David Khang
FF Fund for Performance Art recipient, 2006-2007

David Khang
"M. Butterfly (After Shigeko Kubota)"
A Performance
Saturday, November 10, 2007 at 4:00pm
Happenings Lounge: 721 Broadway, 6th Floor, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU
Co-sponsored by Performance Studies International #13

David Khang plays with language and its performativity. In recent works that incorporate animals – a beef tongue, live butterflies, and a horse – Khang embodies a language that investigates constructions of race, gender and sexuality. Importantly, M. Butterfly (After Shigeko Kubota) is a citational work:

In 1960, LaMonte Young moved to NYC, and wrote Composition 1960 #5, which instructed the performer to "Turn a butterfly (or any number of butterflies) loose in the performance area."

In 1965, as part of the Perpetual Fluxus Festival, Shigeko Kubota performed her Vaginal Painting at the Cinemateque, NYC.

In 1988, David Henry Hwang's play M. Butterfly was produced on Broadway, NYC.

In 2007, these historically significant pieces – all performed in NYC - become departure points that converge onto one re-imagined and re-mixed performance with divergent and hyperbolic readings that have contemporary social/political/racial/sexual implications. Reinterpreting performative works from the past, then, becomes a means to re-imagine new poetic and political strategies for the present.

Khang's art practice is informed by previous education in the fields of psychology, theology, and dentistry, which continues to inform his ongoing concerns and works-in-progress. After attending Cooper Union (NYC) and Hong-Ik University (Seoul), Khang completed his BFA from Emily Carr Institute, and MFA with Emphasis in Critical Theory, from University of California, Irvine. Khang currently resides and works in Vancouver, where is an Adjunct Faculty at the Emily Carr Institute.

This work was made possible, in part, by Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art, supported by the New York State Council on the Arts and Jerome Foundation.

This work was made possible, in part, by Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art, supported by the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency and Jerome Foundation.