With the WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution exhibition now in New York (at PS1), it is important to remember that collaboration was also a significant aspect of the feminist art movement. It was in southern California where this work was especially innovated. I am proud to be a part of that history and am delighted that it is beginning to be recognized in this exhibition. For the exhibition, I edited two videos that document FAW and SOS. It was exciting to get together with my collaborators from times past and dig through our archives, select and scan photos, write narration about the work, and even re-stage some performance imagery. Working together was like old times but better. We've all mellowed and, with age and experience, know each other and ourselves so well that we could fall into a productive groove. It was lots of work but I'm really proud of the results. We may even post the two videos on youtube sometime soon. I'd like to especially acknowledge Laurel Klick (my partner in editing the FAW video) and Jerri Allyn, Anne Gauldin and Sue Maberry (my partners in producing the SOS video).

Making It Together:

Women's Collaborative Art + Community

Making It Together explores an important chapter in recent history when women artists, inspired by the 1970s Feminist Movement, worked collectively in new ways to engage communities and address social issues.

Guest curator: Carey Lovelace

at The Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10456

through August 4, 2008

Go to the museum website and see a picture of me in my red nun’s habit as anti-nuclear performance art group, Sisters Of Survival, perform our Public Action in Covent Garden, London, in 1983.

http://www.bronxmuseum.org/exhibitions/upcoming.html

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17. Tribute to Arlene Raven, and Mona Hatoum, FF Alumns, at NJ City University, Jersey City, NJ, opening March 5

Please come and join us for the March 5 opening for two women artists exhibitions at NJCU Galleries.

Please note that two exhibitions will open on March 5, 2008 (We will start the reception at the Visual Arts Gallery 5- 6:30 and make a tour to Hepburn Hall to view the Sustaining Vision exhibition around 6:30 - 8).

March – April 2008 program at NJCU Galleries:
The Harold B. Lemmerman Gallery (Hepburn Hall 323):

For images, see http://www.njcu.edu/dept/art/galleries/upcoming_exhibitions_1.asp

Sustaining Vision: A Tribute to Arlene Raven

March 5 – April 16, 2008

Artist reception: March 5, 5 – 8 p.m. (please note the exhibition in the other gallery opens simultaneously.) Artists Panel: March 18, 5:30 – 7 p.m. at Gothic Lounge (Hepburn Hall 202) followed by a reception at the gallery

In tribute to the late art critic Arlene Raven (1944-2006), eight artists—Elaine Angelopoulos, Donna Maria de Creeft, Janet Goldner, Amanda Guest, Judy Hoffman, Kerry Kehoe, Julie McConnell, and Joanne Ungar—have collaborated to create a multimedia art exhibition to celebrate her life and legacy. Over a decade ago, these artists met more in Raven's writing workshops, called "Writing for Artists," to develop writing skills to express their artistic concepts and processes. "Sustaining Vision" refers to Raven's emphasis on promoting one's creativity and nurturing it—respecting it as it might evolve, develop, or change. The artists came to trust themselves as they learned to trust each other using this approach. The work shown here encompasses many media, but all share some interesting convergences, making for a cohesive whole.

Curatorial consultant: Anne Swartz

The Visual Arts Gallery (100 Culver Avenue): For images, see http://www.njcu.edu/dept/art/galleries/upcoming_exhibitions_2.asp

Mother Cuts: Experiments in Film and Video
March 5 - Apr 11, 2008

Opening reception, March 5, 5 -8 p.m.

Introduction of the exhibition by guest curator Siona Wilson & artist talk by Sarah Pucill at 5:30 p.m.

This exhibition will present four different approaches to the idea of maternal distance through exciting and moving works in film and video. Each artist explores very different kinds of social, geographic, political, and economic determinations for the situation of separation, or 'mother cut,' that they present. Mona Hatoum and Mieke Bal ask us to consider questions of economic and political migration and the emotional pangs of longing that result, from both sides of the generational divide. While Sarah Pucill and Mary Kelly touch lightly upon the pleasures of maternal embodiment as a model for a different kind of imagined spectatorship. But all examples present carefully staged experiments in the physical and ethical relationship between camera and subject. The effects of the different kinds of media – 8mm, video, 16mm film, and videoed photography –are foregrounded in all of the works, as is the presence or absence of imagined and actual spectators.

Guest curator: Siona Wilson

Both exhibitions proudly participate in the national initiative, The Feminist Art Project (http://feministartproject.rutgers.edu/) and the Women's History Month Program of NJCU.

Gallery hours for both: Monday- Friday, 11a.m. - 5 p.m. and by appointment

For directions by public transportations and car, visit http://www.njcu.edu/dept/art/galleries/upcoming_exhibitions_1.asp

New Jersey City University Galleries
100 Culver Avenue
Jersey City, NJ 07305
T: 201-200-3246
gallery@njcu.edu
http://www.njcu.edu/dept/art/galleries

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18. Ruth Hardinger, FF Alumn, at Tama, Manhattan, March 6, 7 pm

Please join us

March 6, at 7 PM

for a Conversation with Ruth Hardinger and Stephen Westfall and a Musical Conversation with Jon Gibson
during Hardinger's exhibition

Envoys

Sculpture and Water Color on Paper
At Tama
5 Harrison Street
New York City
(between Hudson and Greenwich St.)
212-566-7030

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19. Lady Pink, FF Alumn, at Ad Hoc Art, Brooklyn, opening March 21, 7-10pm

“Pink / Aiko: Brick Ladies of NYC” opens at Ad Hoc Art on March 21st from 7-10 pm and continues thru April 20. for details please visit adhocart.org

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20. Tiffany Ludwig, FF Alumn, at Bronx River Art Center, Bronx, NY, opening March 7

Bronx River Art Center presents

Trappings: Stories of Women, Power & Clothing
By Two Girls Working: Tiffany Ludwig and Renee Piechocki
Opening reception March 7, 6-9 pm
Continues thru April 12, 2008

For full information please visit twogirlsworking.com and/or bronxriverart.org


Goings On is compiled weekly by Harley Spiller

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Goings On is compiled weekly by Harley Spiller


Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc.
80 Arts - The James E. Davis Arts Building
80 Hanson Place #301
Brooklyn NY 11217-1506 U.S.A.
Tel: 718-398-7255
Fax: 718-398-7256
http://www.franklinfurnace.org
mail@franklinfurnace.org

Martha Wilson, Founding Director
Michael Katchen, Senior Archivist
Harley Spiller, Administrator
Elise Kermani, Program Coordinator
Susie Tofte, Project Cataloguer
Judith L. Woodward, Financial Manager