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ABOUT GOINGS ON: How to subscribe and submit listings

Goings On: posted week of December 20, 2007

CONTENTS:
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1. Halona Hilbertz, FF Alumn, at Galapagos, Brooklyn, TONIGHT, 10 pm
2. Kriota Willberg, Todd Alcott, FF Alumns, at Lincoln Center, Jan 5-6, 2008
3. Yong Soon Min, FF Alumn, in transPOP, Korea
4. Jerome Covington, FF Alumn, on Fox5 TV, Dec 22, 12:30 am
5. Marina Abramovic, FF Alumn, in Artinfo, now online
6. Shelagh Keeley, FF Alumn, in the National Post, Toronto, online
7. Paul Henry Ramirez at Caren Golden – Art in America, December, 2007
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1. Halona Hilbertz, FF Alumn, at Galapagos, Brooklyn, TONIGHT, 10 pm

Ho ho ho!

This Thursday, Dec. 20 (doors at 10) at
GALAPAGOS, 70 North 6th Street, Brooklyn:

Sikamore Rooney
FULL TANK
Organized Sports
+ DJ Ness

Should be a fun lineup. And we promise we won't go all christmassy on your ass.

x
halona

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2. Kriota Willberg, Todd Alcott, FF Alumns, at Lincoln Center, Jan 5-6, 2008

Hello Everyone!

Great news! The Bentfootes the live show has been transformed into The Bentfootes the movie!

A mockumentary melange of Spinal Tap and Ken Burns, The Bentfootes is a loving skewering of 200 years of American dance. Jim Raritan (James Urbaniak) attempts to memorialize a quasi-illustrious family of dancers who managed to keep their demented muse alive through two centuries of American history.

Join us for the premiere of the film at the Dance On Camera Festival
at Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater
January 5, 2008 at 4pm
January 6, 2008 at 8:30pm
Lincoln Center Plaza, 165 West 65th Street
Box office (212) 496-3809
Tickets: $11, $7 senior/student/members
More info: filmlinc.com, dancefilms.org, duramater.org

Hope to see you at Lincoln Center!
Best,
Kriota Willberg and Todd Alcott

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3. Yong Soon Min, FF Alumn, in transPOP, Korea

transPOP: Korea Vietnam Remix introduces a dynamic mix of sixteen critically acclaimed artists from Korea, Vietnam, and the United States, signaling an unprecedented engagement with the rich historic and contemporary linkages between Korea and Vietnam. The featured artworks variously engage interconnections between the two countries, including the intersections of history, trauma, and contemporary popular culture. The interactions between Vietnam and Korea span centuries but the exhibition focus lies in their shared history of highly accelerated modernization process with militarized roots and the Cold War. During the American War in Vietnam, the Republic of Korea was the second largest foreign military and economic presence in Vietnam behind the United States, with over 300,000 combat forces and approximately 24,000 skilled workers in exchange for substantial U.S. aid. The financial boon from the involvement in the war played a catalytic role in the development of Korea, laying the foundation for what is now the world's 12th largest economy. The legacy of the Cold Wars is evident in the large Korean and Vietnamese diasporic communities in the U.S. In Vietnam, this accelerated modernity is evident in the breakneck speed of current economic development, as well as its entry into the World Trade Organization.

Since the late nineties, Vietnam and Korea has witnessed a significant development of popular culture, fostering greater cultural proximity locally and abroad. A global phenomenon known as the "Korean Wave," has popularized Korean television dramas, pop stars, music, films, and fashion through East, Southeast Asia and beyond since the new millennium. As part of a growing inter-Asian flow of pop culture, the Korean Wave has had a significant impact in Vietnam, spurring numerous joint efforts between the two countries. V-Pop , or Vietnamese pop music and film, has created an explosion of pop stars and media products in Vietnam and overseas. These popular representations of the negotiations between modernity and tradition, in addition to burgeoning consumer culture, suggest new subjectivities. The triangulated relationship between Korea, Vietnam and the U.S. forged through war in Vietnam is also manifest in the increased cross-pollination of cultural influence and exchange.

For details please visit www.Arko.or.kr

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4. Jerome Covington, FF Alumn, on Fox5 TV, Dec 22, 12:30 am

Hey everyone, a band that I write for and play guitar in, herMajesty, will be on TV this Saturday night. Tune in!

Hi friends,
Hope you are having a great holiday season. We will be performing on FEARLESS MUSIC TV
This Saturday, December 22, 12:30 AM
On FOX 5 in the NYC area, and, if you are not in NYC,
Check out the time and channel listing at www.fearlessmusic.tv/channels.html
to find out when and where it airs. Most likely herMajesty will be the first band on the show, so
tune in early!!!

Cheers,
herMajesty
www.myspace.com/hermajestynyc

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5. Marina Abramovic, FF Alumn, in Artinfo, now online

Robert Ayers, FF Alumn, wrote a profile of Marina Abramovic, FF Alumn, for Artinfo.com Here is the intro and a link follows below.

Performance artist Marina Abramovic is about as close as there is to a one-person art movement. People who can name only one performance artist often identify this veteran but still beguilingly active Yugoslavian as the solitary survivor of an art form that they imagine came into existence in the 1960s and ran out of energy a decade later. It's a misperception she intends to change. Never short on ambition, Abramovic has just announced the establishment of the Marina Abramovic Foundation for Preservation of Performance Art, which will be based in upstate New York. Yesterday she spoke to ARTINFO about her plans.

http://www.artinfo.com/articles/story/26359/marina-abramovic-on-preserving-performance

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6. Shelagh Keeley, FF Alumn, in the National Post, Toronto, online

Please visit the link below to read about Shelagh Keeley, FF Alumn

http://www.nationalpost.com/story.html?id=162238&p=1

thanks.

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7. Paul Henry Ramirez at Caren Golden – Art in America, December, 2007

If previous figures of comparison for Paul Henry Ramirez included Aubrey Beardsley and Lari Pittman, his current work triangulates Carroll Dunham and Ellsworth Kelly. Buoyant, funny, sharp but not so it hurts, Ramirez’s new paintings, individually and collectively called “Chunk,” are as close to erotica as hard-edged abstraction gets. Bouncing across fields of bright color bound by smartly angled contours and tidy curves are paired balls of every size.

Straight lines shoot out between them. Gone are the hairy, furry or cloudy (if always meticulous) passages of previous work, which sometimes spilled from canvas to wall; the crisp lines and fetishistically smooth acrylic surfaces of the painting in “Chunk” speak of a certain belief in the perfectibility of form. But they are considerably too raunchy to suit abstraction’s more resolute purists.

Ranging in size from 36 to 66 inches square the numbered compositions (all 2007) include the bilaterally symmetrical 4, in which two pairs of testicular forms nestle against the ample curves of pendulous white lozenges set against a field of sunny green, the whole bisected by a big black bar. Numbers 2 and 3 are even more explicitly sexual, the latter a semaphore-like image of crossed phalluses in two shades of pinkish red, the former an elegantly bold icon in matte black that could serve as international signage.

In other compositions, though, smaller circles and narrower lines, some in glittery graphite gray, carom across straight-edged declivities to less suggestive effect. Occasionally, stray gestures familiar from earlier work, including thin striped accents in day-glo pink and orange and little peaked dollops of candy-colored paint, sweeten the imagery. A three-lobed black form set at a jaunty angle in the nested white and yellow fields of 6 vaguely suggests Mickey Mouse – and, even more generally, childhood’s innocent enthusiasms. And in all these paintings, the palette, dominated by bright primaries, as much as the squeaky-clean delineation of form, pulls against associations to flesh and its pleasures. Still, the point is made.

Discreetly but distinctly “Chunk” also invokes a specific pop-cultural moment – roughly, the early ‘60s – when game theory was a favored way of looking at personal relations, jazz was represented on record covers with heavily abstracted bongo drums and the Pink Panther was the cat’s meow. Covetable for their stylishness and formal satisfactions as well as their wholesome sexiness, these paintings are one more blow to geometric abstraction’s foundations in spiritual quest and moral rigor. Myron Stout probably wouldn’t be amused and Barnett Newman surely appalled, but, for more jaded – or more tolerant – 21st-century eyes, “Chunk” is hard to resist.

-Nancy Princenthal

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Goings On is compiled weekly by Harley Spiller

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